Bruins

Report: Blues already have victory celebration planned

Report: Blues already have victory celebration planned

The Boston Bruins are trying to keep their Stanley Cup hopes alive on Sunday in Game 6. They got some perfect bulletin board material to help out with that.

According to WPRI 12's Ruthie Polinsky, the St. Louis Blues may already have a victory celebration planned ahead of Sunday night's Game 6.

Apparently, it's not just the Blues team, either. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch also has ads prepared in the event that the Blues win tonight, and those were leaked as well in the subscriber-only version of the paper. 

While having confidence ahead of a game is usually a good thing, this is the type of news that could motivate the Bruins a bit extra. Hearing that the Blues are already prepared to celebrate a Cup win could fire them up and make them prove to the Blues that they won't be easy to take down.

This development has shades of the San Diego Chargers vs. New England Patriots game in 2007. During that postseason, the top-seeded Chargers took on the Patriots after discussing their potential parade route with the city of San Diego -- which got out ahead of the game. The Patriots ended up emerging with a 24-21 victory and rendered the Chargers' Super Bowl parade plans moot.

In fairness, the Chargers were much further away from a title than the Blues (they still had to win three games to get one) but the parallel is still there.

We'll see if the Bruins can spoil the Blues' plans in Game 6 and force a Wednesday night Game 7. If they can, it will mark the 12th time in franchise history that the team forces a Game 7 after trailing a series 3-2.

HAGGERTY: Five changes the B's must make to win Game 6>>>

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NHL Trade Deadline Report Cards: Which teams made the best moves?

NHL Trade Deadline Report Cards: Which teams made the best moves?

There are always winners and losers at the NHL trade deadline.

It doesn’t necessarily mean that a team is going to win a Stanley Cup, obviously, and some of the big winners at the deadline are lousy teams loading up on draft picks and assets for the future.

Still, it’s better to be moving and shaking at the trade deadline like a Carolina Hurricanes team that added Vincent Trocheck, Brady Skjei and Sami Vatanen than be a non-playoff team like the Wild that made one early Jason Zucker trade with Pittsburgh before closing their shutters for the week.

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The biggest winner of all might have been the New York Rangers in retaining Chris Kreider with a seven-year contract rather than making him the biggest trade target on the market.

But each team received a grade for what they did leading up to Monday’s NHL trade deadline and we didn’t mince any words.

Click here for the gallery.

Sorry, Bruins fans: bigger doesn't always mean better

Sorry, Bruins fans: bigger doesn't always mean better

Before we begin: No, I have never gotten my ass kicked.

Celtics fans have a reputation for being sheep, but man, when it comes to predictability there isn’t a group of dummies easier to impress than Bruins fans.

Still haven't gotten my ass kicked. Probably getting closer, though.

All you have to do to win over the Bruin brigade is get someone tall and/or "physical." No one will be more willing to overlook actual effectiveness than B's fans. This is especially the case when swapping out a “softer” (though perhaps better) player.

Reilly Smith for Jimmy Hayes? Downgrade, but fans were ecstatic.

Use Loui Eriksson’s money to sign David Backes? Downgrade, catastrophic move, but fans were ecstatic.

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We got another installment this week on deadline day when the Bruins traded Danton Heinen to the Ducks for Nick Ritchie in a swap of disappointing 24-year-old left wings.  

The national reaction was not kind to Ritchie. The NHL Network's panel was particularly brutal in calling him in an overweight underachiever. 

But around here? Hoo boy, what a coup! We saw 6-foot-2, 234 pounds, 10th overall pick and a bunch of penalty minutes and dusted off Milan Lucic's 2011 jersey. 

I'll admit that as soon as I heard the Bruins traded for Nick Ritchie, I was confused. I remembered his name from the draft, but was unaware that he'd become a good player. And if he was a good player, why was he being traded? He was surely still young, unless I'd misremembered. 

Nope. He was drafted in 2014, same as Heinen. Had 14 goals as a rookie, but hasn't come close to that since. He does have eight goals in 41 games this season, but his shooting percentage this season is an absolute outlier for his career (11.4; his career shooting percentage prior was 8.3). His 19 points are aided by a four-point showing in his final game with the Ducks, the only multi-point game he's had this season. 

He does have 78 penalty minutes, but none of them are from fights. Just misconducts and tripping players who skate past him because they're faster. 

He was fifth on the Ducks in hits per 60, if you want to bring that up, but you shouldn't.  

The same people who like the "hits" stat are often the ones who discredit possession metrics. But "hits" is unquestionably a possession metric. It means you don't have the puck. There is a reason that eight of the top 15 teams in the league in hits are non-playoff teams. They are chasing the play. 

(And by the way, the Bruins are eighth in the league in hits. They absolutely don't need to "hit" more.)

So that's Ritchie in a nutshell; a not-so-good player, but I'm rooting for him. If his acquisition were met with an "eh, maybe he'll uncover something in Boston he hasn't been able to find before," this pretentious-ass column wouldn't be required.

But it wasn't, and here we are. 

And I'll say that I was totally cool with moving Heinen. That guy's arrow was pointing in the wrong direction after an impressive rookie year and so-so sophomore campaign.

So I would have traded Heinen and some combination of picks and prospects for a sure thing. If Nick Ritchie and some cap savings (which you could get anyway by trading Heinen in the offseason) was the best I could do, I would have probably passed. Heinen is not much of a loss (not the way he's played this season, anyway), but Ritchie isn't much of a gain. 

Maybe Ritchie does find new life in Boston. Maybe he becomes a good third-liner. Hell, maybe he scores early in Game 7 of the Cup Final when the other team's goalie is an absolute mess. That was the real reason the Bruins didn't win last year, not because they weren't tough enough.