Bruins

Bruins outlast Devils in 11-round shootout

Bruins outlast Devils in 11-round shootout

NEWARK, N.J. -- By his own admission, Charlie McAvoy does not have a bag of tricks that he can use in the shootout.

And the Boston Bruins may hope it stays that way.

"I can't say I was expecting that," Patrice Bergeron said of McAvoy's backhand goal scored in the 11th round of the shootout to lift the Boston Bruins to a 3-2 win over the New Jersey Devils on Wednesday night.

The goal was McAvoy's first ever in the shootout at the NHL level. Prior to this game, the Bruins had only been in one shootout this season.

"He's so skilled and it's hard on goalies, especially when they don't know the tendencies of the player they're facing," Bergeron said. "It was a great move and I was relieved that it was over with."

That the game reached the shootout was due in large part to Anton Khudobin, who made 40 saves as Boston improved to 9-7-4 with its third straight win-all with Khudobin in goal.

"Hard work pays off," Khudobin said. "When guys are playing like this, blocking shots ... there will always be positive results."

Jake DeBrusk and Patrice Bergeron scored first period goals for the Bruins.

The Bruins weren't the only team who left feeling good about their performance. Even though New Jersey has dropped three of its last five in falling to 12-5-4, collectively the Devils felt they deserved a better outcome.

"I thought we deserved a better outcome," New Jersey coach John Hynes said.

Jesper Bratt and Brian Gibbons scored for the Devils, and Cory Schneider made 27 saves.

The shootout opened with Hall and David Pastrnak trading goals. And it stayed that way until McAvoy's game-winner.

"(Schneider) was challenging," McAvoy said. "I thought maybe if he was out far I could try and pull it by him."

Prior to the extra period, the first of three regular season meetings between the longtime Eastern Conference rivals was essentially a special teams affair.

Despite not scoring on their four power plays and surrendering a man advantage goal to the Devils, it was the Bruins who left with two points thanks to two first period even strength strikes and the play of their ostensible backup goaltender.

The Bruins struck first when rookie left winger DeBrusk opened the scoring with his fifth of the season with a shot from the right circle at 1:25. And Bergeron added to Boston's lead with his fifth of the season at 11:02.

"Give Boston credit," Hynes said. "They came out hard. Unfortunately for us we made a couple mistakes early and they (scored) on (them)."

The Bruins had a two-goal lead and Khudobin, who made his third straight start, tried to make it hold up with a pad save on a Nico Hischier break-in with and a diving stop on Travis Zajac in a span of 1:13. But there was nothing he could do on Bratt's power play goal with 2:50 left as New Jersey's rookie right winger lifted a loose puck in the slot to halve the deficit while Brian Boyle was tied up with Zdeno Chara in front of Khudobin. A video review upheld the goal.

The game remained 2-1 until the Devils equalized on Gibbons' top-of-the-crease deflection with 4:44 left in regulation. Up to that point, though, Khudobin was the story as the netminder stopped a Blake Coleman shorthanded attempt with 10:35 left in the second. Khudobin also benefitted from Hischier, the first overall pick in last June's NHL draft, losing control of the puck alongside the goal line late in the period. Midway through the third, Khudobin stoned Hischier from the top of the crease.

"He's been playing great hockey," McAvoy said of Khudobin. "He gave us a chance tonight when they were putting the pressure on."

The Devils outshot the Bruins, 42-29.

NOTES: Prior to the game, New Jersey announced RW Kyle Palmieri would miss 4-6 weeks with a broken right foot, suffered in the Devils' 4-3 overtime win in Minnesota Monday. The team later announced Palmieri had been placed on the injured reserve retroactive to Monday. .New Jersey scratched D Dalton Prout and RW Stefan Noesen. .Bruins C Ryan Spooner dressed for the first time since suffering a torn right adductor on Oct. 15. .Boston scratched LW Matt Beleskey, D Torey Krug and D Paul Postma. ...The Bruins did not have LW Anders Bjork (undisclosed), LW Brad Marchand (upper body injury), RW David Backes (colon surgery) and D Adam McQuaid (broken right fibula). ... Boston announced RW Jordan Szwarz had been sent down to AHL Providence. ...The Devils announced Friday's home game against Vancouver will coincide with the team hosting the NHL and NHLPA "joint initiative Hockey Fights Cancer" as part of the "annual Cancer Awareness Month."

UP NEXT

Bruins: Host Pittsburgh Friday afternoon.

Devils: Host Vancouver Friday night.

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Morning Skate: Isles may not let Tavares get away

Morning Skate: Isles may not let Tavares get away

Here are all the links from around the hockey world and what I’m reading while wishing happy trails to Hanley Ramirez.

*It sounds like the New York Islanders are strongly in the game for retaining John Tavares after bringing Lou Lamoriello into the hockey operations fold. They will be joining a number of other teams including the Maple Leafs, Buffalo Sabres and others. Do I expect the Bruins to be in the running for Tavares? Not unless they could find a taker for David Krejci. I don’t see that as a very likely scenario this offseason, just as I didn’t see it as a very likely scenario the past couple of years as well. Krejci’s got a big cap hit, he’s well past 30 when teams tend to steer clear of expensive players and he’s logged some heavy miles in his time with the Bruins. Those are the not the kind of players that teams are looking for even with his excellent playoff credentials and a distinct lack of frontline centers around the league.

*The Golden Knights vs. the Washington Capitals in the Stanley Cup Final is a win-win for hockey fans looking for a good series, says the Hockey News.

*This may be the first and last time that FOH (Friend of Haggs) Greg Wyshynski gets a return tweet from Satan, Miroslav Satan that is.

