Patriots

Amendola: Pats' turmoil overblown, but Butler benching remains a mystery

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Amendola: Pats' turmoil overblown, but Butler benching remains a mystery

First things first. All that talk about turmoil in Foxboro?

Overblown.

"There's not really much truth to [the rumors that there was a ton of turmoil inside the walls], to tell you the truth," said ex-Patriots and current Miami wide receiver Danny Amendola. "There is always going to be some friction between a coach and a player in a business."

Second things second. The talk that there's been no explanation as to why Malcolm Butler was benched in the Super Bowl, and that the players -- or at least this player -- remain baffled by it?

Not overblown.

"I don't know the answer to [why that happened] to this day . . . " said Amendola. "[For] whatever reason, [Bill Belichick] felt, you know, he's the coach. I can't make that decision. I can only do my job and focus on my job.

"But in hindsight, it's like, 'Really, what agenda are we on?' It's something that I will probably never really understand."

Amendola said all this, and much more, on Barstool Sports' Comeback SZN Podcast with Kayce Smith, formerly of NBC Sports Boston. Amendola -- who played five years in New England before signing as a free agent with the Dolphins this past offseason -- gave a fascinating glimpse behind the Patriots' iron curtain.

Like when he signed with the Pats on March 13, 2013:

The realization he was headed to New England "set in when Bill called . . . and said, 'Get your ass to Foxboro and ink this up . . . we're not having a press conference, we don't give a [crap] about that.' Then I realized [New England] was all work, no glitz. No glamour. It's just about playing good football, the Patriot Way."

And what it was like with the Pats:

"I got to understand what it was like to put the work in and really grind it out . . . and learn how to win. When I was in St. Louis" -- Amendola played for the Rams from 2009-12, when the team went 17-46-1 and was below .500 every year -- "I learned that wins are hard to come by in the NFL . . . but sometimes we'd win in New England and [Belichick] wasn't happy. Tom [Brady] wasn't happy. Or we knew we could play better here or play better there. I learned how to win and how to play and what it meant to play good football."

Did he enjoy it?

"I have mixed feelings about business is done," he admitted.

However . . . 

"I got to play for the greatest coach of time, [with] the greatest quarterback of all time and [for] one of the greatest owners of all time (in Robert Kraft). I got to understand what it was like to put the work in and really grind it out . . . and learn how to win."

Some of the other things he had to say . . 

On the difference between Belichick and his new coach, Adam Gase: "Adam Gase is one of the guys. He's our leader. He's our head coach, but he's also our boy. It's cool. It's refreshing to have that kind of relationship with a coach, which is something that I haven't had in a long time. You want to fight hard [for a coach like that]. Back in New England, it was almost like you've got a principal and a principal's office and [stuff] like that. You know, in a good way. And in a bad way, too."

On how playing with Tom Brady impacted his career: "Tom is not only a great football player, but he makes every one on his team better around him. He's created a lifestyle for himself and diet and the way he approaches the game on and off the field around the clock. . . . he's preparing his body. He's really instilled that in me. I've watched him do it for five years. That's inadvertently changed that way I approach the game."

More on the Patriots' reported turmoil: "Personally, I can't speak for Tom or Bill. But I know that regardless of business -- and I have mixed feelings of how business is done [in New England] -- I know for a fact that Coach Belichick is one of the best coaches of all time. He has all of his players' respect. I know Tom would say that same thing. I know [Rob Gronkowski] would say the same thing, regardless of how they feel about their contracts or certain situation or whatever may be going down." 

On his favorite off-the-field memoires as a Patriot: "[Going] to the [Kentucky] Derby every year after we won the Super Bowl with Tom was fun . . . we'd gas up the jet and we'd get down there and four or five Louisville cops would pick us up. We could literally do whatever we wanted with cops by our side . . . of course, Gronk and [Julian Edelman] being there (spices things) up a bit. And when you're with Brady, every head in the building turns. He changes the energy in any room. It's fun. It's adult fun.

"I went to the Derby twice and I don't think I saw a horse one time. [Wes] Welker, one year, brought in a boombox.. We created our own club vibe in there. Wes brought like $500,000 in fake 20s and 100s stacked it up on the table and everybody thought it was real money . . . Another year, we had a karaoke machine. And this is like in the most distinguished area of the Derby. People are suited and booted . . . and we have a karaoke machine. Travis Tritt was there . . . and he sang 'Sweet Home Alabama'. It was awesome. It was electric."

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Kraft reportedly close to investing in Spanish soccer team

Kraft reportedly close to investing in Spanish soccer team

Will Patriots owner Robert Kraft soon match Red Sox principal owner John Henry by investing in a European soccer team of his own?

According to Spanish media reports, Kraft is close to buying a stake in the Spanish soccer club Sevilla of LaLiga. Spanish radio network COPE reports that the sale of a 40 percent share of the team to a "U.S investment group" could come this week.

More from the website SoccerEx:

Kraft, who is chairman and chief executive of the Kraft Group, is apparently leading this consortium, possibly through an investment company called 'Sevillistas Unidos 2020’.

The Patriots were valued at $3.7 billion - the second-most valuable NFL franchise behind the Dallas Cowboys - in the latest Forbes ranking of world sports franchises. European soccer teams hold three of the top five spots.

In 2005, Kraft considered purchasing English Premier League team Liverpool FC, which was purchased by Henry's group in 2010.

The Kraft group also own the New England Revolution of MLS and the Boston esports franchise in the Overwatch League.

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Revis votes himself off the island, retires after 11 seasons

Revis votes himself off the island, retires after 11 seasons

After 11 seasons, Revis Island is officially closed.

Former Patriot cornerback Darrelle Revis announced his retirement from the NFL via Instagram on Wednesday, ending his career after 11 years with four teams, including two stints totaling eight seasons with the New York Jets.

"It has truly been an honor to showcase one of my greatest gifts to the world,” Revis wrote. “Today I am closing a chapter of my life that I once dreamed as a kid and I am officially retiring from the National Football League."

Revis, who turned 33 July 14, was a key member of New England’s Super Bowl XLIX winning team that beat the Seattle Seahawks in 2015. Last season, he appeared in six games for the Kansas City Chiefs, including the playoffs, before being released in February.

After being released by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in March 2014, Revis signed a one-year deal worth $12 million to play in New England and earned first-team All-Pro honors in his only season in Foxboro. He then signed a five-year, $70 million contract to return to the Jets in March 2015.

Here's the Jets' statement on Revis' retirement:

While he won his lone championship in a Patriots uniform, Revis found most of his individual success playing for the Jets, who drafted the corner 14th overall out of the University of Pittsburgh in 2007.

A seven-time Pro Bowl and four-time first-team All-Pro selection, Revis’ ability to shut down opponents top receivers one-on-one earned him the “Revis Island” moniker.

Widely considered one of the greatest cornerbacks in NFL history, Revis finished his career with 29 interceptions, tied for 225th all-time, a testament to how much quarterbacks avoided throwing near him. 

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