Patriots

Patriots draft pick Chase Winovich mic'd up at Michigan is a sight to behold

Patriots draft pick Chase Winovich mic'd up at Michigan is a sight to behold

We'd like to direct your attention to a year-old documentary of the 2017 Michigan football team.

Why? Because it contains proof that Chase Winovich might have a couple screws loose.

The New England Patriots made Winovich the No. 77 overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft, and the 24-year-old has serious upside as an edge rusher in New England's 4-3 defense.

Speaking of edge ... Winovich plays with a certain, err, "spirit" that Amazon's "All or Nothing: The Michigan Wolverines" captured with some awesome mic'd up footage from the 2017 season.

(Thanks to NESN.com's Zack Cox for digging these up.)

That's Winovich screaming "Please block me!!!" before burning an offensive tackle for a sack and yelling in the poor guy's face, "I said, 'block me!' "

That's also Winovich relishing in the taste of his own blood and sharing a very aggressive take about in-game injuries.

Sounds like a guy who could get along well with Tom Brady, himself a fiery competitor and a former Wolverine.

Winovich backed up his trash talk with some eye-popping stats, too, posting a team-high 8.5 sacks and 19 tackles for loss during that 2017 en route to a First-Team All-Big Ten nod.

With Trey Flowers headed for greener pastures, the Patriots could use a high-motor guy on their defensive line, and it appears they've found a good one in Winovich.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Celtics easily on your device.

Report: 2020 NFL Draft will be conducted from homes, not team facilities

Report: 2020 NFL Draft will be conducted from homes, not team facilities

While the tradition of the NFL draft in late April apparently will not be stopped by the coronavirus, the traditional draft "war room" might be.

Download the MyTeams app for the latest Patriots news and analysis

NFL teams are preparing to conduct the April 23-25 draft with personnel at their homes and not at their team facilities, ESPN's Adam Schefter reported.  

Schefter and ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski also reported that President Trump had a conference call on Saturday with the commissioners of each of the major league sports and Trump said he believes the NFL season should start on time. The regular season is scheduled to begin Sept. 10, a Thursday night, when the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs host an opponent to be determined. 

Trump, who last week expressed the hope that mass gatherings could return by Easter Sunday before backtracking on the advice of medical experts and scientists and extending restrictions until April 30, also said he hopes to have fans back in stadiums and arenas by August and September. 

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell ordered team facilities closed more than a week ago.

Earlier, when the NFL announced that the draft would go on as scheduled, it was thought that the teams would work from their facilities - with only 10 people in a room, each six feet apart - to make the picks and contact players chosen via video conferencing. 

Listen and subscribe to Phil Perry's Next Pats Podcast here: 

It appears from Schefter's report that the video conferencing will be going on not only with picks but among individual team's general managers, scouts and coaches as they shelter in place like the rest of us while the coronavirus continues to wreak havoc on the world. 

It creates an unprecedented draft, likely devoid of a lot of the glitzy production values that the original idea of the draft in Las Vegas would've had, but still a far cry from when the teams' decision-makers met in a smoky New York hotel ballroom on a Tuesday in late April to do the picking. 

 

New York Post salutes Robert Kraft with 'Thank You, Pats' front page

New York Post salutes Robert Kraft with 'Thank You, Pats' front page

That whole Boston-New York rivalry thing gets put aside when it comes to public health and the crisis we all find ourselves in these days.

Download the MyTeams app for the latest Patriots news and analysis

There's no better example of that than the front page of the New York Post on Saturday morning:

Patriots owner Robert Kraft sent the team plane to China to purchase and bring back 1.7 million N95 protective masks needed to help combat the deadly coronavirus that has hit New York City particularly hard. The Kraft family donated 300,000 masks to New York-area hospitals and they arrived on Friday in a tractor-trailer emblazoned with the Patriots logo. 

In a city that, as Post columnist Mark Cannizzaro put it, has "been trained to disdain" everything about the Patriots and Boston teams, it should be a gesture that forever puts Kraft in the New York family: 

Today, however, everyone associated with New York — Jets fans or otherwise — should salute the 78-year-old Kraft, who delivered a deed so special in this frightening and uncertain time of the coronavirus crisis that it should never be forgotten.

Even Jets superfan "Fireman Ed" Anzalone told the Post he has to put the rivalry aside.

“I don’t like his team. They’ve been beating us up for quite some time. But Kraft is just a wonderful guy, so I’m not surprised by his actions.”