Warriors

Trainer tells story of Steph perfecting 'borderline crazy' drill

Warriors

Steph Curry has not played in an NBA game since March 5, and that came after being sidelined since Oct. 30.

Needless to say, the Warriors' superstar cannot wait for the 2020-21 season to begin. But he has to stay patient because Opening Night might not be until late January or early February.

"We have to find different ways to really, really challenge him in our workouts," his personal trainer, Brandon Payne, said Friday to NBC Sports NBA Insider Tom Haberstroh on "The Habershow" podcast. "We have to find different ways to keep him mentally engaged and competitive.

"So a lot of the shooting games and shooting drills that we've used in the past, we've taken those same drills and we've taken them up a level. We're making them even more competitive."

Can you give us an example?

"For instance, I've expanded the number of shots in most of the games, but I've decreased the amount of time," Payne explained. "He wasn't a fan of mine in workout (number) three or four this summer because we had a tough one. But just like he always has, he met the challenge (and) worked his way through it."

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Payne then explained how Curry perfected one specific workout.

"It ends up being 30 consecutive makes but it's from all over the court," he said. "And it includes free throws. We can't finish until you make those 30 consecutive shots. He got that done in less than three or four minutes ... usually, it's 20 shots in about the same amount of time, but I added additional shots.

 

"It's tough when you got to tell the greatest shooter that ever lived that something's not good enough ... you have to find ways that challenge him that are borderline crazy, but also fall into the category of making sense to him as to why we're doing it.

"Everything has to have a game purpose, so he's able to apply what we're doing to game situations."

The lesson here boys and girls is that you don't become the only unanimous MVP in NBA history by not working hard.

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