Warriors

Warriors, 76ers collaborate to honor Philadelphia native Kobe Bryant

Warriors, 76ers collaborate to honor Philadelphia native Kobe Bryant

Joel Embiid on Tuesday night played while wearing the No. 24 on his jersey instead of his customary 21.

His 76ers teammates wore one of two numbers during pregame warmups. Some wore 24, others wore 8.

The Warriors, every last one of them, wore black. The weight of the moment was etched on the face of rookie guard Jordan Poole.

This was the power and influence of Kobe Bryant, whose death on Sunday is being absorbed ever so slowly by the NBA fraternity and many outside the sport.

Temporarily defying the rules and purpose of competition, the Warriors and 76ers began the game in Philadelphia -- where Kobe was born and attended high school -- by allowing themselves to reflect on something bigger than basketball.

[RELATED: Draymond, Kerr having trouble processing Kobe's death]

They spent the first 35 seconds of the game focused solely on Kobe’s life and death. Embiid won the opening tip, directing the ball to Ben Simmons, who promptly placed it on the floor, where it sat for the next eight seconds. The crowd inside Wells Fargo Arena stood and cheered, after which an eight-second backcourt violation was assessed, the turnover giving the ball to the Warriors.

D’Angelo Russell inbounded to Draymond Green, who followed Simmons’ example by placing the ball on the floor. The Warriors took a 24-second possession violation, giving the ball back to the Sixers.

The first dribble was not taken until 11: 25 remained in the first quarter, the first shot coming 22 seconds later.

This all came after a pregame ceremony to honor Bryant. His Lower Merion High School No. 33 jersey, white with maroon trim, was spotlighted, along with eight more spotlights signifying the other victims that perished in the helicopter crash Sunday in Southern California. The names of all nine, including Kobe’s 13-year-old daughter Gianna, were in lights on the message board.

It was another example of the vibe permeating the NBA since the tragedy.

Warriors' company Peloton group now competing against Brooklyn Nets

Warriors' company Peloton group now competing against Brooklyn Nets

Last week, we learned that Warriors superstar Steph Curry has begun taking part in the franchise's group Peloton morning rides.

On Sunday, Marcus Thompson of The Athletic provided more details:

Jennifer Millet, the Warriors senior vice president of marketing, launched a Peloton channel on the company’s Slack over a year ago. It started with about a dozen people in the organization who had the popular bike.

Then the shelter-in-place order came down in California last month and suddenly the Slack channel was crowded. There are more than 30 people in the Warriors’ group. Some 15 to 20 will be on their morning rides, the others joining the class later since it is recorded and saved.

The Warriors have begun competing against the Brooklyn Nets’ company Peloton group. The San Francisco Giants’ group joined the Warriors’ mix on Thursday.

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We know that Draymond Green is a huge fan of riding the bike and "attempts to destroy everyone around him." We also know that Curry just is "above average" on the Peloton so far.

What we don't know is if two-time NBA Finals MVP Kevin Durant is apart of the Nets' contingent battling against Golden State.

[RELATED: Kerr uses viral dog and cat video to make fun of NBA career]

If he is, we need an upcoming race broadcast on national TV with announcers and everything.

The world deserves that, right?!

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Steve Kerr uses viral dog and cat video to make fun of his NBA career

Steve Kerr uses viral dog and cat video to make fun of his NBA career

Warriors coach Steve Kerr is good at the whole self-deprecation thing.

And he proved it again late Sunday night with an eight-word tweet.

This judge gives the eight-time NBA champion a perfect 10 out of 10.

Checking in at 6-foot-3 and 175 pounds -- without much leaping ability -- Kerr wasn't exactly known for being a lock-down defender.

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But the No. 50 overall pick in the 1988 NBA Draft was able to stick in the league for 15 seasons because of his incredible 3-point shooting (45.4 percent for his career), his ability to take care of the basketball (0.6 turnovers per game) and leadership skills.

[RELATED: Why Kerr isn't doing video calls with his Warriors players]

Hey coach -- for the sake of content, can you start tweeting more often?

Please and thank you.

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