Celtics

Celtics

Jaylen Brown believes the NBA can go further in its plan to give players a voice in Orlando.

The NBA and the NBA Players Association reportedly agreed to a list of messages promoting social justice that players can wear on the back of their jerseys during the restarted 2019-20 season.

While Brown is appreciative of the league taking that step, the Boston Celtics wing is less pleased about choosing a message from a list he believes is "limiting."

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"I would like to see -- because I think it can still happen -- more options available to put on the back of our jerseys," Brown said Monday in a video conference with reporters. "We understand anything vulgar our league doesn't necessarily represent, but for histories and causes such as now, I think that that list is an example of a form of limitation. I think we should be able to express our struggle just a little bit more.

" ... I was very disappointed in the list that was agreed to. I think things were tried and attempts were made to add to that list, but the NBA agreed that that list was satisfactory. Hopefully we can get some more names on that list."

The list reportedly has 29 messages total, including slogans such as, "Black Lives Matter," "Justice Now" and "I Can't Breathe."

But Brown, who has spoken out against racial inequality in America and led a protest in Atlanta last month following the death of George Floyd, has some additional messages in mind.

 

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"Maybe 'Break the Cycle,' 'Results' -- that's what everybody is really playing for -- 'Inequality by Design,' " Brown said, "things like that I think may have a deeper impact than some of the things that were given to us. I think it was a little bit limiting."

The 23-year-old admitted he and his Celtics teammates were hesitant to join the NBA restart due to concerns about the coronavirus and their calls for racial justice being lost. Yet Brown still believes the NBA bubble can provide a platform for him and other NBA players to get their messages across.

"We have to go down there and make sure that people don’t forget about George Floyd or Breonna Taylor or Philando Castile or Ahmaud Arbery or Trayvon Martin, which was in the Orlando area," Brown said. "And the list goes on."