Warriors

Kyle Lowry confirms Warriors part owner Mark Stevens made vulgar remark

Kyle Lowry confirms Warriors part owner Mark Stevens made vulgar remark

We all saw Warriors minority owner Mark Stevens shove Toronto Raptors point guard Kyle Lowry.

But we weren't aware of what the "vulgar language" was that the Golden State minority owner used until Thursday afternoon when Lowry confirmed it during his NBA Finals media availability.

According to Lowry, Stevens said "Go f--- yourself" multiple times after the point guard crashed into the stands early in the fourth quarter of Game 3 on Wednesday night.

In the aftermath of the incident, Stevens has been banned from attending NBA games and restricted from attending all Warriors-related activities for one year and has been fined $500,000 for his actions.

On Thursday, Lowry was asked how he kept his cool in that situation.

"Understanding at the moment that my team needed me," Lowry told reporters in Oakland. "Understanding that there are plenty of fans and kids in the world watching this game, and me being a grown man and having kids myself, and I'm a grown man, and my kids could always go back and see that. Any other situation, if it wasn't in this situation, things probably would have been handled differently by me. Understand that I have two young children and to be able to hold myself to a certain standard, which I do, hold myself to a high, high standard, which I do and I've got to make sure I uphold that and that's a big thing for me, is being a guy that holds himself to a high standard and never letting guys like him get under your skin because that's bull crap."

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The year-long ban and fine may not be the end of the punishment for Stevens. NBC News and MSNBC senior media reporter Dylan Byers is reporting that Stevens will be forced to sell his stake in the Warriors by the start of the 2019-20 season.

NBA teams 'terrified' of Warriors' 2020 draft pick, Tom Haberstroh says

NBA teams 'terrified' of Warriors' 2020 draft pick, Tom Haberstroh says

At the moment, the 4-19 Warriors are the furthest thing from terrifying.

But a year from now, things could drastically change and that has the rest of the NBA in a panic according to NBC Sports NBA Insider Tom Haberstroh.

"The people I talk to around the league are really worried they are going to trade that first-round pick, the 2020 pick, because if they load up with an All-Star-type player with that pick, they are terrified," Haberstroh said during the Warriors-Hornets telecast on NBC Sports Bay Area on Wednesday. "Or if they land a Luka Doncic in the draft, they're terrified. So that 2020 pick, adding to the group they have established here with [Eric] Paschall stepping in right away, man, I think every team is going to try to do a gap year."

The Warriors are expected to have a healthy Steph Curry and Klay Thompson back next season to go along with Draymond Green, D'Angelo Russell and Kevon Looney. Paschall has burst on to the scene and looks like he could be an impact player for the next few seasons.

The Warriors will also have a taxpayer exception worth around $17 million and a taxpayer mid-level exception that they can use to sign established NBA players.

And then you throw in what is looking like a potential top-five 2020 draft pick? As Haberstroh says, the Warriors could trade that pick for an established star or they could hit the jackpot and draft an elite prospect to build around.

[RELATED: Warriors have lost their defensive principles]

The other 29 teams in the NBA have good reason to be worried. The Warriors could be scary again next season.

Now, we just have to get through the next four months.

Warriors' season of transition has cost them their defense principles

Warriors' season of transition has cost them their defense principles

The Warriors unfurled a massive defensive abomination Wednesday night, and in such a case it’s always tempting to throw a big blanket of blame over the braided head of D’Angelo Russell.

That’s Russell’s reputation, right? That he’s a fantastic scorer, with the ability to create, but his languid defense is going to give away as many if not more points than he produces?

And, man, did Hornets guards Devonte Graham and Terry Rozier, both smallish by NBA standards, get theirs. They combined for 58 points, basically burying the Warriors under an avalanche of 3-pointers in Charlotte's 106-91 victory.

Of course, they did. Russell, after missing nine games, was back in the starting lineup. Such a conclusion was predictable.

Yet it is, in this instance, a thousand ways wrong.

Though Russell wasn’t not exactly locking down either Graham or Rozier, a lot of the damage they did came with him on the bench. Indeed, it’s not hyperbole to suggest the Warriors lost this game because Russell was on the bench.

The Warriors trailed by three, 71-68, when D-Lo took a seat with 6:17 remaining in the third quarter.

A little more than five minutes later, with Russell still on the bench, the Warriors were squinting at a 12-point deficit. By the time D-Lo returned early in the third quarter, they were down 15 and the slow fade was on.

“The late third quarter really killed us,” coach Steve Kerr told reporters in Spectrum Center. “We just didn’t have much traction defensively. We turned it over a few times, and they got some easy hoops and it was too bad because we started out the 3rd quarter really well. We just couldn’t stay in the game.”

What happened? Russell’s rest break – which, it must be noted, was simultaneous to that of Draymond Green – was greeted by a 3-pointer by Rozier, followed by a Rozier dunk off a turnover by backup guard Ky Bowman, followed by a Graham triple.

Graham finished with 33 points, with 10 triples. Rozier had 25 points, with five triples.

The separation created during that stretch crushed the Warriors and, moreover, told a story about their defense that extends well beyond the lapses that can be attributed to Russell.

The team that won championships with its defense – though the offense received greater acclaim – has only a couple players committed to full defensive engagement and that’s hardly enough to offset the generally poor habits on that end of the floor.

The holey defense of November, the one Kerr lambasted a couple weeks ago, has seeped into December.

Yeah, the roster has been fortified. After spending the past two weeks with eight or nine available players, the Warriors dressed 11 against Charlotte. But the broad gaps and slow rotations and flat-footed postures remained – along with communication that alternates between little and none.

“You can’t play defense without communicating,” Green said. “Next to just wanting to play defense, the most important thing is communicating. We’ve got to be better.”

Which is what was said opening night, when the Clippers rolled up 141 points. It was said after the Spurs rang up 127, after the Jazz hit 122 and the Lakers hit 120. It was fairly screamed two weeks ago, after the Mavericks went for 142 – with Russell out of the lineup.

This is not to excuse the offense, which often goes fully zombiesque, with little movement and possessions that seem to give up after one or two passes. That offense committed 17 turnovers Wednesday, giving the Hornets 23 points.

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When the offense is better, and Russell certainly will help, the defense should get better. But the habits can be there at all times, no matter what the offense is doing. Graham and Rozier often had enough time to shower before aiming and firing.

Kerr and his coaching staff are trying to be patient. Green, who lives for defense, is trying to stay optimistic. They all understand the team is in transition.

But must a tumble from the elite forgo defensive principles to such a degree that it plummets right past ordinary and into a place beneath the NBA’s cellar?