Warriors

Mavs' Mark Cuban says Willie Cauley-Stein trade a 'steal-and-a-half'

Mavs' Mark Cuban says Willie Cauley-Stein trade a 'steal-and-a-half'

Dallas Mavericks forward Dwight Powell tore his right Achilles tendon Jan. 21.

Three days later, the Mavs acquired Willie Cauley-Stein from the Warriors in exchange for a 2020 second-round draft pick.

That selection is expected to land in the mid 50s because it's the Utah Jazz's pick, and they currently boast the fifth-best record in the NBA.

According to Mavs owner Mark Cuban, it was a great deal for his franchise.

From the Warriors' perspective -- they didn't possess a 2020 second-round pick (coincidentally enough, the Mavs have it from the Andrew Bogut trade in July 2016) but now do.

They also were able to create a guaranteed open roster spot for next season because Cauley-Stein has a 2020-21 player option that he could have exercised.

In addition:

[RELATED: Kerr reveals one specific memory of Kobe that stands out]

Cauley-Stein made his Mavs debut Tuesday night -- recording four points, three rebounds, two steals and one assist in a little over 12 minutes off the bench.

In the end, the trade just might work out very well for both sides.

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Steve Kerr cites Rockets' Game 7 loss to Warriors in praising midrange

Steve Kerr cites Rockets' Game 7 loss to Warriors in praising midrange

Warriors coach Steve Kerr is not a fan of the way the Houston Rockets play basketball. 

He doesn't like the extremely high number of 3-pointers they shoot (Houston averaged 46.5 attempts from deep over its last 19 games before the league was suspended).

So when Warriors television play-by-play man Bob Fitzgerald recently asked Kerr about the direction the NBA is trending in regards to style of play, his response should not surprise you:

"It's trending more and more every year to more shooting from every position. But the one thing I will always remember is our Game 7 in Houston a couple years ago when they missed 28 straight 3-point shots. Meanwhile, Kevin and Steph were hitting one midrange pull-up after another.

"In the playoffs, the midrange shot is the one you're gonna get because defenses are so in tune with everything you're trying to do. They're gonna take away the layups, they 're gonna take away the 3-point shots as best they can.

"The one that's always there is the midrange shot. I don't think you want to make it a steady diet -- you still want to shoot a lot of 3s, you want to get to the line, you want to get layups -- but it has to be a part of who you are."

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First and foremost, we need to clarify that it was 27 straight misses, not 28. 

Now that we got that out of the way, let's remind people of the particulars.

In Game 7 of the 2018 Western Conference Finals, Eric Gordon hit a 3-pointer with 6:43 remaining in the second quarter to give the Rockets a 42-28 lead.

[RELATED: Rockets beat Dubs seven out of 10 times in 2018, Morey says]

The next time Houston made a shot from beyond the arc came at the 6:28 mark of the fourth quarter, which made the score 89-79 in favor of the Warriors.

My goodness that is nuts.

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Steph Curry, Sabrina Ionescu embrace social distancing while practicing

Steph Curry, Sabrina Ionescu embrace social distancing while practicing

While social distancing is the name of the game in today's world, that doesn't mean two GOATs can just not get shots up.

So, of course, it's only natural that Warriors star Steph Curry and Oregon Ducks legend and future WNBA No. 1overall draft pick Sabrina Ionescu were getting refining their skills while staying the mandated six feet apart Wednesday.

Ionescu and Curry have formed a bond over the past year. Curry brought his daughters to watch Ionescu and the Ducks destroy Cal and then showed up to witness her make history by becoming the first player in NCAA history to record 2,000 points, 1,000 rebounds and 1,000 assists in her career during a win over Stanford.

"It's pretty amazing to see her set new levels of expectation for what greatness is, not just for women's basketball but for basketball in general," Curry told ESPN while watching Ionescu make history. 

"She's blazing a trail nobody has set foot on." 

The Triple-Double Queen made history just hours after she gave an emotional eulogy at Kobe and Gianna Bryant's memorial.

"'You have too much to give to stay silent.’ That’s what he said," Ionescu said at the memorial of her mentor and friend. "That’s what he believed. That’s what he lived. Through Gigi, through me, through his investment in women’s basketball. That was his next great act, a girl dad.

“Basketball in many ways was just a metaphor. I still text him even though he’s not here. ‘Thank you for everything. The rest is for you. Rest easy my guy.’ The last one I sent him said, ‘I miss you, may you rest in peace, my dear friend.’"

Ionescu returned to Oregon for her senior season in hopes of winning the program's first national title. That dream was abruptly halted when the NCAA canceled the men's and women's tournaments due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The Walnut Creek native now turns her attention to the WNBA, where she's expected to be the No. 1 overall pick of the New York Liberty.

As she continues to expand her game and be an icon for the game of basketball, Ionescu knows she can always reach out to Curry for advice of any sort.

"I love having a relationship with [Curry], just being able to remember when I was little, watching him and kind of emulating my game after him, to now being able to call him or text him any time that I need help with something," Ionescu told ESPN's Maria Taylor. 

[RELATED: Ionescu-Curry relationship one that's great for basketball]

When sports resume, the two Bay Area legends will go back to being basketball icons.

Until then, practicing while social distancing will have to do.

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