Patriots

Ex-NFL star boldly asserts NFL teams are no longer 'afraid' to play Patriots

Ex-NFL star boldly asserts NFL teams are no longer 'afraid' to play Patriots

The New England Patriots are 9-1 and lead the AFC standings entering Week 12 of the 2019 NFL season, but that's not enough for one former star player to believe teams still fear playing the defending Super Bowl champions.

Greg Jennings, who was once a very productive player and won a Super Bowl with the Green Bay Packers, is currently an NFL analyst for FOX Sports. He went on FS1's morning show "First Things First" on Tuesday and boldly claimed teams are now unafraid of playing the Patriots.

“You’ve got to think about just the history of the New England and what goes before them, what precedes them? Their reputation has always preceded them. And teams are just not afraid to play the New England Patriots. They’re just not. There’s always been this little angst with teams going into Foxboro in January because of who? Tom Brady, and what he provides in the playoffs. Now, I get it, he’s a different player typically in the playoffs, and you don’t have to be so great, but you just can’t make mistakes, and he typically doesn't do that. But when I look at these teams and what they’ve always been afraid of or leery of is Tom Brady beating them. And I just don’t see that being the case — No. 1 because his ability has started to decline, and then you already don’t have the personnel that’s going to elevate and supplement what he’s now lacking, which they did last year in Sony Michel.”

Jennings fails to remember everyone made these points last season when the Los Angeles Chargers went into Gillette Stadium for the AFC Divisional Round. The Patriots had struggled to an 11-5 record and no team was going to fear playing them in the playoffs. The Chargers were 12-4 and, according to the "experts", it was finally going to be the year Phillip Rivers beat Brady in the postseason. What happened? The Patriots demolished the Chargers 41-28 (the halftime score was 35-7 Pats).

The very next week, the same criticisms bubbled back up to the surface. The Patriots allegedly had no chance to beat MVP quarterback Patrick Mahomes and the Kansas City Chiefs on the road in the AFC Championship Game. But the Patriots did win, and Brady was almost flawless when it mattered most late in the fourth quarter and overtime. Brady won his record-breaking sixth Super Bowl title two weeks later.

The playoffs are a different beast. The pressure and expectations are increased dramatically. It's hard for a lot of players to overcome it, especially when they have little experience playing in January. Brady is arguably the best playoff performer of all-time, regardless of sport. And you can bet teams really don't want to go to Foxboro in January when it's freezing cold and the best coach and quarterback in league history are on the home sideline.

In the meantime, would anyone be surprised if the above clip is played inside Gillette Stadium this week? Maybe fans should be thanking Jennings, because this is prime bulletin board material for a team that thrives off that kind of stuff.

WATCH: Pats go crazy when Belichick declares "Victory Monday">>>

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For Josh McDaniels, adapting offense means tapping into Cam Newton's superpower

For Josh McDaniels, adapting offense means tapping into Cam Newton's superpower

Josh McDaniels wouldn’t trade his time with Tom Brady for anything.

But the Patriots offensive coordinator did point out Friday that those times Brady wasn’t at his disposal are very valuable right now as the Patriots offense does its post-Brady pivot.

“I’m thankful for the experiences that I’ve had when I didn’t have Tom,” McDaniels said on a video conference call. “Believe me, no one was happier to have him out there when he was out there for all the years I was fortunate to coach him.

"But I would say I did have some experience with the Matt Cassel year (in 2008), which I learned a lot about how to tailor something to somebody else’s strengths, we had to play that four-game stretch (in 2016) with Jacoby (Brissett) and Jimmy (Garoppolo), I thought that was helpful. And I was away for three years. So trying to really adapt … it’s not changing your system, it’s adapting your system to the talents and strengths of your players.”

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How will the Patriots offense change now that Brady’s gone has been a dominant topic of discussion this offseason. The six-time Super Bowl winners' strengths are well-documented and hard to replicate – absurd accuracy, poise, pocket-presence and the ability to decipher and manipulate defenses at will. Part of the reason they’re hard to replicate is that it took him a dozen years of monkish devotion to get where he was. Nobody’s got time for that.

So, after a couple of decades building a tower out of wooden blocks, the blocks are knocked down and scattered. And McDaniels starts building again. Same blocks. Different-looking structure.  

“(We need to) adapt (the offense) to the players that we have,” said McDaniels. “So, again, you just have to keep telling yourself, ‘Do I really want us to be good at this? Or are we good at this?’ There’s a fine line between really pushing hard to keep working at something that you’re just not showing much progress in vs. ‘Hey, you know what, we’re a lot better at A, B and C then we are D, E and F, why don’t we just do more A, B and C?” I think as a staff we’ve really had a lot of conversations about those kinds of things.”

