Bruins

Brad Marchand on Game 7 loss to Blues: 'They just took our dream from us'

Brad Marchand on Game 7 loss to Blues: 'They just took our dream from us'

BOSTON – Charlie McAvoy had one word to describe the emotion that he was going through after the Bruins' season had officially ended with a 4-1 loss to the St. Louis Blues in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final.

“Devastating,” said McAvoy, without even a hint of an elaboration.

It was a tough scene in the TD Garden home dressing room on Wednesday night after the Bruins played a dud of a Game 7 in which they were outplayed during 5-on-5 play by a strong, determined St. Louis bunch and watched rookie upstart Jordan Binnington outplay goalie Tuukka Rask between the pipes.

Grizzled veterans like Zdeno Chara and Brad Marchand were even on the verge of tears while discussing the final defeat, and Marchand admitted the Game 7 loss was the worst setback of his brilliant Bruins career. Second-year winger Jake DeBrusk sat dejected in the home dressing room with a towel on the back of his head and didn’t say word to anybody while the media was conducting interviews.

“It’s tough to describe that heartbreak, but you know, we worked hard. It just didn’t go our way,” said Marchand, who didn’t factor offensively and had a key mistake for the B’s when he left the ice for a line change just ahead of the Blues' second goal of the first period. “You never know when you’ll get that chance again. It could be the last one for all of us, but yeah, you know, when you’re that close and it doesn’t happen, it hurts.

“[There’s] disbelief that it didn't come together. That’s not how you plan it out. It’s heartbreak. It’s tough to describe. You know, they just took our dream, our lifetime dream from us, and everything we’ve worked for our entire lives. It was 60 minutes away from that. You can’t describe it.”

It was the lowest the Bruins' dressing room has been morale-wise since they lost four straight games in the second round of the 2010 playoffs to blow a 3-0 series lead against the Philadelphia Flyers. The Bruins were disappointed they lost the Stanley Cup Final in 2013 to the Chicago Blackhawks, to be sure, but it wasn’t the kind of shell-shocked, stunned and raw emotion that was on display after Wednesday night’s game.

The Bruins thought they were going to ultimately prevail against the Blues over the last few weeks, but instead they fell short in a Game 7 that several of the B’s termed the worst loss of their long, accomplished careers.

“We haven’t been in the Final in a long time. Felt like it was there for us. I believed in this group every single game,” said David Krejci. “I had a good feeling. Even after the first period I felt a comeback. So, yeah, that’s a really tough one. [It is] definitely the hardest loss in my career, for sure.”

Most of the Bruins admitted they were never going to get over the bitter taste of a Game 7 loss in the Stanley Cup Final on home ice, and that’s understandable given where players like Patrice Bergeron, Marchand, Krejci and Chara are at this point in their career. The bright side is that the Bruins took a huge step forward following that 2010 series loss in the second round to the Flyers, and it played a major role in the Black and Gold winning the Cup in 2011.

Perhaps history can repeat itself as the Bruins look to parlay disappointment into success for the regular season next year, and use the loser’s motivation to take them higher and deeper into the postseason standings next season.

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Is Nick Ritchie a better player than Danton Heinen?

Is Nick Ritchie a better player than Danton Heinen?

The Boston Bruins didn't make the big splash that some Bruins fans were hoping that they'd make ahead of the NHL trade deadline. But they did make a smaller move to fill a need ahead of their 2020 postseason run.

Before the deadline passed, the Bruins made another trade with the Anaheim Ducks. After trading for Ondrej Kase during the weekend, they were able to swing a deal that brought Nick Ritchie to the Bruins and sent Danton Heinen to the Ducks.

In the wake of the trade, there was some debate about if the Bruins actually got an upgrade for their team. That was a hot topic on NBC Sports' NHL trade deadline show, and our own Joe Haggerty and DJ Bean debated the merits of the trade.

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Bean, for one, was not impressed with the deal and actually thought that Ritchie was a downgrade for the team.

Is he better than Danton Heinen? No. Danton Heinen hasn't even been that good, and you still downgraded. This was a salary dump, I understand you want to save money and you do save money and you get some of the money back that you're paying to get rid of David Backes along with a first-round pick and a prospect. Now you're basically giving away your first-round pick, a prospect, and Danton Heinen and are getting a fourth-liner back.

Haggerty fought back against that notion, saying that Ritchie may actually find a way to impact the game, something that Heinen struggled to do all too often during his time with the Bruins.

