Warriors

Steph Curry fires back after Kevin Durant criticizes Warriors offense

Steph Curry fires back after Kevin Durant criticizes Warriors offense

Kevin Durant has sent some mixed messages about what he wants in his basketball situation.

He was the man in Oklahoma City, co-starring with Russell Westbrook in an offense heavily predicated on isolation basketball. In search of playing a more beautiful game, Durant left OKC in 2016 to join the Warriors and Steve Kerr's ball-movement offense.

After three years and unparalleled success, Durant exited the Bay to head to Brooklyn, signing with the Nets in free agency in July. The two-time NBA Finals MVP discussed his exit from the Warriors in an interview with the Wall Street Journal, and he had some critiques of Kerr's motion offense. Durant believes the system is limited, and there would come a time in the playoffs where he needed to "go into his bag" to get his own shot because the opposition had figured out how to slow down Kerr's offense.

Curry, who has been almost unstoppable in the Warriors' system, had something to say about Durant's criticism.

"Well, I don't care what plays we ran," Curry told ESPN's Rachel Nichols on "The Jump." "We won two championships. And at the end of the day, we had a lotta talent and there was an expectation of us figuring out how to balance all that. And we talked a lot about it throughout the three-year run. It wasn't always perfect, but I think in terms of, you know, the results and what we were able to do on the floor, that kinda speaks for itself.

"We all wanna play iso-ball at the end of the day in some way, shape or form. But I'd rather have some championships, too."

[RELATED: Steph responds to KD's belief Warriors never accepted him]

It's hard to argue with either point of view. Durant is one of the most talented scorers in NBA history, and was a seamless fit in Kerr's offense. But his isolation game almost is unguardable, so it's understandable why he would want the ball in his hands more. Really, who wouldn't want Durant to have the ball?

But as Curry said, the Warriors' results over the past five seasons speak to the success and potency of their ball-movement offense, one of the reasons the Warriors almost were able to win the 2019 NBA Finals even after Durant ruptured his Achilles.

Just turn on the tape, and you can see how effective the offense is, both with and without Durant.

Andre Iguodala describes Steph Curry's amazing hand-eye coordination

Andre Iguodala describes Steph Curry's amazing hand-eye coordination

We all know how much Andre Iguodala loves Steph Curry.

The former Warriors forward repeatedly has said the two-time NBA MVP is the second-best point guard of all-time, behind only Magic Johnson.

After Game 2 of last season's NBA Finals against the Raptors, Iguodala said he's all for anything that protects Curry's legacy.

On Thursday morning, Iguodala once again was singing Curry's praises.

"Steph's got something else. Anybody seen 'The Accountant?' Steph's like that. He's good at everything," the 35-year-old said on Hot 97 radio. "Hand-eye coordination. He probably could shoot somebody from 1,000 feet away.

"I've seen him throw darts. I've seen him bowl like 250. Ping-pong. Golf, he could play pro in real life. He can throw a fastball 80 miles per hour, right down the middle.

"He's got this hand-eye thing that's freakish."

[RELATED: Iguodala discusses NBA future, won't be like Vince Carter]

Wait. Steph can't hit 95 miles per hour on the radar gun? Lame.

Also, looks like I need to go watch the movie The Accountant.

Follow @DrewShiller on Twitter and Instagram

Kings mock Lakers with Twitter post after beating Melbourne United

Lakers center JaVale McGee tricks Warriors before dunk in preseason game

javaledunkus.jpg
USATSI

Lakers center JaVale McGee tricks Warriors before dunk in preseason game

JaVale McGee pulled a sneaky one from his bag of tricks Wednesday night against his old team. 

In the third quarter of the Warriors' 126-93 preseason loss to the Lakers at Staples Center, McGee began limping and grabbing his left knee. Within about three or four seconds, it seemed his antics became clear: JaVale was faking an injury. 

The Lakers center went from crouched out of bounds to back in play in a flash to catch a pass from fellow big man Anthony Davis and throw down a dunk. McGee couldn't help but laugh at the expense of his former Golden State teammates. 

But on Thursday, McGee claimed he thought he actually was injured. 

After chuckling about the play, McGee told reporters, "I hit my knee, I really hit my knee. And it hurt. I went out of bounds and I saw Draymond guarding AD and I was like, forget the pain, I'm gonna go get these buckets. So I ran back in and got a dunk.

"But I really did bump my knee." 

McGee didn't seem to be in any pain running back on defense, however, only he knows how his body truly felt.

[RELATED: What Draymond was right -- and wrong -- about in Suns rant]

If he was faking an injury, that kind of tomfoolery might seem illegal at first, but in reality, McGee looks like a genius who perfectly knows the rule book. Section XV of the NBA rule book states: "An offensive player shall not leave the playing area of the court without returning immediately and cannot repeatedly leave and re-enter the court." There are exceptions, though, the first of which comes from an injury. 

While the Lakers have been dominating the Warriors in the preseason, McGee has been catching up on his reading. The Dubs, and the rest of the NBA, surely will have their eyes on JaVale goes down.