Warriors

Report: Steph Curry's personal security guard is no longer with the Warriors

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AP

Report: Steph Curry's personal security guard is no longer with the Warriors

Steph Curry is in the market for a new personal security guard.

Ralph Walker -- who has been with the Warriors since the 2011-12 season -- is no longer with the team, according to Janie McCauley of the Associated Press.

In March 2016, Chris Ballard of Sports Illustrated wrote a terrific profile on Walker.

An excerpt:

Over the last two seasons, Walker has likely spent as much time with Curry as anyone outside the star’s family. Last year, at the urging of GM Bob Myers, the team hired a second security rep—Walker’s old partner, West—so that Walker could focus on Steph. He now accompanies Curry virtually everywhere he goes when on the road.

He also can’t do this forever. It’s become nearly a year-round job—summer camps with Curry, attending sponsor commitments with other players, checking on someone’s house if they’re worried it’s not secure. Someday, maybe soon, he’ll call it quits.

It appears that day has come...

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

Andre Iguodala: Warriors training camp profile

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USATI

Andre Iguodala: Warriors training camp profile

The Bulls did it twice, with Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen leading the way. The Lakers accomplished it once, behind Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant. In the 42 seasons since the NBA-ABA merger, those are the only franchises to win three consecutive NBA Finals.

When the Warriors come together for training camp on Sept. 25, their goal is to become the third.

Here is a look at those players with guaranteed roster spots.

SEVENTH IN A SERIES

Player: Andre Iguodala
Position: Small forward
Height/weight: 6-6, 215
College: Arizona
Age: 34
Salary: $16M (Year 2 of a three-year pact worth $48 million)
NBA 2K Player Rating: 77

2017-18 in review: Though his defense is solid, Iguodala finds ways to elevate it at significant times. Likewise, his jump shot was dreadful before arriving in March and hanging around through the postseason. An important contribution that surfaced last season was his influence on younger players, specifically Kevon Looney and Quinn Cook, whose solid play was partly the result of Iguodala’s subtle tutelage. Even while missing 18 games, he again made an impact on both ends that defies individual statistics.

Key stats: 64 games (seven starts), averaging 6.0 points (63.2 percent FT, 28.2 percent 3s), 3.3 assists, 3.1 rebounds,

Season highs: Points (14, twice), assists (10), rebounds (eight, three times) minutes (37).

2018-19 outlook: The nagging injuries keep coming, indicating that Iguodala has eased into the twilight phase of his career. The Warriors are beyond worrying about what he does in the regular season, so he’ll be on a maintenance program even if he stays healthy. The priority is that he’s ready to play 18-25 minutes per game in the postseason. Quiet as it’s kept, Iguodala’s absence for the final three games of the Western Conference Finals was a huge loss and nearly cost the Warriors the series.

Draymond Green: Warriors training camp profile

Draymond Green: Warriors training camp profile

The Bulls did it twice, with Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen leading the way. The Lakers accomplished it once, behind Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant. In the 42 seasons since the NBA-ABA merger, those are the only franchises to win three consecutive NBA Finals.

When the Warriors come together for training camp on Sept. 25, their goal is to become the third.

Here is a look at those players with guaranteed roster spots.

SIXTH IN A SERIES

Player: Draymond Green
Position: Power Forward
Height/weight: 6-7, 230
College: Michigan State
Age: 28
Salary: $17.47M (Year 4 of a five-year contract worth $82M per Spotrac).
NBA 2K Player Rating: 87

2017-18 in review: Though Green’s defense generally was stellar, it didn’t meet the standard set the previous season, when he was rightfully voted Defensive Player of the Year. He also struggled with his 3-point shot. No question he felt the affects of several injuries, most notably nagging shoulder soreness. Yet he still led the team in rebounds, assists, blocks and steals. Green was, despite the numbers, still an overall force worthy of his third consecutive trip to the All-Star Game.

Key stats: 70 games (70 starts), averaging 11.0 points (45.4 percent FG, 30.1 percent 3p), 7.6 rebounds, 7.3 assists, 1.4 steals and 1.3 blocks per game.

Season highs: Points (25), rebounds (16), assists (16), blocks (six), steals (four, three times), minutes (40).

2018-19 outlook: Insofar as Green does not take well to failure, expect him to raise his overall defense to a level that would put him back in the DPOY conversation. Assuming a summer of physical healing, his shot should improve enough to once again force teams to guard him up top. Green’s fiery ways will continue -- they’re a crucial element of the team’s chemistry -- but don’t be surprised if there is a reduction in technical fouls related to jawing with officials.