Red Sox

Question of why Chris Sale still hasn't seen Dr. Andrews for followup is finally asnswered

Question of why Chris Sale still hasn't seen Dr. Andrews for followup is finally asnswered

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- We finally have an explanation for why Chris Sale has missed his six-week checkup with Dr. James Andrews by six weeks and counting -- the Red Sox were hoping he'd be available for the playoffs.

Sale visited the famed orthopedist in August after being placed on the injured list with elbow inflammation. Andrews treated Sale with a plasma-rich platelet injection and shut him down, scheduling a followup that would've coincided with the end of the regular season.

There's a reason for that. The Red Sox were holding out hope that Sale could pitch in October, should Boston reach the playoffs. Once the Red Sox fell hopelessly out of contention -- which was pretty much immediately -- they slowed Sale's timetable.

They now sound cautiously optimistic that the ace left-hander is progressing normally as he rehabs at the team's spring training facilities in Fort Myers, where he also makes his offseason home. There's finally an explanation for why a six-week checkup still hasn't happened 12 weeks later.

"What changed is we fell out of the playoff race," said GM Brian O'Halloran. "We decided to slow it down. It was our decision, it was nothing to do with how things were going. The rehab has gone very well and Chris is right where we want him to be, pending that appointment with Dr. Andrews. When we gave a six-week range, that sort of lined up with the end of the season, and we were holding out hope at that point that we still had a chance to be a postseason team. Very quickly after that, that changed, that didn't happen.

"The six weeks was kind of the early range that we were given by our medical department on what was appropriate on a return to play. Once the postseason was no longer a factor, we decided to take the outer end of the range just because it made the most sense to slow it down and give the most time possible to heal and go from there."

So how is Sale doing? While he's still not throwing -- that won't begin until Andrews re-examines him, O'Halloran said, a visit that hasn't been scheduled yet -- he's progressing.

Sale's agent, B.B. Abbott, told the Boston Globe that Sale has seen multiple doctors this fall, and while they're encouraged by his progress, they still don't know what caused the elbow to flare up. It could've been the shoulder injury that slowed him in 2018, the aftereffects of pitching into late October, or something else entirely.

"I think that certainly some of the lingering stuff from the year before, what he went through, the length of the season, the shoulder, things of that nature might have changed something in him mechanically," Abbott told the Globe. "I don't think they've put their finger on anything specifically, but I do think this full rest, this full time to let the PRP do what it did, and the orthopedic surgeons we spoke to and that the team spoke to, seeing the images, I think was very, very promising."

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Red Sox vs. Blue Jays Highlights: Alex Verdugo homers twice in Boston's second straight win

Red Sox vs. Blue Jays Highlights: Alex Verdugo homers twice in Boston's second straight win

FINAL SCORE: Boston Red Sox 5, Toronto Blue Jays 3

IN BRIEF: Alex Verdugo homered twice and Mitch Moreland added one of his own in the Red Sox' win over the Blue Jays on Friday night. The Red Sox capitalized on a woeful outing from Blue Jays starter Tanner Roark, who walked five batters and allowed four runs in three innings pitched.

Sox starter Ryan Weber allowed two runs in three innings, then the bullpen put together an admirable effort to preserve the lead.

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BOX SCORE

RED SOX RECORD: 5-8

HIGHLIGHTS

Well, that escalated quickly

Verdugo's first Fenway homer

Moreland's two-run shot

Vlad Jr. brings Jays within one

Homer No. 2 for Verdugo...

...and then he robs one!

UP NEXT
vs. Blue Jays, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., NESN
vs. Blue Jays, Sunday, 1:35 p.m., NESN

Red Sox players erect perfect Fenway Park tribute to Dustin Pedroia

red_sox_dustin_pedroia_090715.jpg
File photo

Red Sox players erect perfect Fenway Park tribute to Dustin Pedroia

Dustin Pedroia may not be with his teammates this season, but that doesn't mean he can't watch over them with an iron glare from the best seats in the house.

Red Sox players asked if cutouts of family members could be placed in the box seats behind the home dugout, and the first row includes quite the intimidating image -- Pedroia and his three sons staring at the field, arms folded sternly.

From left to right, Cole, 7, Dylan, 11, and Brooks, 6, mimic their father's pose. All four were fixtures at Fenway Park in recent years before injuries took their toll and effectively ended Pedroia's career.


(Photo via Barry Alley)

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Until being injured on a questionable slide by Manny Machado in 2017, Pedroia was on his way to making a borderline Hall of Fame case for himself. The former Rookie of the Year and MVP played an integral part in two World Series championships, and also earned a ring after appearing in three games for the 2018 club.

The four-time All-Star and four-time Gold Glover went just 2-for-20 in six games last year before shutting it down, probably for good. His six-year, $85 million extension expires after next season.

Even if his Red Sox career is over, his impact on the franchise is not, which is why his teammates have chosen to honor him in a way that perfectly suits his bleep-talking, larger-than-life personality -- by glowering at them like he's about to hurl an insult.


Xander Bogaerts poses next to cardboard cutouts of his mom, Sandra Brown, and his uncle, Glenroy Brown (Photo via Barry Alley).