Warriors

Report: Durant's 2017-18 salary will be about $10 million below his max

Report: Durant's 2017-18 salary will be about $10 million below his max

Kevin Durant is going to save the Warriors' ownership group a lot of money in 2017-18.

The 2017 NBA Finals MVP will reportedly sign a two-year deal that will be pay him between $25-26 million in Year 1, according to multiple reports.

The second year will reportedly be a player option, just like the contract he signed last summer

The maximum amount Durant could make next season -- $34.5 million.

[RELATED: Behind-the-scenes tour of Durant's Hollywood home for the summer]

He was expected to sign a deal using non-bird rights that would pay him $31.8 million.

This past season, he made $26,540,100.

Weeks ago, the report was that Durant was willing to take below the max in order for Golden State to keep Andre Iguodala and Shaun Livingston.

The Warriors' ownership group delivered on its end of the bargain, giving Iguodala a 3-year, $48 million deal and Livingston a 3-year, $24 million contract ($18 million guaranteed).

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders and a Web Producer at NBC Sports Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

Jacob Evans III: Warriors training camp profile

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AP

Jacob Evans III: Warriors training camp profile

The Bulls did it twice, with Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen leading the way. The Lakers accomplished it once, behind Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant. In the 42 seasons since the NBA-ABA merger, those are the only franchises to win three consecutive NBA Finals.

When the Warriors come together for training camp on Sept. 25, their goal is to become the third.

Here is a look at those players with guaranteed roster spots.

EIGHTH IN A SERIES

Player: Jacob Evans III
Position: Guard/wing
Height/weight: 6-6, 200
College: Cincinnati
Age: 21
Salary: $1.64M (first year of a two-year rookie deal worth $3.57M per Spotrac.)
NBA 2K Player Rating: 72

2017-18 in review: As a junior last season, Evans started every game for the second consecutive season and led Cincinnati in scoring and assists, while adding 4.7 rebounds. Bearcats coach Mick Cronin described Evans as an “elite” defender, while opposing coaches marveled over his versatility, composure and basketball IQ. The Warriors were impressed enough to select him in the first round of the draft, 28th overall.

Key stats: 36 games (36 starts), averaging 13.0 points (42.7 percent FG, 32.7 3p, 75.4 percent FT), 4.7 rebounds, 3.1 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.0 blocks per game.

Season highs: Points (24), rebounds (eight, twice), assists (seven), steals (five), blocks (four).

2018-19 outlook: Despite displaying a strong feel for the game and court awareness, Evans did not dazzle during Summer League. His jump shot was errant often enough to leave some within the organization wondering if a mechanical adjustment might be needed. Evans told NBC Sports Bay Area in August that he’s not concerned and that his confidence remains high. There will be growing pains, and the Warriors will be pleased as long as there is actual growth within the pain. They can afford to be patient because an immediate impact is not needed.

Andre Iguodala: Warriors training camp profile

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USATI

Andre Iguodala: Warriors training camp profile

The Bulls did it twice, with Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen leading the way. The Lakers accomplished it once, behind Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant. In the 42 seasons since the NBA-ABA merger, those are the only franchises to win three consecutive NBA Finals.

When the Warriors come together for training camp on Sept. 25, their goal is to become the third.

Here is a look at those players with guaranteed roster spots.

SEVENTH IN A SERIES

Player: Andre Iguodala
Position: Small forward
Height/weight: 6-6, 215
College: Arizona
Age: 34
Salary: $16M (Year 2 of a three-year pact worth $48 million)
NBA 2K Player Rating: 77

2017-18 in review: Though his defense is solid, Iguodala finds ways to elevate it at significant times. Likewise, his jump shot was dreadful before arriving in March and hanging around through the postseason. An important contribution that surfaced last season was his influence on younger players, specifically Kevon Looney and Quinn Cook, whose solid play was partly the result of Iguodala’s subtle tutelage. Even while missing 18 games, he again made an impact on both ends that defies individual statistics.

Key stats: 64 games (seven starts), averaging 6.0 points (63.2 percent FT, 28.2 percent 3s), 3.3 assists, 3.1 rebounds,

Season highs: Points (14, twice), assists (10), rebounds (eight, three times) minutes (37).

2018-19 outlook: The nagging injuries keep coming, indicating that Iguodala has eased into the twilight phase of his career. The Warriors are beyond worrying about what he does in the regular season, so he’ll be on a maintenance program even if he stays healthy. The priority is that he’s ready to play 18-25 minutes per game in the postseason. Quiet as it’s kept, Iguodala’s absence for the final three games of the Western Conference Finals was a huge loss and nearly cost the Warriors the series.