Ben Watson

Tom Brady, Patriots show Ben Watson love as TE announces retirement

Tom Brady, Patriots show Ben Watson love as TE announces retirement

We don't know where Tom Brady will play in 2020, but we know he still keeps tabs on his now-former teammates.

Ben Watson announced his retirement Monday on social media, ending any speculation he'd return in 2020 after coming out of a first retirement in 2019 to play for the New England Patriots.

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Thank you.

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The 39-year-old also paid homage to all five teams he played for during his 15-year career, starting with the Patriots, who selected the tight end in the first round (No. 32 overall) of the 2004 NFL Draft.

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#GoPats

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Watson's tribute to the Patriots earned him shout-outs from the team's Instagram account ("Thank you, Ben"), as well as Brady, who dropped three heart emojis in the comment section of Watson's post.

Patriots running back Brandon Bolden, offensive lineman David Andrews and safety Duron Harmon also gave Watson props, with Harmon writing on Watson's retirement Instagram post:

"Appreciate you setting the example on and off the field my brother! Enjoy retirement because you deserve it 💪🏿"

But Brady's Instagram activity is most notable considering the NFL's legal tampering window opened Monday, allowing teams to contact the pending free-agent quarterback.

Brady was on vacation in Costa Rica with his family but has returned stateside ahead of his big decision, per NFL Media's Ian Rapoport.

Brady and Watson share a very tight bond, but the latter didn't contribute much on the field in his final NFL season, with 17 catches for 173 yards and no touchdowns in 10 games played.

Patriots 2020 NFL free agency primer: Answers at tight end available in free agency

Patriots 2020 NFL free agency primer: Answers at tight end available in free agency

Editor's Note: Phil Perry will be taking an in-depth look at each of the Patriots' position groups between now and when the NFL's 2020 free agency period begins, spotlighting the current roster and what names might be available on the market.

Arguably the weakest tight end group in the NFL, the Patriots got little production from the trio of Ben Watson, Matt LaCosse and Ryan Izzo for much of the year — both as receivers and run-blockers. After featuring a Hall of Famer at that position for the previous decade in Rob Gronkowski, it was a steep drop-off in terms of the performance here.

All three options missed time while hurt, and Watson was suspended the first four games of the year. None cracked 200 yards receiving. They combined for two touchdowns. They held the No. 56 (LaCosse), 96 (Watson) and 130 (Izzo) spots among run-blockers at the position in 2019, per Pro Football Focus.

Watson has announced he'll retire, but both Izzo and LaCosse are both on the roster for 2020. Still, this position needs addressing maybe more so than any other on the roster. 

PLAYER-BY-PLAYER LOWDOWN

Matt LaCosse: Signed on Day 1 of free agency last March, LaCosse never seemed to fully get his legs under him in the Patriots offense. He missed the season-opener injured and played just two games before the Patriots bye. He caught six passes in the team's final four games. The Patriots could release him and save over $1 million against the cap with just $150,000 of dead money counting toward their books.

Ryan Izzo: The second-year tight end out of Florida State took a red-shirt year in 2018 and played in six games last season. He was targeted nine times, caught six passes and scored once in Washington. He's under contract through 2021.

Ben Watson: Watson's year got off to a rocky start as he was released before he could be activated off of the suspended list. A week later, he was signed to try to provide the Patriots passing game with a bit of a boost. With LaCosse injured and Izzo the only occasional contributor, the position was in dire need. In Week 11 he caught three passes for 52 yards in a win over the Eagles, which was his highest yardage output of the year. He turned 39 on December 18 and will apparently stay retired after 15 years in the league. 

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James Develin: We'll include Patriots fullbacks in this conversation since those players meet with the tight ends on a daily basis in New England. Develin suffered a neck injury and was placed on injured reserve after just two games. He did remain with the team and served as somewhat of a coaching assistant, serving as a presence on the sidelines on game days and in the locker room during the week. He's under contract for one more season. 

Jakob Johnson: Brought to the Patriots via the International Player Pathway Program, Bill Belichick was very open about the fact that the Patriots would have never taken a chance on Johnson had it not been for the league mandating that each AFC East club take on an international player to serve as an 11th player on their practice squad in 2019. Johnson impressed to the point that the Patriots actually activated him to the roster. He played in four games before suffering a shoulder injury that landed him on IR. He's under contract for 2020.

POTENTIAL FREE-AGENT FIXES: BIG SWINGS

Hunter Henry: The Patriots may want to dip into free-agency to address their tight end spot. It's a difficult position to grasp for young players for a variety of reasons — the volume in the running and passing games, in particular, can be overwhelming — meaning a veteran might be a better option for a team that has an immediate need like New England.

Henry is arguably the best of the bunch. The 6-foot-5, 250-pounder recorded a career-high 652 yards last season on 55 grabs. He's not a game-changer in the running game — PFF ranked him as the league's 73rd best run-blocker at the position last season — but the Patriots need weapons, and Henry might be the best where they need the most help. Would the Patriots be willing to pony up about $9 million per year for him, though?

Austin Hooper: This 6-foot-4, 254-pounder has done a better job of staying healthy (missed only three games the last three seasons) than Henry (missed all of 2018) and he's been more productive in a pass-happy offense. Hooper had 75 catches for 787 yards and six scores last year. The catch? It might cost about $10 million per year to lock him up. Or he may never become available. He's a candidate to be franchised this offseason. Like Henry, Hooper's not moving mountains in the run game (PFF's No. 77 run-blocker), but he's a dynamic receiver in the short-to-intermediate range. 

POTENTIAL FREE-AGENT FIXES: FLAWED BUT INTRIGUING

Tyler Eifert: He's a seven-year veteran. He's played 59 of a possible 112 games in that time. He's a career Bengal. But the knocks on Eifert's resume should make him incredibly affordable in 2020. And though he played just six games in 2017 and 2018 combined, he bounced back this season to play in all 16, catching 43 passes for 436 yards. 

Eric Ebron: The Colts didn't seem thrilled with the way Ebron's season went. He landed on injured reserve with an ankle issue after catching 31 passes for 375 yards and three scores. After the season, general manager Chris Ballard told reporters the team would be moving on. Ebron is only a season removed from catching 66 passes and 13 touchdowns. If he's healthy, there's no doubt he'd provide the tight end group in New England a talent upgrade.

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Ben Watson makes surprising revelation about 2019 season with Patriots

Ben Watson makes surprising revelation about 2019 season with Patriots

Ben Watson apparently battled more than Father Time last season.

The New England Patriots tight end claimed in an Instagram story Friday he played through a torn Achilles during the 2019 season and thanked a body coach at Tom Brady's TB12 Sports Therapy Center for helping him play through the injury.

Watson didn't reveal when he suffered the injury, but he played in every Patriots game after making his season debut in Week 7. (He served a four-game suspension after failing a drug test, was released on Oct. 7 and re-signed with the team on Oct. 15.)

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While the 39-year-old tight end didn't contribute much in the passing game -- 17 receptions for 173 yards and zero touchdowns -- it's significant that he was even playing at all, considering he missed the entire 2016 season after tearing his right Achilles tendon in the preseason.

Watson's resilience -- and the fact that he sought treatment at the TB12 facility -- may explain why Brady had such heartfelt praise for the 15-year veteran following New England's Wild Card Round loss to the Tennessee Titans.

Watson strongly hinted at retirement following that game, and given that he apparently has to rehab a torn Achilles, it'd be difficult to fathom him returning for another NFL season.