Warriors

These five low-key NBA records never will be broken with new-age thinking

These five low-key NBA records never will be broken with new-age thinking

Dozens of NBA records are destined to live forever, and it seems most of them are owned by Wilt Chamberlain. He posted such insane single-season averages as 50.4 points and 48.5 minutes. He scored 100 points in a game and was greedy enough to retire with 23,924 rebounds -- almost 11,000 more than Shaquille O’Neal.

Many of the records not held by Chamberlain belong to Bill Russell, who once snagged 32 rebounds in a half, led the Boston Celtics to eight consecutive championships and own 11 rings.

For that reason, we’re excusing Wilt and Bill from the room as our, um, committee pursues the goal of identifying the five safest NBA records that rarely get discussed.

The countdown from No. 5 to No. 1 begins with the most “vulnerable” record and ends with the mark that can sit comfortably among the totals in what we call the Chamberlain/Russell tier:

5. Minutes in a regular-season game

Record: 69 by Dale Ellis on Nov. 9, 1989

OK, the game’s 73 minutes and five overtimes make it the longest in the shot-clock era. And, OK, Ellis’ Seattle SuperSonics were defeated 155-154 by the Milwaukee Bucks.

But 69 minutes is 69 freaking minutes. Ellis scored a game-high 53 points on 18-of-39 shooting, including 3-of-7 from deep. His teammate, Xavier McDaniel, logged 68 minutes.

Only two players have labored beyond the 60-minute mark in a 21st century game: Vince Carter with 63 and Jalen Rose with 61, both in 2000-01. In the era of high-tech monitoring of physical exertion, no coach will allow a player to approach 70 minutes in a regular-season game.

4. Career playoff minutes

Record: 10,049 by LeBron James

This is testimony to James’ ability to find another level in the playoffs. And he’s still active.

That LeBron’s Lakers didn’t make the 2019 playoffs was of no consequence because he zoomed past Tim Duncan (9,370) and into the top spot the previous year. To put this into perspective, he has played more minutes than Patrick Ewing (5,207) and Pau Gasol (4,825) combined.

To surpass James, someone would have to average about 40 minutes per game over more than 250 games -- and that’s only if LeBron never makes another postseason appearance. Only retirees Derek Fisher (259) and Tim Duncan (251) have exceeded 250 postseason games.

For the record, Kevin Durant (5,598) is No. 2 among active players.

3. Career assists

Record: 15,806 by John Stockton

Stockton’s record speaks mostly to his pass-first mentality and his practically perfect synchronicity with longtime teammate and fellow Hall of Famer Karl Malone. The Stockton-Malone pick-and-roll was, for much of their long careers, the league’s deadliest two-man game.

Jason Kidd also had a pass-first mentality and also played forever, and still retired in second place, 3,715 dimes behind Stockton.

Only two active players are more than halfway to Stockton. Chris Paul has 9,161 and LeBron has 8,662. Both are in the all-time top 10. Both would have to average more than 10 assists per game, over 80 games, for the next eight seasons.

Let’s see if CP3 and Bron are still going at age 42.

2. Consecutive games

Record: 1,192 by A.C. Green

Green, a power forward that played most of his career as a Laker, was known for two things. One, he was a virgin among teammates with libertine impulses. Two, from Nov. 19, 1986 until April 17, 2001 he played every single game.

With training staffs often advising coaches to give players rest, it’s notable when someone suits up for all 82 games. Green played every game for 14 seasons in a row. He actually played 83 games in 1996-97 -- 27 for Phoenix and 56 for the Mavericks after the Suns traded him to Dallas.

The longest active streak is 304 games, held by Utah Jazz forward Joe Ingles.

With teams looking ahead to the playoffs, there is more dedication to managing regular-season minutes. It’s a different mindset than it was during Green’s career.

There may be a better chance of a player remaining a virgin throughout a long career than playing 1,192 consecutive games.

1. Technical fouls in a season 

Record: 41 by Rasheed Wallace in 2000-01

The most unbreakable record of all, held by the man synonymous with technical fouls.

Wallace was whistled for 38 techs the year before setting the record and 27 more the year after. When Sheed bumped it up to 29 in 2004-05, the NBA tossed him to its rules committee and urged it to do something. Anything.

