Warriors

Steph Curry's personal security detail Ralph Walker returns to Warriors

Steph Curry's personal security detail Ralph Walker returns to Warriors

OAKLAND – Stephen Curry’s shadow is back.

Ralph Walker, the retired Oakland police officer who spent seven years providing security for the Warriors, most of them as Curry’s personal detail, is returning after a one-year hiatus.

After so many years of following Curry around the world, Walker retired from the Warriors last July, citing the demands of a job that sometimes goes a month or more between off days.

But on Tuesday, as Curry came to East Oakland to dedicate a newly refurbished basketball court at Concordia Park, there was Walker, one eye on Stephen and the other scanning the 300 or so people in the immediate vicinity.

Walker pronounced himself refreshed and ready to dive back into the endless hours required to ensure the safety of the team’s most valuable asset.

“I feel like John Wick,” he said, referring to the Keanu Reeves character that came out of retirement for, well, special assignments.

Unlike Wick, who scorches earth when on task, Walker is known for his understated approach that actually seems to make him particularly effective.

[RELATED: Steph fired up about Draymond's contract extension]

The level of comfort and trust between the two led Curry to designate Walker as one of the few individuals to be gifted with a pair of the Under Armour Curry 6 special edition shoes in June. The shoes are dedicated to Oakland, with the city’s name scripted on the sides.

A few weeks later, Walker is back on the job. Maybe it was the shoes.

Warriors star Steph Curry shares his favorite Stephen Jackson story

Warriors star Steph Curry shares his favorite Stephen Jackson story

The Warriors drafted Steph Curry in June 2009, and traded Stephen Jackson a couple weeks into the 2009-10 season.

So the two were not teammates for very long, but long enough to create some memories.

And on the most recent episode of Showtime's "All the Smoke" with Jackson and Matt Barnes, Curry shared his favorite "Stack Jack" story:

"This was probably like two weeks before you got traded -- we were on a road trip in Indiana, and like seven of us went to a steakhouse right down the street from the hotel.

"The day before, somebody had started rumblings about your trade rumors and (how) you were unhappy and (how) people in the locker room were unhappy -- media taking over, doing what they do.

"And I remember sitting at the dinner table, and you called up this reporter and cussed him out so bad for writing some untruthful article (laughing). And I'm sitting there, like (laughing) "This how we do it! OK. This how we do it!' I was crying (laughing).

"I was crying. That just told me when he knows what he knows and he's passionate about something, he's gonna let you know."

[RELATED: Steph tells story of encouraging call he got from Monta]

The visual of Jackson cussing out a reporter in the middle of a restaurant is just fantastic, and very on-brand.

"Stack Jack" stories never get old.

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Why Warriors' Run TMC era is one of biggest what-ifs in NBA history

Why Warriors' Run TMC era is one of biggest what-ifs in NBA history

Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond and Chris Mullin -- the artists formerly known as "Run TMC" -- spent just two full seasons together as teammates with the Warriors, and yet they still hold an iconic place in the history of the franchise. Why is that?

Well, aside from the exciting style with which they played -- they led the league in scoring in their very first season together and revolutionized the NBA in many ways -- it likely has to do with how quickly it all came undone. After giving the eventual champion Los Angeles Lakers a run for their money in a second-round playoff series during the 1990-91 season, Richmond was traded to the Kings the following November, and Warriors fans were left to wonder, 'What if?'

It turns out the fans aren't the only ones still pondering the possibilities of what a lengthy Run TMC might have been like. The three components do so, as well.

"That was the best time we played," Mullin told NBC Sports' Tom Haberstroh. "That was the most fun we had. The one thing we regret is we didn't get enough time to maybe ... two years, man. That's a quick time to make a decision. ... Point being, think about if they had broken up Steph [Curry] and Klay [Thompson] after two years."

Whoa. Good point, Mully. Just like Run TMC, the Warriors reached the playoffs in the Splash Brothers' second season together. But unlike Run TMC, Curry and Thompson have stuck together since, and have gone on to lead the organization to not one, not two, but three NBA championships.

[LISTEN: The Habershow podcast with Run TMC]

In response to Mullin, Haberstroh called Run TMC, "One of the biggest what-ifs in NBA history." Mullin didn't disagree.

"That's why it's still alive, too," he explained. "It's one of those things that keeps it alive, right? It does. 

"And we'll buy into it," Mullin said with a chuckle. "We'll say we would have won four championships, no question."

That's quite a statement coming from a trio that won exactly one playoff series together, but to Mullin's point, there's no way for us to ever know.