Celtics

Celtics' Kyrie Irving apologizes for handling of media

Celtics' Kyrie Irving apologizes for handling of media

As the Celtics' fortune on the court improves, so does the team's attitude off of it.

Boston's rough patch prior to its current three-game win streak was highlighted by Kyrie Irving's distaste for the media. Irving was bothered by the media's coverage of his impending free agency, and called the media "outrageous" in a separate rant.

But following the C's victory over the Lakers on Saturday night, Irving apologized for the way he has handled the press throughout the season. 

“The way I’ve handled things, it hasn’t been perfect,” Irving told Yahoo Sports. “I’ve made a lot of mistakes that I take full responsibility for. I apologize. I haven’t done it perfectly. I haven’t said the right things all the time. I don’t want to sit on a place like I’m on a pedestal from anybody. I’m a normal human being that makes mistakes. For me, I think because of how fixated I was on trying to prove other people wrong, I got into a lot of habits that were bad, like reading stuff and reacting emotionally. That’s just not who I am.”

Irving acknowledged the need to set an example for his young teammates and peers around the NBA.

“Being one of the top guys in the league, this all comes with it,” Irving said.  “It’s a responsibility that I have to make sure that I know who I’m doing this for and know why I’m doing this. It’s for the players that are coming behind me who will be in this league and setting an example for them on how to handle things and how to evolve within your career.”

“I’m still learning, bro. I come from a suburb of New Jersey. I’m not used to all this [attention]," he added.

Irving was on the receiving end of more criticism when he told reporters he "didn't really come into this game to be a celebrity." That's because last summer, Irving put himself in front of plenty of cameras to shoot his "Uncle Drew" movie.

“My [Uncle Drew] character, I never took any acting classes. I didn’t put any extra work into it. It was just something I was able to do and it became this,” Irving said. “Look, I respect the ones that came before me, but they didn’t endure social media, the 24/7 news cycle. [NBA commissioner] Adam Silver was right; it really affects people in different ways. These are just different times. People are dealing with anxiety, depression and other disorders that affects their well-being. Some people can’t handle all of this, and we need to be mindful of that."

While his leadership has been in question over the last month or so, Irving still hopes to set an example for his teammates and makes it clear he accepts the responsibility that comes along with doing so. He says abandoning social media was the first step in that process, and pledges that his outbursts with the media won't continue.

“I just want to make sure this locker room understands who I am and what I represent,” said Irving. “I’m trying to make sure that they set a great example for young players that are coming after them as well. Like I said, I haven’t said the right things and done all the right things, and I don’t ever want to compare myself to perfection. But I can tell that I’m definitely learning from the older players, the players that are my age and the younger players on how to deal with the evolution of just media. It’s a platform now, it’s an entire industry that bothers a lot of people, entertainers, athletes. Being at the click of a button and someone commenting on your life all the time and you’re seeing it. It doesn’t make you feel good when you’re feeding yourself that.

“And I had to get off of Instagram, I had to get off of Facebook, I had to get off of Twitter," he continued. "I had to get off of those things to disconnect myself to focus on me, rather than getting information and validation from everyone else. So, once that started to progress, then I had a lot to fight back about. I was just sick of it after a while. I’m a human being who happens to be a hooper. This is the responsibility that I have. I’m done complaining about it. I have feelings about it, but I’m not going keep badgering the media, keep badgering other people, keep badgering this or that. It’s about moving forward and keeping my sanctuary as safe as possible. As long as I go out there and handle my business, I don’t have anything else to worry about. As long as I go out there and do my thing and make sure my teammates are playing well and their spirits are right, I’m doing my job.”

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A tall order for Celtics' Tacko Fall to prove he has more to offer than incredible height

A tall order for Celtics' Tacko Fall to prove he has more to offer than incredible height

FRANKLIN, Mass. -- Tacko Fall has heard the question time and time again. 

“How tall are you?”

“Five-11,” quipped Fall who has learned to have some fun with the all-too-common question that you kind of expect to be asked of someone like himself who stands well north of 7-feet tall. 

It’s easy to lock in on his 7-foot-7 frame and not think about him beyond that. 

But there’s so much more to Fall, a rookie signed to an Exhibit 10 contract earlier this summer by the Celtics. 

His Exhibit 10 contract guarantees he’ll get a small signing bonus and an invitation to training camp. 

Beyond that, the perks aren’t great. 

And yet despite an uncertain future with the Celtics, you would think he was bound for the Hall of Fame with the amount of attention he has received seemingly wherever he goes in New England. 

“Sometimes I feel like my height … obviously I am very tall,” Fall told NBC Sports Boston. “That’s gonna stick out. But a lot of times I don’t want to feel like a freak show. I feel I’m a lot more than that, I’ve shown I’m a lot more than that. Things like this, I try to show the type of person I am and keep building from there.”

The “this” Fall was referring to was the Home Makeover program sponsored by Arbella Insurance which brought him to Franklin, Mass. to participate in some basketball drills in addition to seeing the Celtics-themed room renovation. 

Being 7-7, Fall has to be careful of how he navigates his way in and out of houses.

But it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Fall understands angles so well considering his academic background. 

A native of Senegal, Fall learned at an early age how to manage both academics and athletics. 

“When I was a kid, my mom was really strict about school,” Fall said. “Growing up, that was my mentality. I approach everything the same way, whether it’s in the classroom or on the court. I try to be the best at everything I do.”

Fall is indeed a late bloomer when it comes to basketball, but has proven himself both on and off the court as being able to pick up things quickly. 

It took him about eight months to become fluent in English once he arrived in the United States. 

And his SAT scores in high school ranked among the 95th percentile, with him taking advanced math and science courses soon followed by him majoring in Computer Science at the University of Central Florida.

Now, Fall finds himself being more of a student of the game, looking to continue his unexpected basketball ascension while making the most of every opportunity that comes his way. 

Following his senior year at UCF, Fall did not get an invite to the NBA Combine. 

However, he was among the 80 players invited to the NBA G-League Elite camp, with the top players in that camp getting an invite to the NBA Pre-Draft combine. 

Fall earned a spot at the NBA combine, and made his presence felt by setting several records including tallest height in shoes (7-7), wingspan (8-2 ¼) and standing reach (10-2 ½) which allows him to dunk without jumping. 

But Fall knows regardless of the stats or the adulation he has received, he comes into training camp next month with no guarantees other than the opportunity to play his way into a guaranteed roster spot with the Celtics. 

“I know what I am fighting for,” Fall said. “That hasn’t changed since I got here. I know what I am capable of and where I want to be and where I need to be. I’m gonna fight every day to be in that position and stay there. I love the game of basketball and there’s no better place to do it than the NBA. Night-in, night out, play against the best players in the world. For me, that’s fun.”

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Obamas buying $14.85M Martha's Vineyard estate from Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck

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File photo

Obamas buying $14.85M Martha's Vineyard estate from Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck

Boston Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck is selling his beautiful Martha Vineyard estate to Barack and Michelle Obama, according to the Daily Mail.

The estate reportedly is on the market for $14.85 million and features a 7,000 sqft house with seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms.

Take a look at the stunning home below (photos courtesy of LandVest via coldwellbankerhomes.com):

The estate features a pool (above), a chef's kitchen, and an outdoor fireplace.

Grousbeck's former home has 29 acres of beachfront property near the edge of Edgartown Great Pond.

The mansion originally was listed for $22.5 million in August 2015.

With two fireplaces, a family kitchen and chef's kitchen, and a huge master bedroom with a sundeck, it's no wonder why the Obamas were attracted by the opportunity to purchase Grousbeck's estate.

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