Patriots

NFL invokes Spygate in explanation of Patriots punishment

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NFL invokes Spygate in explanation of Patriots punishment

When the NFL's executive vice president of football operations Troy Vincent explained his reasoning for the Patriots punishment he determined, he brought up the videotaping scandal known widely as Spygate, indicating that the punishment was not simply limited to any inappropriate action when it came to how the team prepared its game footballs. 

Here is the published text of Vincent's letter to the Patriots, in which Vincent says that the findings in the Spygate case qualify, under the Integrity of the Game Policy, as a "prior violation of competitive rules."

"On May 6th, independent investigator Ted Wells issued his report regarding the footballs used by the Patriots in this year’s AFC Championship Game. That report established that the footballs used by the Patriots were inflated at a level that did not satisfy the standard set forth in the NFL’s Official Playing Rules and that the condition of the footballs was the result of deliberate actions by employees of the Patriots. The activities of the Patriots’ employees were thoroughly documented in the report, including through a series of text messages and telephone communications, as well as evidence of a breach in pre-game protocol. In addition, the conclusions were supported by extensive scientific analysis, as detailed in the report.

"Based on the extensive record developed in the investigation and detailed in the Wells report, and after full consideration of this matter by the Commissioner and the Football Operations department, we have determined that the Patriots have violated the NFL's Policy on Integrity of the Game and Enforcement of Competitive Rules, as well as the Official Playing Rules and the established guidelines for the preparation of game footballs set forth in the NFL’s Game Operations Policy Manual for Member Clubs. In making this determination, we have accepted the findings contained in the comprehensive report independently prepared by Mr. Wells and his colleagues.

"In determining that a violation occurred, we applied the standard of proof stated in the Integrity of the Game Policy: namely, preponderance of the evidence, meaning that ‘as a whole, the fact sought to be proved is more probable than not.’ This is a well-recognized legal standard, which is applied in courts and workplaces every day throughout the country. The evidence gathered during the investigation and reviewed in the report more than satisfy this standard and demonstrate an ongoing plan by at least certain Patriots’ employees to deflate footballs, to do so in a secretive manner after the game officials have certified the footballs as suitable for play, and to hide these activities even from their own supervisors.

"As you know, we regard violations of competitive rules as significant and deserving of a strong sanction, both to punish the actual violation and to deter misconduct in the future. In this case, the footballs were intentionally deflated in an effort to provide a competitive advantage to Tom Brady after having been certified by the game officials as being in compliance with the playing rules. While we cannot be certain when the activity began, the evidence suggests that January 18th was not the first and only occasion when this occurred, particularly in light of the evidence referring to deflation of footballs going back to before the beginning of the 2014 season.

"It is impossible to determine whether this activity had an effect on the outcome of games or what that effect was. There seems little question that the outcome of the AFC Championship Game was not affected. But this has never been a significant factor in assessing discipline. There are many factors which affect the outcome of a game. It is an inherently speculative exercise to try to assign specific weight to any one factor. The key consideration in any case like this is that the playing rules exist for a reason, and all clubs are entitled to expect that the playing rules will be followed by participating teams. Violations that diminish the league's reputation for integrity and fair play cannot be excused simply because the precise impact on the final score cannot be determined.

"Here, there are several factors that merit strong consideration in assessing discipline. The first is the club’s prior record. In 2007 the club and several individuals were sanctioned for videotaping signals of opposing defensive coaches in violation of the Constitution and Bylaws. Under the Integrity of the Game Policy, this prior violation of competitive rules was properly considered in determining the discipline in this case.

"Another important consideration identified in the Policy is ‘the extent to which the club and relevant individuals cooperated with the investigation.’ The Wells report identifies two significant failures in this respect. The first involves the refusal by the club’s attorneys to make Mr. McNally available for an additional interview, despite numerous requests by Mr. Wells and a cautionary note in writing of the club’s obligation to cooperate in the investigation. The second was the failure of Tom Brady to produce any electronic evidence (emails, texts, etc.), despite being offered extraordinary safeguards by the investigators to protect unrelated personal information. Although we do not hold the club directly responsible for Mr. Brady’s refusal to cooperate, it remains significant that the quarterback of the team failed to cooperate fully with the investigation.

"Finally, it is significant that key witnesses – Mr. Brady, Mr. Jastremski, and Mr. McNally - were not fully candid during the investigation.

"In accepting the findings of the report, we note that the report identified no evidence of wrongdoing or knowledge of wrongdoing on the part of any member of the coaching staff, including Head Coach Bill Belichick, or by any Patriots’ staff member other than Mr. Jastremski and Mr. McNally, including head equipment manager Dave Schoenfeld. Similarly, the Wells report is clear that Patriots ownership and executives did not participate in any way in the misconduct, or have knowledge of the misconduct.

"Nonetheless, it remains a fundamental principle that the club is responsible for the actions of club employees. This principle has been applied to many prior cases. Thus, while no discipline should or will be imposed personally on any owner or executive at the Patriots, discipline is appropriately imposed on the club."

Tom Brady had a great retort for 'Madden NFL 20' over high-five snub

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USA TODAY Sports

Tom Brady had a great retort for 'Madden NFL 20' over high-five snub

Tom Brady's social media game hasn't lost a step this offseason.

EA Sports released a teaser video for its "Madden NFL 20" video game that incredibly featured footage of the New England Patriots quarterback getting snubbed on a high-five attempt.

That's a pretty savage move ... and one that didn't go unnoticed by Brady, who fired back the perfect retort on his Instagram story.

Well played, Tom.

The "Madden Curse" used to be a real thing, as players like Rob Gronkowski and Peyton Hillis either got hurt or fell into obscurity after gracing the "Madden" cover. (Yes, Peyton Hillis was on a "Madden" cover.)

But Brady smashed the curse in 2017, winning NFL MVP honors after landing on the "Madden NFL 18" cover.

The 41-year-old QB also left a zinger for EA Sports in the Instagram comment section, where teammate Julian Edelman came to his defense, as well.

This is the second day in a row Brady has fired off a Madden-related barb on social media, so if you're going to take a shot at the GOAT, be prepared for battle.

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Report: 40% chance of Rob Gronkowski 'unretirement'

Report: 40% chance of Rob Gronkowski 'unretirement'

Rob Gronkowski and Brett Favre don't have much in common...yet. 

Pro Football Talk reporter Mike Florio compared the two on Tuesday after a source close to the retired tight end told Florio there's a 40% chance of Gronkowski coming back in 2019. Florio noted that a possible appeal from Tom Brady and an itch to get back to playing football could eventually sway Gronkowski out of retirement. Florio also speculates that Gronkowski may come back for the "good stuff," the end of the season and playoffs.

"For now, Gronk isn’t thinking about football," Florio writes. "He’s enjoying his life, he doesn’t need the money, and he’s having a blast. The question becomes whether Gronkowski misses his teammates and/or the games after August becomes September. While he won’t miss dealing with training camp and the preseason, he could miss the game once they start playing games that count."

Since retiring from the NFL, Gronkowski has posted cryptic messages about coming back on social media, chatted up Drew Brees at the ESPYs about apparently coming back, and caught passes from Tom Brady at UCLA, fueling comeback speculation. 

Separately, sources have told Florio that New England head coach Bill Belichick has been supportive of Gronkowski, and has developed a softer, more "player-friendly" approach as his Super Bowl rings pile up. 

Still, until Gronkowski decides definitively one way or another, the Brett Favre-esque retire-unretire speculation will continue. 

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