Bruins

Bruins

BOSTON – David Pastrnak is usually the brightest light with the Boston Bruins.

The 20-year-old is quick with jokes and smiles, and bubbles with the same kind of energy off the ice that he exudes on it as an electric offensive force of nature for the B’s capable of scoring and making plays in bunches. The joy and the enthusiasm for the game, and for life in general, is always present with the young right winger.

But all of that was replaced with what looked like overriding guilt and emotion after the winger had taken a holding call on Clarke MacArthur in overtime that led to Ottawa’s game-winning PP goal in a 3-2 win in Game 6 at TD Garden that officially eliminated the Black and Gold from the postseason. Bruins fans at the Garden didn’t like the call and let the referees know their displeasure, but afterward Bruce Cassidy backed up the officials that was the right call on a play where Pastrnak was trying to hustle and back-check, and simply got too overzealous with a crafty veteran looking to work a penalty call.

“It was a good call. It looked like, from my vantage point, that Pasta [David Pastrnak] was trying to backtrack and help on the back-check and got tangled up with [MacArthur],” said Cassidy. “So it’s a tough one to overlook. We just didn’t get it done on the penalty kill.”

Pastrnak took responsibility for what looked like a rare competent call from the on-ice officials in the series after hauling down MacArthur in the Boston zone, and looked pretty upset after watching his team fall from the penalty box.

 

“It’s still hockey,” said Pastrnak, using one of the phrases he’s had ready when asked about this being his first Stanley Cup playoff experience. “There were obviously guys in the game from both teams and there were more blocked shots, and everything. So obviously it’s really tough, but it’s good experience.”

It wasn’t a particularly stellar night for Pastrnak with just a couple of shots on net and three giveaways to go along with the overtime penalty, and it surely was a step down from a very strong Game 5 performance in Ottawa. Still, his teammates didn’t want the enthusiastic 20-year-old blaming himself for the playoff loss after a brilliant breakout season where he finished with 34 goals and 70 points in becoming one of the best young offensive players in the NHL.

“He’s back-checking and trying to battle and then a tough play gets a penalty called. So I understand his situation [of feeling like it’s his fault] but we are a team,” said Tuukka Rask. “It’s never about one guy, winning or losing, so he’ll be fine. Nobody is blaming him. It’s just one of those that ended up costing us, so it sucks.”

It will probably suck for a long time this offseason when Pastrnak thinks about how things ended in the playoffs for him, but it should also light a fire when he returns to Boston next season as a 21-year-old ready to continue dominating for the Black and Gold.