Celtics

Patrick Beverley apparently took insult to this Marcus Smart comparison

Patrick Beverley apparently took insult to this Marcus Smart comparison

Any objective outsider would notice Patrick Beverley and Marcus Smart play with a similar fire and intensity.

But Beverley isn't an objective outsider.

So, when the Los Angeles Clippers' resident agitator was asked after Wednesday night's win over the Boston Celtics what it was like facing Smart -- one of the few NBA players who can match his intensity -- Beverley bristled.

Here's the exchange, via Tomer Azarly of ClutchPoints:

Beverley conveyed very clearly via his silence and icy stare that he believes no one can match his intensity on the court -- not even Smart, who's billed as one of the toughest players in the league.

Smart probably would have something to say about this exchange if he saw it. But after Beverley helped the Clippers seal a 107-104 victory with a clutch 3-pointer in overtime, Smart was complimentary of his combatant.

"Pat Bev is a gamer,” Marcus Smart told reporters after the game, via MassLive.com. “He got himself going. He got a couple easy buckets. He got a couple steals. ... He changed the game, that’s what he does."

While hustle and intensity aren't quantifiable stats, Smart is contributing more than Beverley on the stat sheet, averaging 12.1 points, 5.1 assists and 1.3 steals per game compared to Beverley's 7.7 points, 3.0 assists and 1.7 steals per game.

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Celtics guard Marcus Smart confirms he's cleared of coronavirus

Celtics guard Marcus Smart confirms he's cleared of coronavirus

The Boston Celtics faithful got some great news on Sunday night. Marcus Smart has officially been cleared of coronavirus as of Friday.

Smart took to Twitter on Sunday night to proclaim that he had been "corona free" for two days. Here's a look at his message to fans.

That's excellent news that Smart is healthy. Brad Stevens had confirmed that Smart had been "feeling good" in a recent interview, and it appears that the scrappy guard is now out of the woods.

Smart had been asymptomatic at the time of his test. But he was tested out of an abundance of caution given that the Celtics had squared off against the Utah Jazz not long before Rudy Gobert tested positive for the disease.

After his diagnosis, Smart appeared on CNN to offer his perspective on the pandemic. He said that he was taking the quarantine "very, very seriously" even before his test had come back positive.

With Smart cleared, that means that all Celtics players and staffers that were tested have been cleared of COVID-19.

Tacko Fall discusses Africa-to-America basketball pipeline on 60 Minutes

Tacko Fall discusses Africa-to-America basketball pipeline on 60 Minutes

When Tacko Fall was 16, he left Senegal for the first time. The big man came to the United States on a special visa to attend high school and develop as a basketball player.

There was only one problem. Fall wasn't very familiar with the game of basketball. And as he described in an interview with 60 Minutes correspondent Jon Wertheim, that was part of his tough adjustment to life in the USA.

"I was a big kid. I was huge. I was 7' 2". But I didn't know what I was doing on the basketball court. I had no idea," Fall said, as transcribed by CBS News' Keith Zubrow. "I didn't even know if I belonged in there. Some [of] it was a tough time getting adjusted to that. Just playing every day, working out, practicing, having the regimen. And it was also tough mentally, not having my mom, not having my family around."

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Though Fall had his share of issues at first, including moving to several different states before ultimately landing at Liberty Christian Prep, nearby Orlando, Fla., he ultimately figured everything out. He went to play for the UCF Golden Knights where he was one of their team's best players and the NCAA's best shot blockers. 

While Fall went undrafted after a four-year career at UCF, he caught on with the Boston Celtics during the Las Vegas Summer League. He became an instant fan-favorite and found a perfect role with the squad as a two-way player. And before the NBA shut down, he spent most of his time with the Maine Red Claws continuing to develop his game while averaging 12.9 points, 11.1 rebounds, and 2.9 blocks and making better than 70 percent of his shots.

But Fall knows that there are some that aren't so lucky. And he's hoping that the NBA getting involved with the program will improve conditions for all involved.

"[There's] been many times where I feel like some people have been taken advantage of," Fall said. "They bring them here, then that's it. Then they're just left for their own. And if things don't work out, then they are pretty much screwed. It's getting better. I feel like now that they know what's going on, people are being more careful… especially now with the NBA being involved. And it's only gonna keep getting better."

Hopefully, it does continue to get better as Fall says. And maybe he can work with the NBA to help shape a program that helps all parties involved attain a desirable outcome.