Red Sox

Red Sox willing to pay highest luxury tax, weighing need for starting pitcher

Red Sox willing to pay highest luxury tax, weighing need for starting pitcher

WASHINGTON — As Chris Sale gets ready for his third consecutive All-Star start, his bosses are contemplating the need to add to the rotation behind him.

With the best record in baseball (68-30) and 64 games remaining, the Red Sox have a willingness to cross baseball’s highest luxury tax threshold and take on a payroll above $237 million this year, team president and CEO Sam Kennedy said. 

President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski prefers not to make the jump if avoidable, as most anyone would, but Dombrowski has never shut the door on climbing payroll further. Now, with two weeks until the non-waiver trade deadline, the Sox have to weigh a new wrinkle: the potential need for a starting pitcher, because of an ankle injury to Eduardo Rodriguez that involves serious ligament damage.

“There’s a willingness from our bosses,” Kennedy told NBC Sports Boston in Washington D.C., where he was on hand for an All-Star Game loaded with Sox. “John [Henry] and Tom [Werner] have made very clear to me and to Dave: Look, let’s see how the market develops, and we want to do what it takes to try and win a fourth World Series championship. I don’t know how the market’s going to play out, but we’re getting close here. 

“But there would be a willingness to do that if it meant, in our estimation, making a decision that could really help put us over the edge, over the top, this year and the postseason. You know, we had the taste of October the last two years. There’s no question, we’re hungry for October success.”

There is no such thing as an over-the-top postseason move, because of the uncertainty of a short-series format. The Sox already had interest in adding a reliever for their bullpen. But adding a rotation piece may be more relevant to the goal that has less randomness at play with about 40 percent of the season remaining: holding on to the division.

How much faith the Sox have in both Drew Pomeranz and Steven Wright to return to health and effectiveness may be discernible based on the team’s actions, or non-actions, via trade.

“Right now, we will analyze our situation and see what happens,” Dombrowski wrote in an email when asked about his interest in a starter and the outlook for Pomeranz and Wright.

"Dave and I have had lots of discussions about it, and to me, from looking back to the years where we have gotten over the hump in the postseason, a lot of times it’s the obscure speed-on-the-bases [type] or you know, last guy out of the bullpen,” Kennedy said. “But when it comes to October, pitching, pitching, is probably — we’ll see. 

“It depends what happens with Steven Wright, Drew Pomeranz. We got a little bit of time to figure that out. I think if you held a gun to my head, I would always support more pitching. Pitching pitching pitching. Dave and Alex Cora, they’ll make their assessment. 

“I can tell you one thing, John [Henry] and Tom [Werner] and I will be there at the ready to support what they want to do. This obviously has the makings of a very special, special season.”

E-Rod may be out until September. Even if he returns quickly, how effective he is coming off an injury may be something of a wild card. The Sox have seen firsthand this year how players returning from injuries can experience complications. 

Rodriguez had a history of knee subluxations, and his confidence on the mound coming back from those subluxations was low. Still, that was likely in part because the chance of recurrence was particularly high. Rodriguez's history does not necessarily mean that every injury he faces will provide a confidence issue. 

Nonetheless, his ankle injury is to the same right leg that he had surgery on to prevent knee subluxations.

One gamble the Sox could take: if they believe E-Rod can return this year, he could be a decent bullpen addition because of his strikeout stuff. If the Sox believed E-Rod could mentally and physically handle that transition coming off an injury, they could prioritize adding a starting pitcher over a reliever, on the hopes that the bullpen will gain help from E-Rod, or perhaps from Pomeranz or Wright. But that would be a gamble, and adding both a starter and reliever would be safest.

“In regards to E-Rod pitching in relief, it is much too early to answer that question,” Dombrowski wrote.

Going over the $237 million threshold (as calculated for luxury tax purposes, which is slightly different than the actual dollar figure the Sox are paying players this season) would mean the Sox would pick 10 spots lower in next year’s amateur draft. As Alex Speier of the Boston Globe has noted, the difference between a pick near No. 30 (the best teams receive the lowest picks), as opposed to No. 40, historically has not been large. 

In the case of the Sox this year, they would pay a 62.5 percent tax on every dollar spent above $237 million. They are already paying a 20 percent tax on every dollar from $197 million up to $217 (so, $4 million), and 32 percent on every dollar above $217 million (roughly $6 million, depending on where exactly they stand today).

NBC SPORTS BOSTON SCHEDULE

Red Sox want Betts for 'whole baseball career'

Red Sox want Betts for 'whole baseball career'

BOSTON — Whether the Red Sox can keep Mookie Betts from testing free agency will be a hot topic until, well, he either hits free agency or agrees to a deal. 

At the least, ownership has a continued, stated interest in locking him up long term, as would be expected with the American League MVP.

“He’s one of the great players of our generation," Tom Werner said Friday at Winter Weekend. "Obviously, if we have conversations, they will be private, but it’s our hope that he’ll be a Red Sox player for his whole baseball career."

⚾️MORE JOHN HENRY

When asked about extensions generally, one thing Henry noted is that players appear more interested in reaching free agency rather than signing extensions earlier.

“Another thing in this free agency we’ve seen is that they’re used to be younger players signing long-term deals before they got to free agency,” Henry said. “But it seems like more and more players are going to free agency, and so you’re seeing less and less in the way of extensions.”

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Celtics easily on your device.

Red Sox owner says young players' production impacting free agency

Red Sox owner says young players' production impacting free agency

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. — In a slow offseason, albeit one in which the Red Sox were not expected to do much, Red Sox owner John Henry gave some insight into his views of the free-agent marketplace and baseball’s economic landscape.

Here's his lengthy assessment:

“Twenty years ago, roughly I think 45 percent of wins above replacement were due to players that were beyond six years of service,” Henry said. “That number now is 25 percent. I think that clubs, including the Red Sox, have been slow to sort of adjust. I think that the price of a win above replacement, which is what a lot of clubs look at — some clubs, including us, look at much more than that — but if you just look at that as one thing that a number of clubs look at, I remember five years ago, I think that number was something like $5 or $6 million, maybe as much as $7 million dollars per win. Now, it’s $10 million dollars. 

“We have a lot more production something from younger players for whatever reason. I think that has negatively impacted free agency. Also, there has been a lot of money paid at the very top, by that, I mean very top players. There are something like 45 or 50 players that are paid more than $20 million a year at this point, so that means above average, average free agents are not getting the kind of deals they probably should get. 

“It’s complicated, but there’s certainly not any lack of desire among teams to win. People talk about tanking, but … pretty much all American sports have a system where, if you finish low, you get a high draft pick. There’s going to be, when you’re not competitive in a particular year, you don’t have a real incentive to change that.

“And in fact, it’s a problem with basketball, it’s a problem with baseball, but the only way you can change it is if you get rid of the draft system that we have, and I’m not sure that’s a thing to do.”

⚾️MORE JOHN HENRY

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Celtics easily on your device.