Warriors

Warriors vs. Heat live stream: How to watch NBA game online and on TV

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NBC Sports Bay Area

Warriors vs. Heat live stream: How to watch NBA game online and on TV

The Warriors (39-15) host the Heat (25-28) on Sunday night at Oracle Arena, marking the first time the two teams have faced each other in more than a year.

Both of the matchups between Golden State and Miami last season happened before the turn of the calendar year, so they didn't face each other at all in 2018. Sunday's game holds extra significance in that it represents future Hall of Famer Dwyane Wade's final game at Oracle.

The Warriors have continued their torrid stretch leading into the All-Star break, as they've won 14 of their last 15 games, including a 10-point road victory over the Suns on Friday. Following the matchup with the Heat, all that stands between the Warriors and the All-Star break will be a home-road back-to-back against the Jazz and Trail Blazers on Tuesday and Wednesday.

[RELATED: Warriors' bench comes to the rescue in victory over Suns]

Miami, on the other hand, has had a tougher go of it as of late. They've lost four of their last five games, including a disappointing defeat at the hands of the Kings on Friday that the Heat let slip through their fingers. They currently occupy the eighth and final playoff spot in the East, but sit just a half-game ahead of Detroit in ninth.

Here's how you can watch Warriors vs. Heat on NBC Sports Bay Area and streaming online:

When: Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019 at 5:30 p.m. PT (pregame at 4:30 p.m.)
TV channel: NBC Sports Bay Area
Live stream: MyTeams by NBC Sports app

Desktop users can stream the game by clicking this link.

Warriors star Steph Curry has fun playing pick-up basketball with kids

Warriors star Steph Curry has fun playing pick-up basketball with kids

They say in order to be the best, you must compete against the best.

If you go by that logic, the kids you're about to see may have a bright future -- they're competing against Steph Curry.

Recent footage surfaced of a few kids playing a pickup game with the Warriors star, and these kids could hang:

During the pick-up game, you can hear Steph chatting it up like it's an NBA game, saying "I got your help" and celebrating after a 3-pointer.

He didn't take it lightly on the young ones.

Curry, of course, showed off some of his masterful shooting, ball-handling and footwork during the scrimmage.

[RELATED: Curry cements himself as social justice leader]

Imagine being one of the kids who could add that to their résumés before even reaching high school.

Ex-Warriors Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala chime in on double-team debate

Ex-Warriors Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala chime in on double-team debate

We're talking about pick-up.

Not a game. Not a game. Not a game. We're talking about pick-up.

Ah, yes, the doldrums of the NBA offseason. We have officially arrived. You can tell because the NBA world's focus has drifted to a rather ridiculous topic over the last 24 hours.

It all started when video surfaced of Suns guard Devin Booker getting visibly frustrated as a result of being double-teamed in a pick-up game featuring several other NBA players, including Ben Simmons, Joakim Noah and Trey Lyles.

"Hey bro, we're not doubling in open gym," Booker can be heard saying. "I see that s--t all season. Come on, man. Let's work on our games."

"Yeah, we are," Noah retorted. "It's part of the game." 

On Wednesday morning, Hawks guard Trae Young voiced his thoughts on the subject, aligning himself with his pal Booker.

Young's thoughts have since made the rounds, with numerous former and current NBA scouts and players chiming in. Ex-Warriors star Kevin Durant couldn't resist.

Apparently, this isn't the first time Durant has expressed such feelings. Two of his now-former teammates got under his skin doubling him in a practice (warning: NSFW language).

[RELATED: Kerr wants Livingston involved with Warriors for years]

It's a bit ironic that Iguodala mentioned it being right after the All-Star break, as Twitter detectives have tracked down visual evidence of Durant himself participating in a double-team against Steph Curry in what technically was an exhibition -- the NBA All-Star game.

Durant responded to that tweet, pointing out how that double-team was drawn up by coaches, whereas there aren't typically any in your average pick-up game. That's a fair point, but here's the problem with his reasoning: Bonafide NBA players like Simmons, Noah and Lyles don't need a coach to tell them when, who or how to double-team.

If Booker wants to work on his offensive game in open gym, others should be allowed to work on their defensive game, too, right? And, frankly, wouldn't Booker benefit more in the long run from working on his game against the same kind of defense he actually faces?

If you want to work on your NBA game, then don't be surprised when you encounter NBA defense. Anything else is simply batting practice.