Warriors

Steph Curry addresses 'subtle racism' well-spoken Black men face

Steph Curry addresses 'subtle racism' well-spoken Black men face

Programming Note: “Race and Sports in America: Conversations” airs Monday at 5 p.m. PT on NBC Sports Bay Area.

The push for racial and social equality is a mission that's close to Steph Curry's heart. The Warriors star doesn't just talk the talk. He walks the walk, using his platform to help push the country to a better place.

Curry's status as one of the NBA's best players has opened many doors for him. However, Curry's status has not left him exempt from the racism and prejudice of society. Curry and Hall of Famer Charles Barkley discussed the "subtle racism" that well-spoken, successful Black men face when they are viewed as "anomalies."

"I think one thing you said, too, is the preconceived notions of how they view rich, successful Black people as anomalies and our intelligence and our well spokenness, that's always the first thing you hear," Curry said as part of NBC Sports' "Race and Sports in America: Conversations" which will air Monday at 5 p.m. PT. "If somebody knows how to be articulate if they know how to ... come into a room ‑‑ that's the subtle racism and prejudice that kind of starts to add on itself. 

"And if another White person hears that comment, they're going to think the same thing. And it's not going to trickle down to anybody else, and be able to create opportunities for somebody else to get that in that room and prove their value, prove their worth. It's just shifting perspectives and, again, holding everybody accountable whether it's a private conversation, whether it's a tweet, whether it's a video.  Whatever it is, to do the right thing, no pun intended, but to see everybody as equal and that's all we're asking for."

[RACE AND SPORTS IN AMERICA: Listen to the latest episode]

To Barkley, he knows there's a difference between the way rich Black people are treated by society and how poor Black people are treated. But he wants to find a way to give poor Black people and poor White people a way to achieve economic success that can open doors for them.

"The notion that rich and famous Black people are treated like regular Black people, that's not right," Barkley said. "We get treated great.  But I always worry about how we treat poor Black people.

"And that's the disadvantage that us four ‑‑ we're at a disadvantage because White people treat us great," Barkley said of he, Curry, Jimmie Rollins and Ozzie Smith. "And, like I say, I'm not worried about how they treat us because it really comes down to economics, too, at some point, because rich Black people aren't treated like poor Black people.  And that's the thing we've got to really engage conversation. How can we get more Black people and poor White people also, but they're in the same boat, give them economic opportunity? 

"That's what America's really got to grapple with."

[RELATED: Steph leading by example in racial, social justice push]

America has a long way to go to fulfill its promise as a country. There's reason to be positive that change can come, and America can become a better, more equal nation.

Curry is committed to helping make that a reality, no matter how long it takes.

How Steph Curry feels watching brother Seth in NBA bubble restart

How Steph Curry feels watching brother Seth in NBA bubble restart

Seth Curry has gotten accustomed to watching his brother Steph make deep runs in the NBA playoffs year after year, as the Warriors advanced to the NBA Finals in each of the past five seasons.

But 2019-20 saw the script flipped for the Curry family, as Seth and his Dallas Mavericks will be among the eight Western Conference teams in the 2019-20 postseason, while Steph and Golden State finished at the bottom of the West standings, going 15-50 before the NBA's suspension of the season in March.

“For most of my career, I’m usually the one who’s been home watching Steph late in the season,” Seth told the New York Times' Marc Stein. “Now it’s the other way around and I’m still at work. I can tell it’s a little tough on him.”

[BALK TALK: Listen to the latest episode]

Steph did tell Stein that he's felt a bit of "FOMO" about the Warriors not being among the 22 NBA teams initially chosen to play in the NBA's restart in Orlando, Fla.

“Obviously I was happy to see basketball back on TV, but that first week I had major FOMO (fear of missing out),” he told The New York Times' Marc Stein on Sunday night. "Once you see Bron (LeBron James) and Kawhi (Leonard) and P.G. (Paul George) go at it, and you remember how much fun it is to play in those types of games and that kind of level, you miss it badly."

The two-time MVP played in just five games this season after breaking his hand early in the season, and with fellow Splash Brother Klay Thompson missing the entire season while rehabbing from a torn ACL, there wasn't much hope for a return to the NBA Finals this season.

[RELATED: Why Bazemore-Warriors reunion in free agency makes sense]

Hypothetically getting nine months to recover before the 2020-21 season will be critical for Thompson and Curry after so many extra postseason games over the past five years.

It's not surprising that the hyper-competitive Steph would be a bit jealous of his brother, but he also told Stein he could see himself trekking to Orlando with his family to watch Seth and the Mavericks if they can advance out of the first round of the playoffs.

Warriors' Steph Curry 'had major FOMO' when NBA bubble games started

Warriors' Steph Curry 'had major FOMO' when NBA bubble games started

This probably won't come as a surprise to you, but Steph Curry truly enjoys playing basketball.

Crazy, right?

The three-time NBA champion -- who was limited to just five games during the 2019-20 NBA season because of a broken left hand -- misses competing against the best players in the world.

So when the seeding games in the Orlando bubble began July 30, Steph was a little conflicted.

“Obviously I was happy to see basketball back on TV, but that first week I had major FOMO (fear of missing out),” he told The New York Times' Marc Stein on Sunday night. "Once you see Bron (LeBron James) and Kawhi (Leonard) and P.G. (Paul George) go at it, and you remember how much fun it is to play in those types of games and that kind of level, you miss it badly."

Unfortunately for the two-time NBA MVP, it's unclear exactly when he will get a chance to take the court again with actual stakes on the line. With the coronavirus pandemic still raging, nobody truly knows when the 2020-21 campaign will begin.

[RUNNIN' PLAYS PODCAST: Listen to the latest episode]

But whenever next season does commence, he and his teammates will be ready to rock and roll.

“Our roster kind of speaks for itself in terms of what me, Klay (Thompson) and Draymond (Green) have been through, and what we’ve got left in the tank,” Steph told Stein. “But it’s on us to use this time wisely.

"It’s just unchartered territory, whether you’re in the bubble or not.”

[RELATED: Why Bazemore-Warriors reunion in free agency makes sense]

As for the aforementioned FOMO, how is the 32-year-old dealing with it?

"Curry said he relies on all the bonus family time he’s getting with his wife, Ayesha, and their three children, business endeavors and then special occasions like Sunday’s P.G.A. outing," Stein wrote.

And when it comes to business endeavors, Steph reportedly soon will be getting his own brand at Under Armour. So having some extra time on his hands to handle those details certainly can't hurt.

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