McDaniels has discussed in past seasons how developing an offense is a trial-and-error process. The difference this year is there is no chance for the “trial” portion. No joint practices. No preseason games. Obviously, no OTAs or minicamps.

“We can’t make any declarations about what we’re good at yet because we haven’t practiced,” McDaniels acknowledged. “I think everybody’s chomping at the bit, eager to get out there and start to make a few decisions about some things that we want to try to get good at, and if we’re just not making a lot of progress then we just have to shift gears and go in a different direction.

“But I’m going to lean on my experience and then I’m going to lean on the staff, coach Belichick, just to, (say), ‘Let’s be real with ourselves. Yeah, we used to be good at that. We’re not doing so hot at it so let’s just scrap it for now and move in a different direction.”

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Obviously, a direction they’ll move in will most likely be powered by the mobility of whoever the starting quarterback is, Jarrett Stidham or Cam Newton.

McDaniels pointed out that a player with the size, power and mobility of Newton does change things.

“It’s certainly not something I’m accustomed to using a great deal but you use whatever the strengths of your players that are on the field allow you to use, to try to move the ball and score points,” he said. “So whatever that means relative to mobility at the QB position, size and power, quickness, length, height with receivers … you go through the same thing many different times.”

Newton, said McDaniels, is the same as any other player who brings a unique talent.  

“I remember when you get a new receiver group … our receivers have changed quite a bit in terms of some of them were bigger … Randy Moss was a bigger guy and then we’ve had some smaller guys like Wes Welker and Danny Amendola, and then you have tight ends that are more fast straight-line players and then you have guys like Gronk and those kinds of players,” he pointed out.

“Regardless of what the position is, I think you try to use their strengths to allow them to make good plays and if that’s something we can figure out how to do well and get comfortable doing and feel like we can move the ball and be productive then we’re going to work as a staff to figure out how that works best, and try to utilize it if we can.”

In other words, when you have a player with a superpower - Moss' speed, Welker's quickness, Gronk's size, Brady's brain, Newton's power - , you tap into said superpower. ASAFP.

Cam Newton provides update after openly wondering how he'd 'mesh' with Bill Belichick

Cam Newton provides update after openly wondering how he'd 'mesh' with Bill Belichick

How well will Cam Newton and Bill Belichick work together, we've wonderedNewton asked himself the same question when he found out that the Patriots were interested in signing him earlier this offseason. 

He shared his thought process on YouTube during a roundtable discussion with Victor Cruz, Odell Beckham and Todd Gurley: "I said, 'Hold on. How, how is me and Belichick gonna mesh?' You know what I'm saying?"

Well . . . plenty of time has elapsed since then. Newton and his new Patriots teammates have been at Gillette Stadium this week going through what Belichick has compared to the NFL's typical "Phase 1," which usually takes place in the spring and consists of meetings as well as strength and conditioning workouts.

So how has it gone? How have Newton and his new head coach meshed?

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"Listen, listen," Newton said during a WebEx conference call with reporters Friday. "There's a lot of things that I say that there's a perception, but at the end of the day, it's football. I've loved it ever since I've been here. 

"I've been here, going on a week, now and you hear rumors about certain things, but once you finally get settled in on things like that, none of that really matters. It's just all about finding a way to prove your worth on the team."

Belichick has coached all types of personalities, and had success with all types, during his Patriots tenure. Tom Brady was different than Rob Gronkowski, who was different than Randy Moss, who was different than Corey Dillon, who was different than Richard Seymour, who was different than Willie McGinest, who was different than Tedy Bruschi, who was different than Matt Light. 

Newton is a unique personality with a unique skill set who may require a unique approach from the Patriots coaching staff when it comes to drawing out his best. And there may be some bumps in the road as the team finds the right path to maximizing Newton's stay in Foxboro. But for now, according to Newton, everything is going swimmingly. 

It helps that before Newton even set foot inside the team's facilities, they'd established a track record that has him ready to buy into Belichick's way of doing things. 

"I'm still constantly -- I don't want to say in disbelief, but it's just a surreal moment," Newton said. "Nobody really knows how excited I am just to be a part of this organization in (more) ways than one.

"Following up such a powerful dynasty that has so much prestige and lineage of success -- a lot of people would hide from the notion to do certain things, but for me, I think this opportunity is something that I wake up pinching myself each and every day."