Alex Rodriguez

Alex Rodriguez's World Series tweet prompted this obvious Red Sox reference

Alex Rodriguez's World Series tweet prompted this obvious Red Sox reference

Alex Rodriguez is paid to share his opinions about baseball. But sometimes those opinions clash with his own history.

A thrilling Game 6 of the World Series on Tuesday night was interrupted by controversy in the seventh inning, when Washington Nationals baserunner Trea Turner was called out for interfering with Houston Astros first baseman Yuli Gurriel.

Here's the play in question: Turner appeared to run in a straight line after hitting a weak ground ball but inadvertently knocked Gurriel's glove off his hand.

Umpire Sam Holbrook ruled that Turner interfered with the throw by running on the left side of the foul line in "unprotected" territory. But Rodriguez's (among others) clearly disagreed, and voiced his opinion on Twitter as Holbrook's crew discussed the call.

Where's the humor in this tweet? Surely you remember Game 6 of the 2004 American League Championship Series between Rodriguez's New York Yankees and the rival Boston Red Sox, when A-Rod literally slapped the ball out of pitcher Bronson Arroyo's glove while running to first base.

Veteran pitcher (and former Yankee) Phil Hughes sure does.

Hughes was one of many on Twitter to remind A-Rod of his own history with baserunner's interference.

The umpires upheld the call and ruled Turner out, prompting the expected angry tweet from Rodriguez.

By the letter of the MLB Rulebook, the umps technically got the call right, as a baserunner who runs on the left side of the foul line in fair play can be deemed as interfering.

You could argue that's a dumb rule, but Anthony Rendon made sure it didn't matter anyway, blasting a two-run home run later in the inning to help the Nationals win 7-2 and force a Game 7 on Wednesday night.

If only Rodriguez could say the same about his 2004 Yankees...

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Watch David Ortiz and Alex Rodriguez reminisce on 2004 ALCS

Watch David Ortiz and Alex Rodriguez reminisce on 2004 ALCS

Fifteen years ago, the Boston Red Sox pulled off the impossible vs. the New York Yankees in the 2004 American League Championship Series.

David Ortiz and Alex Rodriguez took a trip down memory lane to relive the unforgettable moments in a nostalgia-filled video for FOX Sports. The two legends relive everything from A-Rod slapping the ball out of Bronson Arroyo's glove to Curt Schilling's bloody sock.

A-Rod shared the video and wrote about his painful memories from the series on Twitter. Watch and read below:

Credit to Rodriguez for being a good sport (imagine reading that sentence 15 years ago?...)

The Yankees could find themselves ousted from another ALCS on Friday night when they take on the Astros in a do-or-die Game 5. They would have to win three straight games, including two on the road, to advance to the World Series.

The last team to do that? You guessed it. The '04 Red Sox.

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Alex Rodriguez was 'completely bummed' not to join Red Sox in 2003

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USA TODAY Sports photo

Alex Rodriguez was 'completely bummed' not to join Red Sox in 2003

Fifteen years ago, the Red Sox and Rangers agreed to terms on a deal that would have sent slugging shortstop Alex Rodriguez to Boston and changed the course of the franchise.

The trade fell through at the last minute, however, when the Major League Players Association ruled against Rodriguez taking a voluntary pay cut. Instead, A-Rod ended up with the archrival New York Yankees, and we know how the story goes from there.

Even after enjoying 12 seasons in the Bronx and becoming a World Series champion, Rodriguez explained on "Dale & Keefe" as part of the WEEI/NESN Jimmy Fund Radio-Telethon he still thinks "what if?" about a career in Boston.

“Oh my God, yes. I have thought about it a lot," Rodriguez said. "It was such an exciting time for me. I knew how great the Red Sox were going to be. Could I have forecasted four championships? Probably not, but I knew at least a couple in there. I thought that after spending a lot of time with John Henry down here in Florida at my home in Miami and his home in Boca, I knew that this was someone who had incredible passion and knowledge and knew how to put a winning team around him — on the field and in the front office.

"After talking with Theo (Epstein) and Jed Hoyer, and now they have Sam Kennedy, he just surrounds himself with incredible people. I just thought the combination between John Henry, who is a hedge fund wizard, Tom Werner, who is the king of Hollywood and putting great shows together, and then a lawyer like Larry Lucchino, I just thought they were a triple threat. And then they had Theo. I said this is a place that I can win and win for a long time."

A-Rod admitted he initially was upset not to be a part of the Red Sox organization.

"I was completely bummed it collapsed," he said. "It was so depressing never knowing that the Yankees were even an option at that point. And of course, a few weeks later I sat next to Brian Cashman in New York collecting my MVP award. … And then a few weeks later I have my press conference in New York."

Everything ended up working out just fine for both sides. Boston went on to win a championship the very next season (2004) and add three more. Rodriguez made approximately $317 million while with the Yankees and earned a ring of his own in 2009.

Still, it's difficult not to think about what the state of both franchises would be today had the MLBPA not stepped in to prevent the blockbuster trade.

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