Red Sox

Blake Swihart thanks Red Sox fans before Diamondbacks debut in Instagram post

Blake Swihart thanks Red Sox fans before Diamondbacks debut in Instagram post

Blake Swihart is about to begin the next chapter in his career after getting traded to the Diamondbacks for minor league outfielder Marcus Wilson Friday.

Before his debut, the 27-year-old went on Instagram to thank the Red Sox and their fans. 

View this post on Instagram

Red Sox Nation - As today is the first day I will wear a jersey that doesn’t have Boston/Red Sox across my chest, I wanted to reach out and thank all of you personally. While today I turn the page on a new chapter, I leave the Red Sox organization with so many amazing friends, teammates, and of course you, the fans. You embraced me as part of “The Nation” as a 19 year-old boy from New Mexico and helped me grow into a man, and last year, into a champion! I take with me so many great memories and look forward to building many new ones as my journey continues in Arizona. Thanks for always being supportive and cheering for me and our teams. You will always hold a special place in my heart and a piece of me will always be part of Red Sox nation!

A post shared by Blake Swihart (@blakeswihart_1) on

Swihart played for the Red Sox in a reserve role since 2015 and posted a .255/.310/.385 slash line before he was designated for assignment Tuesday in order for the Red Sox to bring back Sandy Leon.

Swihart will look to revamp his career in Arizona, where the Diamondbacks plan on trying him out at many positions other than catcher

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Dana LeVangie on Chris Sale: 'At some point, you just say, '[Bleep] it. This is who I am.' '

Dana LeVangie on Chris Sale: 'At some point, you just say, '[Bleep] it. This is who I am.' '

BOSTON -- Chris Sale described the moment as "pissed off." Pitching coach Dana LeVangie used saltier language.

Whatever the level of profanity, both pitcher and coach expect to see a different Sale the next time he takes a mound, because all involved have seen enough.

"At some point," LeVangie noted, "you just say, '[Bleep] it, this is who I am."

On Wednesday, Sale extended one of the most shocking streaks in baseball by making his 12th consecutive regular-season start in Fenway Park without a win, joining a group that includes Frank Castillo, Pete Schourek, and Eduardo Rodriguez.

He allowed five runs vs. the White Sox and took a no-decision in the 8-7 loss. Chicago knocked him around for three runs in the first and two in the third before Sale got angry. From that point forward, he was a different pitcher.

Limiting the slider that the White Sox seemed to be sitting on, Sale reached back and found his vintage fastball, consistently blowing away the overmatched White Sox with heaters of 95-97 mph. He ended up going six innings and striking out 10 while his ERA climbed to 3.82, but over those final three innings, he basically said, "Bleep it. I'm Chris Sale."

"I got back to doing what makes me successful and just letting it eat," Sale said. "Once I got a little pissed off and started just getting after it, it changed a little bit, the dynamic of the game. A little bit of that and just trusting my stuff and just trying to fill the strike zone."

Sale threw 14 pitches of at least 96 mph, and all but two of them came in the final three innings. He had previously tried to place his slider with a needless level of precision, and it lacked its usual bite.

"That's usually one of my better pitches and especially for strikeouts, so it just got flat and I wasn't getting around it," Sale said. "Not getting it out in front, there's really no depth. It's more lateral than down.

"Like I said, later in the game it got a little bit better when I just started throwing it. I feel like I'm out there trying to shape pitches with how I'm throwing it instead of just letting the natural movement take its course. That's obviously on me. I'm out there trying to make pitches move in ways that they shouldn't and I've gone away from things that have made me successful. The last couple of innings of that game, I felt like I was able to get on top of that and just throw through it and get on top of it."
Will he be able to carry the cut-it-loose anger into his next start?

"Definitely worth a shot," he said.

LeVangie saw the final couple of innings as a potential turning point, noting that Sale's "flow just took off."

"Chris wants to not only be a leader for the Red Sox, but he wants to honor his contract and pitch the length of seasons and whatever," LeVangie said. "So, I wouldn't say that's a bad route for him to take, but what he did maybe after the fact, he got tired of it. There's going to be a next start. I'm pretty sure he's still going to be tired of it."

The Red Sox can only hope Sale stays angry.

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Yankees' Stanton goes back on IL, will miss Red Sox series in London

Yankees' Stanton goes back on IL, will miss Red Sox series in London

Some good news for the Red Sox after another disastrous blown-lead and loss?

They won't have to face Yankees slugger Giancarlo Stanton in London.

After just six games back from his first stint on the injured list, Stanton (who has a homer and seven RBI in nine games) left the Yankees' game Wednesday and was again placed on the 10-day IL with a strained posterior collateral ligament in his right knee.

He had returned June 18 after playing only three games in late March before being shelved with calf, shoulder and biceps injuries. Outfielder Mike Tauchman will be called up from Triple-A and make the trip to London for the series with the Red Sox. 

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