Warriors

Why Stephen Jackson, Baron Davis, Don Nelson got drunk together once

Why Stephen Jackson, Baron Davis, Don Nelson got drunk together once

Programming note: Watch the pregame edition of Warriors Outsiders today at 4 p.m., streaming live on the MyTeams app.

Stephen Jackson likes to party. So does Don Nelson.

And back in January 2007, player and coach bonded over some alcoholic beverages, and built the foundation for a special relationship.

NBC Sports Bay Area's Logan Murdock will publish an oral history of the "We Believe" Warriors, which you can check out Monday on the website and the My Teams app, and the following story is included in the must-read piece:

Shortly after Stephen Jackson arrived in the Bay Area following a 2007 trade that sent him from the Indiana Pacers to the Warriors, his new coach, Don Nelson, called with a simple directive.  

Go to Smitty's Cocktails near Lake Merritt. ...

"We played shuffleboard and drunk scotch for hours," Jackson said. "Talking about pissy drunk."

For the rest of the night, Nelson, Jackson and [Baron] Davis talked strategy and life before the coach made a declaration.

"Nellie tells me and BD while we're drunk: ‘You guys are going to be my captains. You run this team, and we're going to have fun.’ ” Jackson said.

Run this team and have fun they most certainly did.

In Golden State's historic upset of the Mavs in the first round of the playoffs that season, Jackson and Davis were awesome:
-- Jackson = 22.8 points, 47.5 percent from deep  4.5 rebounds, 3.7 assists, 2.0 steals
-- Davis = 25.0 points, 45.5 percent from deep 6.2 rebounds, 5.7 assists, 1.8 steals

Jackson and Davis are legends in the Bay Area, and will be forever.

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Rookie Alen Smailagic eager to prove he's ready for the Warriors, NBA

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Rookie Alen Smailagic eager to prove he's ready for the Warriors, NBA

OAKLAND – The Warriors have a timetable for the development of Alen Smailagic that seems reasonable for the 18-year-old rookie from Serbia.

Give him two years, and maybe he’ll be ready.

But if you bring that timetable to Smailagic, he pounces and swats into the fourth row.

“I don’t think so, that it’s going to take me two or three or four years,” he said Monday after a news conference introducing the team’s rookies. “I think I’m going to do good this year. I already told them that I don’t want to just wear the jersey. I really want to play.”

He gets points for confidence. Smailagic (pronounced Smile-a-GEECH) sees the Warriors trying to fill a roster with a plethora of openings and visualizes himself pulling on his jersey, No. 6, and jogging onto the floor at Chase Center next October.

The Warriors, after all, could use a skilled 6-foot-10, 225-pound center-forward that plays hard and has a high basketball IQ. Smailagic flashed those assets last season, while playing 818 minutes, spread out over 47 games, for the team’s G-League affiliate in Santa Cruz.

That that he accomplished that as the youngest player in G-League history persuaded the NBA Warriors, fearing another team may come after their secret stash, to move up and use the first of two second-round picks (39th overall) to select. Because Smailagic was 17 at the time of the 2018 NBA draft, he was ineligible to be chosen. To play pro ball in America, the G-League was his only option.

“They didn’t disrespect me because of my age,” Smailagic said of his experience in Santa Cruz. “They really wanted me to play and they reacted to me like I’m a professional.”

Though Smailagic was projected to go late in the second round, somewhere between 50 and 60, the Warriors heard enough from Santa Cruz coach Aaron Miles and general manager Kent Lacob that they didn’t want to risk losing him.

Indeed, there is firm belief within the organization that he has considerable potential, perhaps enough to be a starter, if not a true impact player. That potential, however, is years away.

“He’s going to be a player in the league,” one Western Conference scout told NBC Sports Bay Area on Monday. “He can be really good if his body continues to mature. There is no question about his desire or his skill.

“But I think he’s a couple years away.”

If Smailagic can make the roster as a two-way player – a distinct possibility – that would be a triumph for someone much more uncertain about his command of English than his game, and whose previous experience was in the European junior leagues.

