Warriors

Skip Bayless rips 'sour' Kevin Durant over comments on media attention

Skip Bayless rips 'sour' Kevin Durant over comments on media attention

Kevin Durant can become a free agent this summer, and if he hits the open market, he wants to be able to craft his own narrative.

The Warriors forward has been irritated with the media at various points this season, and he told NBC Sports Bay Area's Logan Murdock that reporters' constant attention on his upcoming free agency has irked him because, at the end of the day, it's his life and his story to tell. 

“That’s a hot topic,” Durant said of his free agency. “But you don’t have to talk about it. And then you don't have to get mad when I don’t want to talk about it. And then you don’t have to get mad when your little brain is roaming around, but you can’t find the correct answers. That’s bad journalism. That's not doing your job well.”

The two-time NBA Finals MVP also said he believes media is upset with the players who choose to tell their own story through various platforms rather than going through them.

Durant's comments were a hot topic across the sports world Tuesday, and they didn't sit particularly well with FOX Sports 1's Skip Bayless or Shannon Sharpe, who went at Durant on "Undisputed," calling the Warriors star "uninteresting" and claiming no one would notice if he were out for the playoffs.

"So, Kevin says, 'They need me,' " Bayless said. "No. Seriously, we don't. Do we need LeBron [James]? Yeah, I'm going to give you LeBron because trust me on this, Kevin Durant: LeBron James is 100 times more interesting than you are.

"I don't know what it is about LeBron James, born on Dec. 30, 1984, he and Tiger Woods have this in common. There's a force field that revolves around both of them, and I can't explain it because it's inexplicable. But stuff just keeps happening to both of them that is highly interesting. On a nightly basis, there's a subplot of every LeBron James game, and I miss him greatly. If Kevin Durant were out for the playoffs, nobody would really care -- I know he's been out for the playoffs, and nobody cared. Life goes on.

"The only thing interesting about Kevin off the court is, on a daily basis, what is he mad about today? What little unimportant thing is he mad about now, and why? That's all that's interesting about him because he always seems so sour. It's always downbeat with him."

Sharpe then went at Durant for what he saw as the Warriors star's "condescending tone" in the interview.

"Skip, the thing with me is the talking down," Sharpe said. "I mean, now Kevin Durant wants to be a Nobel Laureate. He wants to make people feel that he's so much smarter than you, that your brain is so small, you can't even begin to possibly imagine what's going on in my world with what I'm thinking about and what I'm feeling. I don't like the condescending tone."

[RELATED: Warriors' offense rolling with KD on fire]

Durant's irritation with the media's questions has been somewhat puzzling. By signing a two-year contract with an opt-out after the first year, Durant left the door open for his exit. Since Durant is a two-time NBA Finals MVP, it's only natural the media would be interested in whether he'll decide to stay or leave.

Also, the questions Durant has faced are no different than the volume of questions faced by any other marquee star before they head into free agency. While there has been an excessive number of rumors swirling around Durant, it's the same situation James faced prior to last offseason. It's the same thing Kyrie Irving and Kawhi Leonard have faced this season before they hit free agency.

As the Warriors continue their march to a third consecutive NBA title, the future of the dynasty will continue to be a topic of conversation with Durant's future in doubt. That's just the way it is.

Warriors' rest advantage grows with Raptors' Game 4 win against Bucks

Warriors' rest advantage grows with Raptors' Game 4 win against Bucks

If you subscribe to the notion that a playoff series doesn't begin until a home team loses, well, then the Eastern Conference finals have yet to begin.

After dropping the first two games of the series on the road, the Toronto Raptors evened the series with the Milwaukee Bucks on Tuesday night with a 120-102 victory at Scotiabank Arena in Game 4.

In winning each of the last two games at home, Toronto has ensured that the Eastern Conference finals will go at least six games. Meanwhile, the Golden State Warriors have already advanced to their fifth consecutive NBA Finals after sweeping the Portland Trail Blazers in four games.

Golden State has plenty of time to rest up before the Finals begin on May 30th. Whichever team represents the Eastern Conference won't have as much of a luxury.

Given the fact that several players on the Warriors' roster -- most notably Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala and DeMarcus Cousins -- missed part or all of the series sweep of the Blazers with injuries, the extra time off before the Finals begin certainly comes in handy.

[RELATED: Dubs overcome injuries to earn some much-needed rest]

Game 6 between the Bucks and Raptors is on Sat. May 25th, meaning whichever team that comes out of the East will have at most four days to recuperate before the Finals begin.

That would already seem to be a significant advantage for Golden State, but if you want to get greedy, there's plenty of reason to believe the Eastern Conference finals could require a Game 7.

Patrick Beverley says Clippers gave Warriors best challenge in playoffs

Patrick Beverley says Clippers gave Warriors best challenge in playoffs

Programming note: Watch the NBA Finals pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders on Thursday, May 30 at 4:00 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley is a confident person.

Beverley doesn't back down from anybody and he speaks his mind freely.

On Tuesday morning, he made the following declaration on Twitter:

Sorry Mr. Beverley, but we respectfully disagree.

Here were the results of the Warriors-Clippers first-round NBA playoff series:
Game 1 = Warriors 121, Clippers 104
Game 2 = Clippers 135, Warriors 131 (Golden State led by 31 points with about 7:30 left in the third quarter)
Game 3 = Warriors 132, Clippers 105
Game 4 = Warriors 113, Clippers 105
Game 5 = Clippers 129, Warriors 101
Game 6 = Warriors 129, Clippers 110

The Dubs' average margin of victory was nearly 18 points.

In the second round, the Rockets beat the Warriors twice and every game was decided by six points or less.

Although Golden State swept Portland in the Western Conference finals, the Blazers had the following leads:
Game 2 = 17 points early in the third quarter
Game 3 = 18 points late in the second quarter
Game 4 = 17 points with less than two minutes left in the third quarter

[RELATEDDame says Dubs-Blazers 'completely different' with one change]

While you could make the argument that the Clippers gave a better challenge than the Blazers, the Rockets clearly were the most formidable foe.

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