Bruins

Bruins sign depth players Kenny Agostino, Paul Postma to one-year, one-way deals

Bruins sign depth players Kenny Agostino, Paul Postma to one-year, one-way deals

BRIGHTON, Mass – The Bruins made offers and held discussions for bigger, better players leading up to the July 1 opening of free agency in the NHL, but at the end of Saturday came away with a pair of depth signings that offer zero risk and little cost. The Bruins signed AHL MVP Kenny Agostino ($875,000) and Winnipeg Jets defenseman Paul Postma ($725,000) to one-year, one-way deals with each of the two contracts coming in at well under $1 million in salary.

“Have we made offers? Have we explored? Yeah, we have – on both fronts, through trade or putting out offers. But, as I teed up [on Friday], I didn’t think it was necessarily going to happen and it didn’t,” said Bruins GM Don Sweeney. “We made offers to players that signed elsewhere, again, for different reasons. That’s entirely up to the player themselves, whether the term wasn’t right or the dollars weren’t right or the location wasn’t right.”

The Bruins also signed Providence Bruins forward Jordan Szwarz to a one-year, two-way deal worth $650,000 at the NHL after he enjoyed an excellent season with the P-Bruins.

The Bruins didn’t come away with anything that’s going to demonstrably move the needle at the NHL level, but they made signings that provide good insurance for the B’s if injuries crop up, or if Boston’s prospects show they aren’t quite ready for prime time.

The 25-year-old Agostino, a Yale teammate of B’s defenseman Robbie O’Gara, was named the American Hockey League MVP in 2016-17 after posting 24 goals while leading the AHL with 59 assists and 83 points in 65 games with the Chicago Wolves. The 6-foot-1, 200-pounder also appeared in seven NHL games with the St. Louis Blues in 2016-17 and posted a goal and three points, and has played in 17 NHL games during his three-year pro career.

“He’s been prolific in the AHL over the last couple of years. Our guys have followed players of that nature and felt that he really deserves an opportunity to play at the NHL level and put forth his skillset that he’s displayed there,” said Sweeney. “Even in a small sample size at the NHL, he’s done well. So, we’re going to give him an opportunity. I think the internal competition piece I spoke of [at forward positions] will be interesting come training camp.”

The 28-year-old Postma played a career-high 65 games last season for the Winnipeg Jets and finished with a goal and 14 points, and has appeared in 191 games over the last seven seasons for the Atlanta Thrashers and Winnipeg Jets. He’s got good size at 6-foot-3, 190-pounds, has a big shot from the point and can play both sides in the kind of versatile package that will make a pretty solid seventh defenseman-type for the Black and Gold.

“Paul still has got upside. If you look at his power play stuff that he’s done in the minors and what he’s been able to accomplish – he’s got a big, heavy shot. [Winnipeg was] heavy on the right side, we’re heavy on the right side. I talked to him yesterday,” said Sweeney. “He played a lot of hockey with [Michael] Stone in junior on the left side. He feels there is versatility in his game. He was excited about our organization and having a bit of a fresh start.”

Sweeney indicated that there could be more signings or trades in the second or third waves of free agency now that the July 1 frenzy is over and done with, but it’s Agostino and Postma that the Bruins had to show for when the dust settled on Day One of free agency.  

Morning Skate: Is it time for the Bruins to regret giving up on Colin Miller?

cp-morning-skate.jpg
File Photo

Morning Skate: Is it time for the Bruins to regret giving up on Colin Miller?

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while preparing for some late night Bruins hockey this week.

*So now Colin Miller is a top pairing D-man for the Vegas Golden Knights, and it sure looks like he’s effective at least from a fancy stats perspective. This was always the danger in making a talented young D-man like Miller available in the expansion draft, and instead protecting a limited stay-at-home guy like Kevan Miller. Is it okay to second guess the Bruins on this one? I definitely think so, but the Bruins also knew that McAvoy was going to be their top guy and that Brandon Carlo was going to be their top-4 shutdown guy with Miller as the perfect bottom pairing D-man. Could you have traded Carlo, kept Miller and then simply found a stay-at-home guy for the left side kind of line John Moore is now after signing him for five years? Sure they could have. That’s where the regret and the lament come into play after watching him blossom into a very effective player in Vegas.

*Elias Pettersson is the latest example of the NHL’s failure to protect their star players from concussion-type injuries.

*Lars Eller is kind of turning into a bit of a punk. He was the guy that celebrated in front of the Bruins bench on opening night causing a reaction from Brad Marchand, and now he’s talking smack about Toronto’s top players.

*The Rangers are at least in the “win” column now, but it still looks like they are a long way away from anything but a rebuild.

*It’s just a matter of time for Sidney Crosby to get going offensively after a slow start with the Pittsburgh Penguins.

*For something completely different: Could the Avengers 4 trailer be coming soon? I certainly hope so. I also still hope it’s called Avengers 4: End Game.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Celtics easily on your device.

NBC SPORTS BOSTON SCHEDULE

Live stream: Here's where to watch Boston Bruins vs. Calgary Flames

brad-marchand-bruins-flames-2-19-18-usat.jpg
File photo

Live stream: Here's where to watch Boston Bruins vs. Calgary Flames

The Bruins begin a four-game road trip tonight in Calgary with a 9 p.m. game against the Flames. Here's how to watch:

LIVE STREAM: Click here for the NBC Sports Network broadcast of the game

MORE BRUINS