[RELATED: Report: Ex-Warriors, Kings center Cousins injures knee]

The committee instituted another “Sheed Rule.” Going into effect in 2006-07, penalizes players that exceed 15 techs in a season, which Wallace did 10 times in a career during which he totaled 317 techs. No. 16 comes with a one-game suspension and a $5,000 fine. Every tech after that results in a $5,000 fine, and every two warrants another fine and suspension.

There is a reason why no player has since exceeded 19 techs in a season. Perhaps because they realize getting to 41 would require an extra checkbook, a mental health evaluation and a lot of cold stares from teammates.

How Warriors plan to keep Steph Curry healthy despite heavy workload

How Warriors plan to keep Steph Curry healthy despite heavy workload

Steph Curry’s health has long been a topic of conversation around the Warriors organization.

Curry was hampered by ankle issues over his first few seasons in the NBA, and has missed 50 games over the last two seasons, including six playoff games in 2018.

The Warriors know they must invest in keeping Curry on the floor after losing Kevin Durant and Andre Iguodala, not to mention playing at least half the season without Klay Thompson. 

Rick Celebrini, the Warriors’ director of sports medicine and performance, was given a stacked budget to equip Chase Center with all the amenities the team needs to keep its aging stars on the floor.

From The Athletic’s Marcus Thompson:

They’ve got a hot tub, cold tub and underwater treadmill, which is already in heavy rotation as Klay Thompson, Kevon Looney and Willie Cauley-Stein use it. They’ve got a “mindfulness room” — a phone-free space where they can relax, meditate or even engage in brain-stimulating games on iPads or virtual reality training. A psychologist will even be on call if necessary. Yes, the Warriors now have their own Wendy Rhoades from “Billions.” They’ve also got a new AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill, which uses air pressure to allow individuals to walk or run at a lower percentage of their body weight — so a 230-pound Draymond Green will feel like he’s 115 pounds while he’s running.

The new BioFreeze Performance Center will also be equipped with sleep pods, which are the most compelling development for the two-time MVP.

“The sleep pods,” Curry told Thompson. “That’s what I’m excited about.”

The point guard will need all the remedies he can get to avoid missing time on a nearly brand-new roster in Golden State. But no one knows Curry’s body better than himself.

“I’ve always been on top of it like that,” Curry said. “So it won’t be anything new. All I need is the sleep pod and some space for the NormaTec sleeves.”

The additional postseason minutes accrued over five straight runs to the NBA Finals have also played a major factor, as Steph has played in 93 postseason games over that span. While the addition of KD allowed Steph to take more of a breather during the 2017 and 2018 playoffs, Durant’s multiple injuries during last year’s postseason forced Curry to once again shoulder the majority of the burden, something he will now clearly need to do on a nightly basis.

[RELATED: Looney to miss preseason; Dubs hope he'll play in opener]

The good news for Curry is, the Warriors are sparing no expense in making sure he is ready to go as Golden State looks to keep the dynasty alive.

LeBron James mentions Steph Curry, clowns in cryptic Instagram post

LeBron James mentions Steph Curry, clowns in cryptic Instagram post

LeBron James did not play in the Warriors-Lakers preseason game Monday night in Los Angeles.

But about 80 minutes before the opening tip at Staples Center, the three-time NBA champion created headlines when he spoke to the media regarding the drama between the NBA, China and Rockets general manager Daryl Morey.

Then about five minutes before the game started, he sent out two tweets:

Before the fourth quarter began, LeBron and Warriors superstar Steph Curry exchanged pleasantries:

After Tuesday's practice, LeBron said he feels like his pregame comments were taken out of context:

About 45 minutes later, he took to Instagram:

Are "they" -- the clowns that is -- the media in general or anybody who disagreed with what he said? Both?

Why send that message to Curry? 

[RELATEDHow security man Walker shocked Steph with Warriors return]

Does LeBron realize he sounded foolish when he told reporters that he believes Morey "was either misinformed or not really educated on the situation, and if he was, then so be it," and immediately followed that with: "I have no idea, but that is just my belief."

Is he aware that the backlash is self-inflicted?

Are you sick of this whole story?

Let's move on.

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