Red Sox

Breakfast Pod: Will the Red Sox trade Mookie Betts this winter?

Breakfast Pod: Will the Red Sox trade Mookie Betts this winter?

What's Mookie's future in Boston? What's the future of the Patriots at QB and defensive coordinator and what's up with new Raider Antonio Brown?

1:12 - John Tomase joins BST to react to the report that the Red Sox may be listening to trade offers for Mookie Betts this winter

5:21 - Paul Perillo stops by BST to talk with Tom Curran and DJ Bean about the impressive performance by the Patriots defense against the Lions Thursday night. They get into the impact new coach Jerod Mayo may have had on the performance.

11:33 - Adam Jones and DJ Bean go around the NFL to discuss some of the latest stories including the report that Antonio Brown told the Raiders he will not play this season if he can't wear his old helmet.

LISTEN & SUBSCRIBE HERE. 

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Report: MLB doesn't want notes from Red Sox investigation used in court

Report: MLB doesn't want notes from Red Sox investigation used in court

As we await Major League Baseball's report on the Red Sox alleged sign-stealing from their 2018 championship season, MLB revealed in court documents that it does not want the notes from its interviews with Red Sox and Houston Astros personnel used in a current trial involving those allegations.

MLB investigator Bryan Seeley argued in a court filing this week that future investigations could be jeopardized if the league reveals details of those interviews, Evan Drellich of The Athletic reports. MLB is being sued by daily fantasy game contestants who argue that the Red Sox' and Astros' schemes corrupted the games.

A decision on the case is expected by April 15. MLB has already disciplined the Astros and it led to the firing of their manager A.J. Hinch and general manager Jeff Luhnow. The Red Sox parted ways with manager Alex Cora for what ownership said was his role in the Astros transgressions.  

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred gave Astros players who cooperated with MLB investigators immunity from his discipline. It's uncertain if the same holds true for Red Sox players. Manfred said last week a report on the Red Sox allegations - delayed by the coronavirus outbreak - would be released before the now-delayed baseball season begins.

Red Sox' Jhonny Pereda among players worried about salary during pandemic

Red Sox' Jhonny Pereda among players worried about salary during pandemic

The Boston Red Sox traded for Chicago Cubs catcher Jhonny Pereda last week in a surprising move for a minor league catcher who was awaiting clarity on his salary amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Pereda, a 23-year-old from Venezuela, relies on his minor league salary to help take care of his family back home and, like many, he's worried about getting paid.

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"I was just hoping and looking forward to the beginning of the season and to start making money," Pereda told ESPN's Joon Lee, through a translator. "I have to give support to my family. When I found out that the season was over, my first thought was, 'What am I going to do?'"

Minor league players don't get paid nearly as much as players in the majors, and Pereda noted that many Latin American athletes come to the United States to be able to provide for their families. 

"Coming from a third-world country where everything is very hard and tough, with the entire situation, I just wish that MLB and other people can help the minor leaguers [more] than they are doing right now because we need that money to live and provide for our families," Pereda said. "I think I can speak for all the Latin-American players, coming from there to the States, when we arrive to this country, it is because we are going to work and we are trying to make money to provide for our families.

"Of course, being in the big leagues, you have all of the attention of the fans and people sometimes don't realize how hard the struggle we have to go through. Only the players know how hard it is to get there because being in the business, you have to go to the minors first."

While Pereda and the minor leaguers are worried about what the future holds, MLB announced Tuesday they would be assisting minor league players throughout the pandemic. Each player will receive $400 per week with medical benefits, according to Ken Rosenthal.

While $400 per week isn't much to buy groceries, pay bills and help out their families, it's a start. In fact, some lower minor league players don't make that much money while veterans in the minors will see a pay reduction. 

For all pro athletes and their fans, and more importantly, everyone's overall health, we can only hope the crisis subsides and sports return as soon as possible.