Celtics

Brad Stevens on Kemba Walker's knee injury: 'It's not a long-term thing'

Brad Stevens on Kemba Walker's knee injury: 'It's not a long-term thing'

Kemba Walker missed his second straight game Sunday with a knee injury, but Brad Stevens remains optimistic about the Boston Celtics guard's health going forward.

Before the C's road matchup against the Los Angeles Lakers, Stevens provided an encouraging update on Walker.

"I think he's getting better day by day and he did a lot of weight room and workout room yesterday," Stevens said. "I don't know how long it's going to be, but right now we're really focusing on him feeling great and strengthening [the knee].

"I think that it's not a long-term thing, but we need him to feel great. And, you know, the swelling was something that was new coming out of the break, and so we need to make sure he feels great as we hit the stretch run here."


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That's certainly good news for the C's as they'll need Walker down the stretch, especially come playoff time. But even without Walker, Boston has found ways to get the job done.

Without Walker on Friday vs. the Minnesota Timberwolves, four Celtics players scored 25-plus points en route to their 127-117 win. While they can't rely on that kind of production consistently without their All-Star guard, that's an impressive feat.

Walker is averaging 21.8 points, 5 assists, and 4.1 rebounds per game this season.

Don't miss NBC Sports Boston's coverage of Celtics-Trail Blazers, which begins Tuesday at 9 p.m. with Celtics Pregame Live followed by tip-off at 10 p.m. You can also stream on the MyTeams App.

Who should represent Celtics in NBA's H-O-R-S-E competition?

Who should represent Celtics in NBA's H-O-R-S-E competition?

The NBA is reportedly working on a televised H-O-R-S-E competition to keep us entertained while the season is suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The Celtics have a rather obvious choice for an entrant into that competition: Marcus Smart.

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The sixth-year guard has made trick shots his trademark, ending each pregame warmup by launching a deep baseline 3-pointer over his head until he makes one (and it usually doesn’t take many attempts). It's far from the only trick in Smart's toolbox — just check out the video above of Smart showing Brian Scalabrine some of his favorite shots from earlier this season.

Heck, Smart might be a favorite to win the event if he entered. Still, rather than make the obvious choice, we huddled up to pick some other possible Celtics entrants.

BLAKELY’S PICK: JAYSON TATUM

Jayson Tatum isn’t just Boston’s best scorer. But he’s also one of the team’s most creative ones as well. We know about the step-back jumpers and drives to the basket, but the trickster in Tatum comes out every now and then. 

And one of the few times we’ve seen this was during a stop in play during February’s All-Star Game when Tatum drained this over-the-back, off-the-top of the backboard shot that was nothing but net.

It’s safe to say that Tatum has that shot and a few more in his back of basketball tricks. 

FORSBERG’S PICK: TACKO FALL

The 7-foot-5 Fall would make it seem like he’s playing on a mini hoop with his height advantage.

He could wear down opponents with an array of baby hook shots and flat-footed dunks that would be more challenging for his regular-sized competition. Plus, everything is undeniably more entertaining when Fall is involved.

And anyone that thinks they can just sneak out to the 3-point line to beat him should think again:

BLAKELY’S PICK: JAVONTE GREEN

Javonte Green is the most athletic player on the Celtics roster.

So when it comes to trick shots, you can count on Green providing some above-the-rim exploits that will surely wow fans and — maybe most important — be extremely difficult for anyone competing against him to replicate.

FORSBERG’S PICK: ENES KANTER

Finally, all those hours that Kanter spent on TikTok would pay dividends as he enters the competition with an encyclopedic knowledge of circus shots.

Sure, he’s in trouble if Steph Curry-types start bombing away with simple 25-footers but the scales tip in favor of Kanter if the competition turns into a series of shots that must bounce off three walls or be punted through the cylinder.

In the ultimate quest to become a social media legend, Kanter dominates the competition, posts each of his successful makes on available platforms, and rakes in the followers.

Click here to listen and subscribe to The Enes Kanter Show Podcast — or watch it on YouTube.

Jayson Tatum, Bradley Beal team up for generous act amid coronavirus pandemic

Jayson Tatum, Bradley Beal team up for generous act amid coronavirus pandemic

Jayson Tatum is finding a way to make an impact with his day job on hold.

The Boston Celtics forward has partnered with Washington Wizards star Bradley Beal in pledging to donate a total of $500,000 to Boston- and St. Louis-area food banks.

Tatum made the announcement Monday on Instagram, revealing an initiative with Feeding America and Lineage Logistics called "Share a Meal."

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As this virus continues to spread, the future has never felt so unpredictable.  And while I sincerely pray that everyone is staying safe, healthy and social distancing, the reality is this virus has negatively impacted our families, loved ones and communities in so many ways.  Because of the hardships created through this national health crisis and in an effort to help those in need in the Boston and St. Louis area, I am, through The Jayson Tatum Foundation, partnering with @feedingamerica and @lineagelogistics on their “Share A Meal” campaign.  Together, @lineagelogistics and The Jayson Tatum Foundation are pledging to match $250,000 in the Boston area and, with my good friend and fellow basketball player Bradley Beal, $250,000 in the St. Louis area, to help provide meals through @feedingamerica, @stlfoodbank and @gr8bosfoodbank.  This campaign will help some of the hardest hit communities in Boston and in Brad and my hometown of St. Louis, receive meals.  If you are able to help, I am asking my family, friends,  fans and partners to follow the link in my bio to help make a difference in our communities during a very difficult time. I would especially like to thank all the frontline workers and volunteers who are working around the clock to keep all of us safe and healthy. Together…. we will make a difference. #NBATogether #ActsOfCaring

A post shared by Jayson Tatum🙏🏀 (@jaytatum0) on

Tatum and Beal, who both grew up in the St. Louis area, each pledged to match $250,000 in donations to the Greater Boston Food Bank and the St. Louis Area Food Bank as the coronavirus pandemic threatens food security in both cities.

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"This campaign will help some of the hardest hit communities in Boston and in Brad and my hometown of St. Louis, receive meals," Tatum wrote, asking those who are able to donate to either food bank.

Boston had 1,877 confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of Sunday, more than several U.S. states. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh issued new measures Sunday encouraging all residents to wear a face covering while leaving their homes and instituting a recommended curfew of 9 p.m.

Tatum and Beal's donations are generous gestures as both cities attempt to deal with a virus that already has disrupted many lives.

Tatum had been enjoying a breakout season for the Celtics before the NBA was suspended on March 11, but it sounds like the 22-year-old has his priorities in order with basketball on pause.

UPDATE (1:30 p.m. ET): Tatum was asked about his pledge Monday during a conference call with reporters. Here's what he had to say:

"Just trying to find a way that I could be of some assistance during this time. Always trying to find a way to give back, especially back in St. Louis and, Brad [Beal] is from St. Louis as well, so he teamed up with me to donate to help the people back home in St. Louis, and then to help the city of Boston. That’s how that came about."