How on God's green earth is Danton Heinen better than Nick Ritchie when Ritchie has more goals, averages more points per game, he has twice as many hits. He's actually someone you notice during the game from time to time throwing a hit or actually putting his body in front of the net. We never notice Danton Heinen doing anything when we watch him play.

There will only be one way to actually know which player will end up fitting in better with the Bruins. And that will involve seeing how Ritchie fares for the B's and how they do without Heinen.

For more of Haggerty, Bean, and Tom Giles' thoughts on the NHL trade deadline, check out the video above or head over to YouTube to watch the full clip.

It may not have been dazzling, but the Bruins addressed a big, heavy need with Nick Ritchie dea

It may not have been dazzling, but the Bruins addressed a big, heavy need with Nick Ritchie dea

BRIGHTON, Mass – The Bruins finally responded to the lack of size and heaviness that’s existed as one of the few real, undeniable weak spots for their hockey club over the last few seasons.

Out went 6-foot-1, 186-pound Danton Heinen after never really playing to his size or offensive skill level after a strong rookie season. And in comes newly acquired 6-foot-2, 234-pound Nick Ritchie from the Anaheim Ducks in a 1-for-1 trade on deadline day.

Ritchie is a former top-10 draft pick that’s averaged 11 goals and 29 points in Anaheim over the last three seasons while not exactly playing for an offensive powerhouse. The deadline day deal wasn’t done to provide the Bruins with offense, though, as much as it was executed to bring the Bruins size, strength and heaviness up front. With Ritchie, the Bruins are a better equipped to adequately deal with the big, deep and strong teams like Tampa Bay, Washington and maybe even St. Louis that they may face in the playoffs.

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It’s an admission from the Bruins that they needed more physicality and muscle among their forward group after watching the players on the ice get pushed around by the Blues in last season’s Stanley Cup Final and pushed around one too many times by the Capitals over the last handful of seasons as well.

Bruins general manager Don Sweeney alluded to glaring roster need while discussing the deal with the media on Monday afternoon. To that end Ritchie also said he plans to bring the “big game” of net-front presence, hitting and gritty play along the boards with him to Boston. And that’s exactly what his job description is going to require.

“It was an area that we felt we needed to address from some interior ice play, size and strength, net-front play, contested puck battles. [These are] things that we feel Nick will bring to the table for us,” said Sweeney. “He’s done it in Anaheim and we think he’ll address some of those needs for us moving forward.

“Where [the Bruins players] were last year in a Game 7 and where they are this year, they should be proud of themselves. But if you have opportunities where you can address areas of need with your group then you have to do it. Secondary scoring is always so important and we believe Ondrej [Kase] will provide some of that. If [Ritchie] goes in and plays with Charlie Coyle then those are two big guys that are going to be hard to contain.”

There’s no doubt the Bruins are better on the ice after essentially trading a first round pick, David Backes, Danton Heinen and Axel Andersson to Anaheim in exchange for Ondrej Kase and Nick Ritchie, and they also shaved upwards of $3 million off their salary cap for next season as well. The extra cap space will be a massive, long-term roster-building factor when it comes to re-signing both Torey Krug and Jake DeBrusk.

But that’s a story for another day with the Bruins attempting to keep up with teams like the Lightning, Penguins and Capitals that were very active improving their teams ahead of the trade deadline.

The immediate impact will make the Bruins a tougher team to play against with a little more diversity among their winger options from game-to-game and opponent-to-opponent. They can go the speed route with a player like Karson Kuhlman against the faster, more skilled teams, or they can go the big, heavy and physical route with Ritchie against heavier match-ups around the league that turn into punishing grudge matches in the postseason.

That’s an important difference from last year’s group where it felt like the Bruins roster was built for regular season success with a dominant Perfection Line, great special teams play and an elite goaltending duo that led them to the postseason. They have the speed, skill and special teams game down to a scientific winning formula.

This season they are still built for the regular season with the same group of impressive strengths. But now, it feels like they are also a little more prepped for nasty, physical playoff battles where big bodies and bad attitudes are often needed.

It remains to be seen how it will all play out for the Black and Gold when they attempt to get through the Eastern Conference playoff gauntlet. But at long last it seems like this trade deadline shows that the Bruins decision-makers learned from what caused them to fall a little short of their goals last spring, and they’re not going to get fooled again.