Red Sox

MLB Rumors: Inside MLB's latest plan to return in 2020

MLB Rumors: Inside MLB's latest plan to return in 2020

There still are plenty of hurdles before MLB makes its long-awaited return, but there's reason to be optimistic as the league appears to have a plan in place for 2020.

Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported Saturday that MLB will discuss its plans for the 2020 season in a conference call with owners Monday. If approved, the league will present the plan to the players' union Tuesday.

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The details of the plan, which are subject to change, are as follows:

- The season would begin in early July and have approximately 80 games.

- Teams would face opponents only from their own division and the same geographic division in the opposite league. That means the Red Sox would only face the American League East (Yankees, Rays, Orioles, Blue Jays) and National League East (Mets, Nationals, Phillies, Marlins, Braves).

- Teams would open in as many home ballparks as possible. Alternatives would be spring training parks or nearby MLB stadiums.

- Expanded playoffs. Seven teams from each of the three leagues would qualify for the postseason (an increase from the usual five). Teams with the best record in each division would receive a bye.

- Since games would be played without fans for the foreseeable future, players would be asked to accept a further reduction in pay, most likely by agreeing to a set percentage of revenues for this season only.

Obviously, these significant changes would take some getting used to. But at this point, any safe plan to bring baseball back into our lives is welcomed.

For more details on MLB's potential July return, check out Rosenthal's full report here.

MLB, MLBPA announce initial coronavirus testing results

MLB, MLBPA announce initial coronavirus testing results

MLB and the MLB Players Association announced the results of the league's initial round of coronavirus testing on Friday.

According to their joint statement, 31 players and seven staff members tested positive out of the 3,185 total individuals tested (1.2 positivity rate). Nineteen of 30 teams had positive cases.


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While the results are promising, it's important to note there still will be significant health and safety hurdles for the league to avoid a spread when the 60-game season begins later this month. A number of teams, including the Boston Red Sox, started workouts Friday at their home ballparks.

Sox manager Ron Roenicke said Friday the team has some positive COVID-19 cases. Left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez did not join the rest of the team for the first day of workouts as he was "around somebody who was sick" and awaiting the results of his own coronavirus test.

Fenway Park looks different as Red Sox begin workouts amid COVID-19

Fenway Park looks different as Red Sox begin workouts amid COVID-19

Several months after the COVID-19 pandemic put a sudden halt on spring training, the Red Sox converged on Fenway Park for the first day of Summer Camp workouts Friday.

It's the first time since World War II that the Sox have prepared for a season in the Northeast. That's when the Sox held spring training in Medford, MA (1943), Baltimore, MD (1944), and Pleasantville, NJ (1945).

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With a stress on social distancing and safety, both the on-field workouts and Fenway Park itself look very different in 2020.

The Sox have made some physical changes to the layout of the park's facilities since there won't be fans in attendance anytime soon while media access is also extremely limited.

Click here to see how things look different at Fenway Park.