Warriors

Why Warriors players not in forgiving mood towards media member who stole jacket

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AP

Why Warriors players not in forgiving mood towards media member who stole jacket

OAKLAND -- As much as they enjoy basketball and winning games and entertaining fans, most of the players on the Warriors are willing to remind us they also happen to be acutely aware of life beyond the court.

Real life.

That’s why their unhappiness with KGO-TV sports anchor Mike Shumann doesn’t begin to match their annoyance with attempts to downplay or rationalize his surreptitious behavior that, incidentally, was caught on video.

Shumann, the former 49ers receiver who has been with KGO since 1994, was in San Antonio last week to provide coverage of the Warriors-Spurs playoff series. He was captured on video after practice last Thursday bending over, picking up a jacket, folding it and walking out of AT&T Center. The jacket, it was later, confirmed, belonged to Warriors security manager Ralph Walker, who had not given Shumann permission to take it.

Approached about the incident, Shumann returned the jacket, apologized and also tried to explain his actions, essentially saying he wasn’t thinking clearly.

Insofar as Shumann is a Disney Company employee -- Disney owns ABC and ESPN -- the matter put the Warriors organization in a compromised position. Disney’s contract with the NBA gives ABC affiliates exclusive access on specific telecasts, something the Warriors take seriously. In their attempt to control the damage and preserve status quo with Shumann, they wanted to consider the matter a benign misunderstanding.

As in, he’s a good guy that made a mistake.

The players were not in such a forgiving mood. They urged that action be taken, partly out of loyalty to Walker but largely because of their belief the incident would not have been taken so lightly likely if the jacket had been removed by a person of color.

They smelled a double standard. And while some surely would argue against that, the players have centuries of American history to support their theory. Recent events have unfolded to have that theory reaffirmed.

The Warriors are aware of various social/ethnic inequalities that go unpunished. It’s why some speak out.

They are aware that two black men were handcuffed and taken out of a Philadelphia Starbucks because they’d asked to use the bathroom before buying anything. This was the extent of their “wrongdoing” while awaiting a business meeting.

They are aware that white gunman Dylann Roof unloaded his clip on black churchgoers in South Carolina in 2015, killing nine, and was taken by police to a fast-food restaurant for a snack on the way to jail.

They are aware that a black woman in Alabama, after demanding the phone number of a Waffle House district manager, was tossed to the ground by two white police officers who claimed she dropped an f-bomb.

This occurred hours apart from a shooting at a Tennessee Waffle House, where a white man used an assault rifle to kill four people of color before he was disarmed and forced to flee. It was later reported that the man had gone on a racist rant and threatened black customers in a grocery store without police intervention.

And of course they know the Parkland, Fla. school shooter, a white man who killed 17 with an assault rifle, was captured alive while unarmed Stephon Clark, in Sacramento, killed no one yet was felled by a fusillade of bullets while in his grandmother’s backyard.

It’s hard to know all of this and then fall in line with the contention that Shumann’s actions should be dismissed because, hey, he apologized.

While Shumann’s transgression can’t be considered a serious crime, it most assuredly is a serious breach of protocol.

I’ve been professionally acquainted with Mike for years and had never formed an opinion of his character. I heard what had happened, followed up with a few people and became aware of how the team felt. I saw the video and considered it bizarre behavior on his part.

Maybe that’s all it is. Or maybe there is some medical or psychological explanation.

Some Warriors were merely bothered by the entire episode, others were outraged -- mostly about the attempt to bury it. With social consciousness on the rise in this country, and white privilege being acknowledged as real, the timing of Shumann’s behavior left him exposed to significant backlash.

Double standards beget unrest. Look around and it’s hard to miss. Though the Warriors may not be militant or demonstrative, they are awake enough to see the world as it is and pursue a greater fairness. That’s what they’re seeking.

