Warriors

Pau Gasol out indefinitely for Spurs after breaking finger in warmups

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Pau Gasol out indefinitely for Spurs after breaking finger in warmups

UPDATE (11:50am on Friday) -- Pau Gasol will undergo left hand surgery to repair the fracture in his fourth metacarpal, according to The Vertical's Adrian Wojnarowski.

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SAN ANTONIO -- Spurs center Pau Gasol is out indefinitely after breaking his left ring finger during pregame warmups Thursday night.

Gasol missed San Antonio's 118-104 victory over the Denver Nuggets. He was slated to start but left the court clutching his left hand before the national anthem. He had X-rays, which revealed a fractured finger on his non-shooting hand.

The team said there is no timeline for Gasol's return.

"We're going to look at it tomorrow," San Antonio coach Gregg Popovich said, "but he's going to be out for a while."

Gasol got hurt when he jammed his left hand against Kyle Anderson's shoulder while attempting a running hook.

"I don't know what happened," Anderson said before exiting the locker room after the game. "I don't know."

It was the first game Gasol missed due to injury this season. He sat out two games for rest.

The 7-foot center from Spain is in his 16th NBA season, but first with the Spurs after signing as a free agent following two seasons in Chicago. He is averaging 11.7 points and 7.9 rebounds in 39 games.

San Antonio also was without point guard Tony Parker, a late scratch from the starting lineup as well. Parker was in uniform and on the bench, but sat out because of a sprained left foot.

Parker is expected to play Saturday in Cleveland.

"It has happened before where his ankle kind of gets locked up, so I think we know what we need to do for it and I think he'll be back for Cleveland," Popovich said.

Why Kevin Durant thought Warriors' loss to Mavericks 'not odd at all'

Why Kevin Durant thought Warriors' loss to Mavericks 'not odd at all'

Saturday was a night to forget for the Warriors.

The 126-91 loss to the lottery-bound Dallas Mavericks was the Warriors' worst at Oracle Arena under coach Steve Kerr. Golden State, without Steph Curry and chasing the Western Conference's top seed, weren't even close to the West's second-worst team.

If that sounds out of the ordinary for an NBA Finals contender, Kevin Durant doesn't think so.

"It's not odd at all," Durant told reporters in Oakland after the loss on Saturday (via ESPN). "I think everybody in that locker room has gotten their asses beat at home before. I know this experience is different, how much winning we've done the last few years. But we're still in the NBA; guys have been a part of terrible games, along with the great games, as well. The good thing about it, we play tomorrow night too."

The Warriors were short-handed, and lopsided losses do happen to good -- even great -- teams. But wasn't Golden State supposed to have already turned this corner?

They weren't blown out on March 10, but the Warriors lost to the Zion-Williamson-contending Phoenix Suns on that date. Golden State wasn't missing any regulars as was the case on Saturday, and the team said all the right things about that being a necessary wake-up call headed into a successful road trip.

"The first two games were important to us, especially after that Phoenix loss," Durant said on March 19. "To come out and beat two teams on the road, it was probably the best two-game stretch of the season for us, and we needed that, we needed to feel good about ourselves, going on the plane, going to practice the next day."

[RELATED: Quinn Cook, Austin Rivers agree on worst NBA road city]

The grind and ensuing malaise of an 82-game season real, especially for a team that has played as many games as Golden State has in the last five years. Plus, the Warriors battled injuries and struggled mightly down the stretch of the regular season last year ... and still won their third championship in four seasons.

In other words, a March loss to the Mavericks might not mean all that much if the Warriors lift the Larry O'Brien Trophy once again. But if they don't, Durant might look back on it as a defeat that was odd, after all.

Quinn Cook, Austin Rivers agree that Cleveland is worst NBA road city

Quinn Cook, Austin Rivers agree that Cleveland is worst NBA road city

The verdict is in. Cleveland doesn't rock.

In fact, Cleveland sucks, according to Warriors guard Quinn Cook and Rockets guard Austin Rivers.

Why?

"My family is there, they're calling me all the time, it's muggy and it's cold," Cook told Warriors sideline reporter Kerith Burke and Rivers on The Uninterrupted Road Trippin' podcast.

Cook's first professional contract actually came with the Cavs. After he went undrafted out of Duke in 2015, Cleveland signed him to a contract in September of that year. A month later, they waived him.

Why does Rivers hate Cleveland?

"It's just always freezing there," Rivers said. "And if you're there a day in between, which teams don't even do anymore, like you guys are staying here [in Houston] right now so you guys don't have to go to OKC for two days. There's nothing to do. What do you do?"

[RELATED: Rivers on how Curry transformed NBA]

Cook may not like the city of Cleveland, but his greatest professional accomplishment occurred there last June when he won an NBA championship with the Warriors.

You can hear the rest of Rivers, Cook and Burke's conversation on Road Trippin' in the player below, and subscribe here.