Warriors

Rick Barry reacts to Warriors' all-time starting five omission by ESPN

Rick Barry reacts to Warriors' all-time starting five omission by ESPN

Last week, ESPN came up with the all-time starting five for every NBA team.

Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, Kevin Durant, Draymond Green and Wilt Chamberlain made the cut for the Warriors.

Hey Rick Barry -- does that bother you at all?

"Everybody's entitled to their opinion," the Hall of Famer said Tuesday on 95.7 The Game. "And that's all it is -- the opinion of some people. It is what it is. I know who I am. I know who I was as a player, and that doesn't change. Who cares.

"Bottom line is -- I have my championship ring sitting on my finger that I'm looking at right now."

In 1975, Barry helped bring the franchise its first NBA title since it relocated from Philadelphia to the Bay Area in 1962.

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He averaged 29.5 points, 5.0 assists and 3.5 steals in the NBA Finals that year, as the Warriors swept the heavily-favored Washington Bullets.

"We won as a team. We didn't win because of any one individual," Barry explained. "We won because we made a commitment to playing the game the right way, and everybody was a major contributor.

"That's what made it so very special. We were like a family."

And then the 12-time All-Star made a bold declaration.

"The most overlooked championship accomplishment in the history of major sports in this country," Barry said. "There hasn't been a more dramatic upset and accomplishment in a major sport in this country than what we pulled off."

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Warriors' Steve Kerr regrets 'embarrassing' 2019 China-Hong Kong comments

Warriors' Steve Kerr regrets 'embarrassing' 2019 China-Hong Kong comments

Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey created a significant controvery last October with his tweet showing support for the protestors in Hong Kong.

Warriors coach Steve Kerr -- who was asked about the issue a couple of days later -- wishes he handled his response differently.

"That was a really, really uncomfortable position to be in," Kerr told Scott Shafer and Marisa Lagos this week on KQED's "Political Breakdown" podcast. "China has been a partner in the NBA -- and across America with thousands of companies -- so all of a sudden, when the human rights issues really are being exposed and you're asked about it, it's like, 'Oh, wait a second.' 

"I was sort of deer in the headlights when I was asked about it. And I think it caught a lot of us by surprise. I handled it horribly. I regret my answer to this day. I sort of gave it 'no comment,' and then said something else. It was really embarrassing.

"But that's part of the deal when you're part of the public eye and you choose to speak out. You have to take that. You gotta be ready. You're gonna screw up sometimes."

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So what were Kerr's original comments?

"It's a really bizarre international story, and a lot of us don't know what to make of it," he said to reporters. "So it's something I'm reading about just like everybody is, but I'm not going to comment further than that.

"What I've found is that it's easy to speak on issues that I'm passionate about and that I feel like I'm well-versed on, and I've found that it makes the most sense to stick to topics that fall in that category.

"So I try to keep my comments to those things, and so it's not difficult. It's more I'm just trying to learn."

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Warriors' Steph Curry might wear Mavericks uniform as virtual fan

Warriors' Steph Curry might wear Mavericks uniform as virtual fan

Steph Curry is not physically in Orlando for the restart to the 2019-20 NBA season.

But the Warriors superstar could be making a virtual appearance in the bubble when the Dallas Mavericks take the court in the playoffs.

"When they get to the first round, I might be in there and wear my Dallas uniform and make everybody go crazy," Steph recently told CNBC's Jabari Young.

Why would the two-time NBA MVP do this? The answer is simple: His brother, Seth, plays for the Mavs.

The hope is that Seth is in uniform if and when this happens, as he missed Dallas' last two games because of right leg soreness.

Seth is having a terrific season, averaging 12.5 points and 2.0 assists, while shooting just under 50 percent from the field and 45 percent from beyond the arc.

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The Mavs practically are locked into the No. 7 seed in the Western Conference, and most likely will face the LA Clippers in the opening round of the playoffs.

As for Steph, there's an outside chance he can watch his little brother take the court in person -- not through virtual technology -- later this month.

[RELATED: Why Draymond is 'strongly against' a second NBA bubble]

The Athletic's Sam Amick reported Friday morning that the NBA is exploring the possibility for the Warriors (and the other seven teams not in Orlando) to join the bubble so they can hold organized team workouts/practices.

If this happens, you gotta assume Steph and former Warriors forward Andre Iguodala will be hitting the golf course together.

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