Steph Curry sheds light on Game 1 trash talk with LeBron James, promises there are 'adversarial relationships' in NBA

Steph Curry sheds light on Game 1 trash talk with LeBron James, promises there are 'adversarial relationships' in NBA

Do you remember what happened with about 35 seconds left in OT during Game 1 of the 2018 NBA Finals?

In case you forgot:

The Warriors led by 11 points and with the shot clock winding down, Steph Curry attempted a driving layup and LeBron James blocked it.

LeBron proceeded to talk some trash to Curry and even used a little forearm to nudge him away when Curry said something in return.

On the most recent episode of The Bill Simmons Podcast, Curry shed some light on the exchange.

Simmons: "He blocked you and he talked sh*t to you. I thought you guys were gonna fight."

Curry: "It was never going to spill over to that. But it was an interesting moment ... I was hot because I was trying to finish out a possession, I think it was less than a minute left, I didn't see him coming over from the weak side so I tried to do a little soft scoop layup and he pinned it. Then he stared me down and he said something to me.

"And I was like, 'That's what we're really on right now? We're about to win and you're worried about mean-blocking my shot and talking trash?' And then the whole Tristan and Draymond thing happened and I went back up to him and I was like, 'Yo, what's up? Is this really what we're about right now?'

"And he was like, 'I gotta do that to make sure my teammates know I'm a mentor' and it's a part of his leadership and that type of deal. And I was like, 'I don't want to be the sacrificial lamb for your leadership.' (laughter). Come on man, that's messed up."

Simmons: "I want more of it. I don't want you guys to like each other. This is my biggest problem with this decade. I like that I'm not positive you and LeBron like each other (Curry starts laughing). Watching from afar, it doesn't seem like you like each other. I'm sure there's a mutual respect."

Curry: "There's definitely a mutual respect. I would say though when you see guys working out with each other in the summers and you see guys playing pickup and all that -- when you step foot on the court during the season, it's a totally different environment.

"Guys can be buddies and friends and whatnot and have whatever type of relationship they want to have in the summer and off the court, but the rivalry and competition and egos and all that stuff that lives in an NBA game and when you're trying to hold that trophy ... it's really there and it's not going anywhere."

Simmons: "I don't want you guys to get along. I want adverserial relationships."

Curry: "They're there. They're there. I promise you."

Good. That is awesome.

A couple other takeaways from the podcast:

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller

Steph Curry unveils story behind why the Wolves didn't draft him: 'I hope it's true because that's hilarious'

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AP

Steph Curry unveils story behind why the Wolves didn't draft him: 'I hope it's true because that's hilarious'

With the fifth pick in the 2009 NBA Draft, the Minnesota Timberwolves select... Ricky Rubio.

With the sixth pick in the 2009 NBA Draft, the Minnesota Timberwolves select... Jonny Flynn.

With the seventh pick in the 2009 NBA Draft, the Golden State Warriors select... Stephen Curry.

And the rest is history.

As you all know, the man in charge of those selections -- David Kahn -- was fired in 2013 and no longer works in the NBA.

"My guy David Kahn. I don't know where he's at right now," Curry said on The Bill Simmons Podcast. "I don't know if that ever came out -- there's a story. Everybody knows how much I love golf -- play it in my spare time and what not.

"I think the word on the street was that he didn't draft me because in Minnesota it's cold and I wouldn't be able to play as much golf so I would have been miserable."

A shocked Simmons asked Curry: "Is that true?"

"I hope it's true because that's hilarious (laughter)," Curry said. "That's hilarious."

To which Simmons responded: "It was idiotic in the moment. I did a draft diary. I was going nuts. Because if you're gonna take two point guards, how are you not one of the two? And then if you're gonna go all-in on Rubio and you don't even know if he's gonna come over..."

Rubio didn't leave Spain for the NBA until the 2011-12 season, and a hip injury unfortunately ended Flynn's career after just two plus seasons.

There's no way we will ever find out if that golf story is true, but just like Steph... we certainly hope it is.

Drew Shiller is the co-host of Warriors Outsiders. Follow him on Twitter @DrewShiller