Red Sox

Red Sox doing right thing by not dealing prospects for Edwin Diaz

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Red Sox doing right thing by not dealing prospects for Edwin Diaz

BOSTON — Acquiring Edwin Diaz in a hypothetical trade would have been a mistake for the Red Sox. Not because he’s anything less than excellent, but because the Sox can’t put all their prospect eggs in one basket, not for a reliever who’s at peak market value — again.

Diaz is reportedly about to be packaged with Robinson Cano in a blockbuster deal with the Mets.

The Sox have already been down the road of trading for premium relievers with years of control, and they’ve been burnt for it. Carson Smith and Tyler Thornburg both haven’t panned out.

Rightly, people can say that the Smith deal -- coincidentally, also with Seattle -- didn’t see the Sox lose any talent they feel regret about. But that’s missing the point. The talent the Sox gave up was talent they theoretically could have used in another way, in another deal.

Going after Diaz would be the opposite of bargain hunting for a team that at some point, if it cares about sustainability, needs to prioritize bargains. The team both depleted its pipeline and has done little to refill it under Dave Dombrowski.

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No one's complaining because they're the reigning champs. Nonetheless, this winter is about the future, and Diaz probably will never command a higher trade value. 

Relievers are volatile year to year, too. They can be pushed aside a bit for starters in the postseason, as the Red Sox showed us themselves in 2018.

Plus, there’s a number of strong relievers available via free agency. The Sox definitely need to add to their ‘pen, or at least maintain the status quo, with Joe Kelly and Craig Kimbrel free agents.

As a general rule of thumb, a team giving up prospects should be less desirable for fans than a team giving up dollars.

We know precisely how teams can acquire young talent, the different avenues. It’s regulated: Clubs get draft picks, some money in the international market. And then from there, you can trade. 

We know what’s in a prospect pool. There are top-10 and top-30 lists readily available. 

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We have no clue, however, about how much money teams actually make, can afford or reasonably should be able to afford. We just just accept that a team will probably stop spending in a certain range.

Let the Red Sox pay for relievers this winter, just in dollars. They're easier to get back than prospects.

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Ex-Red Sox slugger Mike Napoli joins Cubs coaching staff

Ex-Red Sox slugger Mike Napoli joins Cubs coaching staff

Yet another former member of the Boston Red Sox has joined the Chicago Cubs.

Former Sox slugger Mike Napoli has joined the Cubs as a quality assurance coach, according to Jon Heyman of MLB Network.

Napoli joins fellow 2013 World Series champion David Ross on the Cubs staff. Ross replaced Joe Maddon as Chicago's manager last month.

Ex-Red Sox general manager Theo Epstein has served as Cubs president of baseball operations for the last eight years. Former Sox pitching coach Dana LeVangie recently interviewed for the Cubs' bullpen coach job.

In three seasons as Boston's DH/first baseman, Napoli hit .242 with 53 home runs.

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Red Sox, Alex Cora are 'fully cooperating' with MLB's sign-stealing investigation

Red Sox, Alex Cora are 'fully cooperating' with MLB's sign-stealing investigation

The Houston Astros' sign-stealing scheme was rather elboarate, and Boston Red Sox manager Alex Cora reportedly played a major role in the operation.

Cora was Houston manager A.J. Hinch's right-hand man as the Astros' bench coach in 2017, winning the World Series with the organization. So, quite frankly, it's not surprising that Cora was involved in the matter. 

Major League Baseball now is investigating the Astros organization, as well as anyone involved with the team in 2017 -- A.K.A. Cora and current New York Mets manager Carlos Beltran. Cora was interviewed Wednesday, and the Red Sox are offering the MLB "full cooperation" in the ongoing investigation, according to Jason Mastrodonato of the Boston Herald. 

According to our Red Sox Insider John Tomase, the Red Sox really only need to be concerned with the matter if Cora used some of those tactics to lead Boston to a World Series Championship in 2018, and throughout the duration of a rather upsetting 2019 season. 

It remains unknown if Cora will receive any disciplinary action from the league. 

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