Celtics

Why Joel Embiid is frustrated with Sixers role post-Jimmy Butler trade

Why Joel Embiid is frustrated with Sixers role post-Jimmy Butler trade

As the Boston Celtics will tell you, adding an All-Star to your lineup comes with growing pains.

And Joel Embiid is feeling the brunt of them in Philadelphia, it seems.

The 76ers center admitted Friday in no uncertain terms he's not happy with how head coach Brett Brown has used him since Philly traded for swingman Jimmy Butler.

"I haven’t been myself lately,” Embiid said, via Philly.com's Keith Pompey. “I think it’s mainly because of the way I’ve been used, which is I’m being used as a spacer, I guess, a stretch five, which I’m only shooting (29) percent (from 3-point range)."

Embiid didn't play Friday night in the Sixers' win over the Detroit Pistons after averaging just 13.7 points over his previous three contests. He shot just 33.3 percent from the floor (14-for-42) while going 1-for-9 from beyond the arc.

Philly's new offensive sets with Butler apparently station Embiid on the perimeter more often than he'd like, however.

"It seems like the past couple games, like with the way I play, our setup, (Brown) always has me starting on the perimeter … and it just really frustrates me. My body feels great, and it’s just I haven’t been playing well.”

Brown, meanwhile, said he "(didn't) see the connection of Jimmy having much to do with spacing," noting defenses often crowd Embiid when he gets the ball in the paint.

Embiid's frustrations aren't really harming the Sixers, who have won nine of their last 11 games. But just as Boston needed to find its offensive identity after Gordon Hayward's return, Philly may have to find a better way to utilize Embiid with Butler in the mix.

The Celtics, who have won four straight and trail the Sixers by just 2 1/2 games for the Eastern Conference's No. 3 seed, will be paying close attention.

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NBC SPORTS BOSTON SCHEDULE

NBC Sports Boston Breakfast Podcast: Celtics come off the break with tough loss to Bucks

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NBC Sports Boston Breakfast Podcast: Celtics come off the break with tough loss to Bucks

1:18 - Chris Forsberg joins Michael Holley and DJ Bean to break down the Celtics 98-97 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks in their first game back from the All-Star Break.

5:35 - We hear from Alex Cora down in Fort Myers on the state of Dustin Pedroia returning to the field and Tom Giles is joined by Lou Merloni to discuss how the veteran second baseman has looked in the first week of camp.

8:41 -Tommy Heinsohn chimes in on the drama and problems affecting the Celtics from Kyrie’s blowup about the media on Thursday night to his comments about the media tearing locker rooms apart.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Celtics easily on your device.

NBA official explains late game shot clock violation in Celtics-Bucks game

NBA official explains late game shot clock violation in Celtics-Bucks game

MILWAUKEE -- The good news is folks won’t have to wait until the league’s two-minute report to learn why the officials ruled a shot-clock violation against Milwaukee on a potential tipped-in shot attempt in the closing seconds. 

With the Bucks ahead 98-97 and in possession of the ball, there was a jumpball called between Giannis Antetokounmpo and Marcus Smart with 0.2 seconds on the shot clock. 

Antetokounmpo tipped the ball to Brook Lopez, who immediately tapped it towards the rim with the goal being to kill as much of the 3.7 seconds remaining off the clock as possible.

But after the officials huddled together, they ruled that it was a shot-clock violation.

☘️ BUCKS 98, CELTICS 97

After the game, pool reporter Eric Nehm of The Athletic spoke with NBA crew chief Mike Callahan about the call. 

Here is their exchange:

Q: Please explain why there was a shot clock violation off the jump ball with 3.7 seconds remaining (in the game)?

Callahan: “With .2 seconds, the 24-second clock didn’t start until (Brook) Lopez possessed the ball. When he possesses the ball, you cannot have a legal shot attempt with .2 on the shot clock.”

Q: Does the clock start on that play when Giannis (Antetokounmpo) tips the ball or when Brook Lopez catches it?

Callahan: “The 24-second clock starts when Lopez has possession of the ball on his shot attempt.”

Q: How much time is needed to execute a tip without it being a violation?

Callahan: “A legal tip play can occur with .1 or .2 tenths of a second.”

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