Red Sox

Ex-Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling weighs in on MLB sign-stealing scandal

Ex-Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling weighs in on MLB sign-stealing scandal

The sign-stealing scandal taking over Major League Baseball has sparked plenty of reaction from former and current players and coaches, along with other prominent figures in the sport.

One of those former players is ex-Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, who isn't one to shy away from sharing his opinions on social media. Schilling took to Twitter to share his take on the 2017 Houston Astros and 2018 Boston Red Sox' involvements in the scandal:


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The "system" Schilling is referring to is a live camera in center field that relayed the catchers' signs to the replay room, where the Astros would bang on a trash can to alert the hitter a certain pitch was coming.

While the '18 Red Sox didn't use the live camera method, they allegedly used similar tactics to steal signs. It's worth noting, however, that it was impossible for them to use the replay room to steal signs during their postseason run, per The Athletic's report.

The MLB's investigation into the Red Sox' sign-stealing operation is ongoing.

Alex Cora was relieved of his duties as Red Sox manager on Tuesday due to his involvement in the Astros scandal. Cora was Houston's bench coach in '17 and played a central role in implementing its sign-stealing system.

John Henry insists Mookie Betts trade wasn't driven by desire to cut payroll

John Henry insists Mookie Betts trade wasn't driven by desire to cut payroll

The Boston Red Sox continue to do damage control after trading away their franchise player.

Many have criticized the Red Sox for dumping outfielder Mookie Betts and pitcher David Price on the Los Angeles Dodgers as a means to get under Major League Baseball's competitive balance tax for 2020.

Principal owner John Henry has deep pockets, after all -- Forbes recently listed his Fenway Sports Group empire as the third-wealthiest sports group in the world at $6.6 billion -- so why couldn't the club shell out a little more money to sign Betts to an extension before he hit free agency in 2021?

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In a recent interview with The Boston Globe's Michael Silverman, Henry defended the team's decision to trade Betts and insisted critics are too focused on his September 2019 comments admitting the Red Sox need to be under the CBT in 2020.

"You’re hung up on CBT," Henry told Silverman. "You see this and I think the media, too, to some extent, ever since we mentioned that clubs have a tendency to get below CBT once in a while."

"It’s surprising that anyone would think we would outspend every other team in baseball every single year. To me, that’s a little surprising. Clubs have to make difficult decisions, and one of the biggest decisions they have to make is, ‘Do we potentially let a great player walk away for very little compensation?’ That’s one of the decisions that you have to make irrespective of CBT – it has nothing to do with CBT."

The Red Sox paid a $13.4 million luxury tax bill for 2019 after boasting the highest payroll in baseball and haven't ranked lower than fifth in spending among MLB clubs under Henry's tenure.

They're not always the highest-spending club, though: Boston has topped the CBT 10 times in the last 17 years, while the rival New York Yankees have exceeded the CBT in every year during that span.

But Henry insisted the luxury tax was "only an element" in trading Betts, and that the Red Sox' return of outfielder Alex Verdugo, infield prospect Jeter Downs and catcher prospect Connor Wong will be better for the club in the long run.

"Maybe you and others at this point undervalue the baseball side of the deal," Henry told Silverman. "We have balance, and not just this year."

That "balance" likely won't lead to more wins in 2020, but Henry seems adamant trading Betts was the right move for the franchise in the long-term -- financials notwithstanding.

Mookie Betts' farewell video will give Red Sox fans all of the emotions

Mookie Betts' farewell video will give Red Sox fans all of the emotions

To Boston Red Sox fans still adjusting to life without Mookie Betts: This may be a tough watch.

The superstar outfielder officially joined the Los Angeles Dodgers one week ago along with pitcher David Price in a blockbuster trade.

Betts was quiet on social media las week (aside from a few Instagram comments) but finally broke his silence Monday morning, posting a 60-second video to Twitter and Instagram thanking Red Sox fans while looking ahead to his Dodgers tenure.

“Nine years. Man, you were great to me, Boston," Betts says in the video, which begins with highlights of his time with the Red Sox.

The way you welcomed me in like family. The bonds that will last a lifetime and the banner that will hang forever. My family and I thank you from the bottom of our hearts."

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The 27-year-old then looked ahead to his Dodgers tenure by putting Boston's multiple championships as a city alongside Los Angeles'. 

"Over the years, I've realized we're all part of something bigger than one person or one city," Betts added. "Though the jersey will change, the mindset will not. From one Titletown to another: Los Angeles, it's showtime."

You could argue Betts is stoking the Boston-L.A. rivalry here by going from "one Titletown to another." But it's hard to see any Red Sox fans taking issue with Betts, who was one of Boston's most well-liked players during his six-year major league tenure.

The former American League MVP is a free agent following the 2020 season, and Boston fans surely would welcome him back with open arms. It sounds like he's fully committed to the Dodgers at the moment, though, leaving locals to come to grips with life without Mookie.