*Things continue to speed up in Pittsburgh as trade rumors are swirling with Phil Kessel in what looks like it’s going to be a turbulent end to his run with the Penguins. Correct me if I’m wrong, but it seems like Mr. Kessel has worn out his welcome at just about every stop along the way in his NHL tour over the last 10 plus years.

*Interesting profile on NHL commissioner Gary Bettman, who continues to tailor his entire life around running the National Hockey League and guiding it to its highest popularity and business levels in league history.

*For something completely different: It’s a little surprising here as the Red Sox and Hanley Ramirez are parting ways with the DH getting designated for assignment by the Sox.

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A look at Bruins in free agency: Rick Nash

A look at Bruins in free agency: Rick Nash

By all accounts, the trade for power forward Rick Nash at the deadline should have worked out splendidly for the Bruins.

Nash, 33, is a proven NHL goal-scorer, a skilled big body. He fit the profile of previous Bruins Milan Lucic, Jarome Iginla and Nathan Horton, who achieved big-time success with David Krejci in the past. Nash certainly looked as if he was going to be an impact player for the Black and Gold when he posted a couple of goals and a whopping 23 shots on net in his first four games after getting traded from the New York Rangers for Ryan Spooner, a 2018 first-round pick and Ryan Lindgren among other assets.

But the production slackened as the games rolled on, and Nash eventually was dinged up with a concussion that ended his regular season. The big right winger returned for the playoffs and even had a two-goal game against the Tampa Bay Lightning in Game 1 of the second round, but Nash couldn’t consistently provide offensive punch on Boston’s second line. 

In that respect, Nash’s three goals and five points, along with his minus-7 rating in 12 playoff games, were a pretty big disappointment given the assets surrendered to acquire him. The 6-foot-4, 220-pounder was brought in to help avoid situations like the four consecutive playoff losses to the Lightning, where the Bruins couldn’t muster any even strength offense up front from their forward group.

Rather than label Nash a disappointment, however, the Bruins looked at his playoff performance as one that was irreparably harmed by a concussion right in the middle of everything. Clearly, it would have been difficult for any player to hit the ground running right at the start of the playoffs, and Riley Nash suffered from the same kind of issue when he jumped into the postseason after his own concussion issues as well.

“It’s unfortunate that [Nash] got banged up near the end of the season there, and it really took him a while to get back. I don’t think he was himself. He said that during the exit meetings that he wasn’t quite himself. It’s disappointing because we felt we had a guy that was really going to help our secondary scoring and that line and help David [Krejci] get going in some offensive situations,” said Bruins team president Cam Neely. “You could see the big body and how he protects the puck, and how good he is in the corners and along the walls. But he just wasn’t quite himself after coming back from that [concussion] injury.

“As Don [Sweeney] mentioned, we’re going to look at every UFA that we have, and RFA, and come to conclusions on whether or not it makes sense for us to move forward with those players.”

While the Bruins may not have ruled out any of their looming free agents with July 1 still more than a month away, it seems like a long shot for Nash to come back to the Bruins based on his age, performance and cost to retain him. Certainly, the player said all the right things while packing up his stuff on breakup day with the team. Nash was an unassuming, pleasant presence following the trade.

Nothing has changed from the simple, basic truth that the Bruins could desperately use a player like Nash when he’s still at his best.

“It was disappointing with having a concussion, and having some effects during it, and only playing a certain amount of games. Then coming back for the playoffs,” said Nash. “But everything was positive. The organization was great. The guys were awesome...So, it was a great chapter here and hopefully, it can continue.

“I would love to [return], for sure. They’ve got a special group here and a lot of talent. It’s a great place to play.”

Clearly, Nash will be looking at a healthy pay cut from the $7.8 million cap hit and $8.2 million in actual salary he was paid in the 2017-18 season. He’s not the same dominant power forward-type he was in his prime years with the Columbus Blue Jackets and Rangers and is coming off 21 goals and 34 points along with a minus-12 in 60 games for the Blueshirts and Bruins. He still flashes the power puck possession, strong two-way game and occasional offense of his youth, but it sure looks like his ability to finish is fading.

If the Bruins could sign a player like Nash for a year or two in the $3-4 million per season range then it might be worth their while. He still appears good for at least 20 goals worth of big-bodied, power forward play. There may some level of interest in retaining Nash simply based on the large amount that Sweeney paid for the player at the deadline and the hope that he can still be what they envisioned him to be last spring.

But let’s be honest here.

What the Bruins really need is a young, better version of Nash on the upswing or at the very least is still in the prime of his career as they look for offensive impact on their second line. There are free-agent options such as James van Riemsdyk who will be much costlier while bringing a similar power forward skill set and there will undoubtedly be trade options such as the Gabriel Landeskog-types that the Bruins have flirted with in the past. Still, that will require the B’s surrendering more assets in trade after forking over their first-round pick, Spooner and a blue-chip prospect in Lindgren for what amounted to six goals and 11 points in 23 games from Nash.

That is not a lot of bang for the Black and Gold buck when it’s all settled.

If it were up to this humble hockey writer, it should be time to cut their losses on Nash while already holding an aging, overpriced power forward type in David Backes. Instead, the Bruins should focus on a younger, perhaps underrated commodity as Horton was when the Bruins traded for him as an underperforming Florida Panthers winger prior to the 2010-11 Cup-winning season.

The Bruins still need an explosive, big body as a goal-scoring bookend for Krejci on the second line, but there’s really no need to prolong the Rick Nash chapter given the underwhelming returns after his three-month stint with the team.

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