Smailagic, nicknamed Smiley for obvious reasons, says he as a grew and gravitated toward basketball, he studied Warriors superstar Kevin Durant – “He’s really tall and he can jump, he can dribble, he can shoot. He can do everything” – and also Kings forward Nemanja Bjelica, another native of Serbia.

Asked if he cared to pattern himself after Durant or Bjelica or anyone else, Smailagic wasted no time replying.

“No. I didn’t have that kind of mindset, because I want to play how I play.” 

Warriors' Jordan Poole hopes to make immediate impact in Golden State

Warriors' Jordan Poole hopes to make immediate impact in Golden State

OAKLAND -- The Warriors' newest first-round pick Jordan Poole found himself in rare circumstances Monday afternoon. 

With injuries to Klay Thompson and Kevin Durant, Poole became the first Golden State first-round pick in half a decade to join a team that wasn't a prohibitive title favorite. Particularly given the notable absences on Golden State's roster, Poole hopes to make an immediate impact in his rookie season. 

"It's an amazing organization, I'm just coming in and I know only so little about the entire situation," Poole said during his introductory press conference Monday. "Hopefully, we can find a way to bring everybody back."

Poole -- who the Warriors took 28th overall in last week's NBA draft -- joins Golden State as the franchise ponders its own uncertain future. In the next week, their two top free-agent targets -- Durant and Thompson -- will decide if they'll re-sign with the team. However, both will be expected to sit out most, if not all, of the 2019-20 season with major rehabilitation timetables. The absence of both players, who averaged nearly 47 points per game combined, will leave opportunities for Poole. 

Throughout his collegiate career, Poole proved to be a capable scorer. In his sophomore season at Michigan, he averaged 12.8 points per game, shooting a team-high 37 percent from 3-point range. With the Warriors, Poole believes he can help overcome Golden State's supplemental scoring woes.

"I wouldn't feel pressure," Poole said. "I feel like scoring is a strength of mine and it's something has gotten me to this level and it's upgraded me as an individual so I think that's another reason why they've wanted me here." 

"I have a really good opportunity obviously with Klay out ... but just coming in learning, whether it's in practice and summer league and being a sponge and taking everything in," Poole added. "The opportunity will present itself, but being able to feel like I can make an impact and if there's an opportunity I'm definitely going to try to take it."

Minutes into Poole's press conference, Warriors general manager Bob Myers pointed out the makeshift stage was just under Draymond Green's basket at the practice facility, then gestured across the way to point out Stephen Curry's post-practice basket. The message was simple: Work hard and you will be rewarded. 

“We’ll give you every chance to meet all of your goals and expectations. But most of it is going to be because of the work you put in,” Myers said. 

While a competent scorer, Poole's defense was maligned during his college career. With a habit of ball-watching and poor closeouts, Poole will need to follow a strict learning curve to get on the floor under head coach Steve Kerr. "I think that I know that personally and obviously everyone else knows that as well," Poole admitted. "But it's an improvement that I plan on making. I've made it from high school to freshman year to sophomore year. That just comes with time and physically and your body. I'm still learning my body but it's something I'm working on a lot. Being able to be a two-way player offensively and defensively."

The Warriors are doing their part to make sure Poole is groomed. Just after the rookie was drafted, Green texted Myers conveying his approval of the pick. A week later, Poole walked into Rakuten Performance Center to find that his locker was right next to the former Defensive Player of the Year. Additionally, during the press conference, Poole cited Curry as a player he'd model his game after. In the coming months, it will be Curry, alongside Green, who will mentor the guard as he tries to make a mark in his rookie season.

[RELATED: No shortage of similarities between Draymond, Paschall]

"I think it's a huge compliment that I'm around some of the best offensive players, if not the best offensive players in the game," Poole said. "Night in, night out just practicing against Steph and Klay, being able to just find ways to challenge them and being able to have that experience in practice going throughout the season, it grows. So I think I'm just extremely blessed to be in the situation I'm in."