Red Sox

Drellich: Price would do more for teammates by winning, not yelling

Drellich: Price would do more for teammates by winning, not yelling

NEW YORK — Thin skin, thinner performances. 

What, if anything, did David Price actually accomplish in New York?

It is possible the Red Sox lefty earned greater respect from teammates because he loudly and obnoxiously handled media members, including this one. Because he put on a little show for some in the clubhouse. 

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If he wanted complete privacy while airing out complaints with a reporter, he could have found it. He didn’t seek it. 

A few curse words — who knows, maybe they’re followed by a few high fives from some teammates. 

Us vs. them, right?

But the us-vs.-them that really matters, or should matter, for an ace is beating American League East opponents. It’s winning rubber matches against the first-place Yankees.

In discussing Price and his media confrontations before Thursday’s game, Sox manager John Farrell highlighted Price’s role in his clubhouse.

"Here’s the thing, David Price is one hell of a teammate,” Farrell said in his daily pre-game press conference. “He’s a very strong competitor. The support he gives his teammates in the clubhouse and that dugout is outstanding. And it’s returned to him. I think he genuinely appreciates competing with the Red Sox, the city of Boston and going out and working with his teammates to compete to win a championship.”

Farrell echoed a similar sentiment in a conversation with the Globe’s Nick Cafardo

“That’s a situation that’s clearly between he and Evan,” Farrell told Cafardo separately on Thursday. “David is a great teammate. He’s a strong, strong competitor and does his job the best he can.”

So ripping media members is about being a good teammate?

It’s hard to fathom that every person in the Sox clubhouse thinks Price’s unrelenting, self-created drama is beneficial for the ultimate goal of, you know, winning.

Gary Sanchez, who homered twice off Price in a 9-1 loss, is the competition that matters most. Not the people with the pens and microphones.

Teammates probably would have chosen support on the mound rather than verbal support in a visiting clubhouse hallway, if given a choice.

When asked if Wednesday night affected his performance Thursday, Price said absolutely not. It’s irrelevant, in a way. Price looks bad, whether there’s any actual correlation between how angry he was a night before he lasted just five innings and allowed six runs.

Brush back beat writers and columnists, then kneel before the Bronx Bombers.

The ace might have given his teammates something they valued in New York. It wasn’t what they needed most.

Rafael Devers' 30th homer a milestone on a couple of fronts for Red Sox

Rafael Devers' 30th homer a milestone on a couple of fronts for Red Sox

Rafael Devers broke up Jeff Samardjiza's no-hitter at Fenway Park on Wednesday night in a big way.

The Red Sox third baseman sent a line drive into the right-field seats in the sixth inning after the San Francisco Giants right-hander had worked 5 2/3 no-hit innings. It was home run No. 30 for Devers, a career-high for the 22-year-old third baseman, and it gave him and teammate Xander Bogaerts a remarkable distinction.

Bogaerts (31 homers, 50 doubles) and Devers, who also has 50 doubles, are the first teammates to reach the 30-50 mark in the same season in MLB history.

It also gives the Red Sox three 30-home run hitters (J.D. Martinez has a team-leading 35) and Mookie Betts is closing in on the mark with 28. If Betts (out with a foot injury) can get there, it would be the first Red Sox team with four 30-homer hitters. 

Devers tied Butch Hobson (1977) for most homers by a Red Sox third baseman and joins an exclusive group with 30 homers, 100 RBI and 100 runs scored before turning 23:

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Red Sox legend Carl Yastrzemski throws first pitch to grandson in awesome moment

Red Sox legend Carl Yastrzemski throws first pitch to grandson in awesome moment

This week has been very special for the Yastrzemski family.

Boston Red Sox legend Carl Yastrzemski's grandson, Mike, made his Fenway Park debut Tuesday night as a member of the San Francisco Giants. The younger Yastrzemski even hit a home run in the Giants' 7-6 loss in 15 innings.

Wednesday provided the family with another moment it will never forget. Carl threw out the first pitch with Mike doing the catching. The embrace between them after the pitch made for one of the most heartwarming scenes of the 2019 season. 

Check it out in the videos below:

Baseball is very much a sport that connects generations, and this moment is a great example. 

Mike Yastrzemski is in his rookie season for the Giants and has provided some much-needed power at the plate. The 29-year-old right fielder is batting .266 with 20 home runs and 52 RBI in 97 games.

Alex Cora explains why Red Sox shut down David Price>>>

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