Georges-Hunt takes a (long) shot at making the Celtics' roster

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Georges-Hunt takes a (long) shot at making the Celtics' roster

We've been taking a look at each player at the Celtics roster: Their strengths and their weaknesses, their ceiling and their floor. We conclude today with Marcus Georges-Hunt

BOSTON -- Who is Marcus Georges-Hunt?
 
Many within Celtics Nation sprinted to Google or whatever your search engine of choice is, to find out as much as they could about the former Georgia Tech standout, who signed a training camp deal with the Boston Celtics. 

RELATED: Click here for more Ceiling-to-Floor profiles.
 
Here’s the skinny:
 
Georges-Hunt is a 6-foot-5 college combo guard who has shown an ability to play -- and play well -- whatever position where he's needed in order for his team to be successful.
 
But there’s little hope that the undrafted Georges-Hunt will see a similar career trajectory as a professional.
 
But, hey, he has a training camp invite (after playing on Brooklyn’s summer league team, where he averaged 2.8 points in four games) which says he’s a player the Celtics deem at least worth taking a closer look at for the Maine Red Claws in training camp.  
 
The Ceiling for Georges-Hunt: 15-man roster
 
Georges-Hunt would have to play the absolute best basketball of his life and chances are that still won’t be enough for him to move up the depth chart past the slew of players on the bubble who have guaranteed or partially guaranteed deals such as his (he’ll get $25,000 if he’s cut).
 
The one thing Georges-Hunt showed in college was a steady level of improvement in most categories. 
                      
A double-digit scorer in each of his four seasons at Georgia Tech, Georges-Hunt’s scoring average went from 10.8 as a freshman to a career-best 16.7 points as a senior.
 
And in his final season, he connected on 34.2 percent of his 3s, shot 82.3 percent from the free-throw line and dished out 3.3 assists per game -- all career highs.
 
Georgia Tech moved him to the point guard position on Jan. 9 against Virginia. From that point on, he averaged 17.9 points and 3.8 assists per game.
 
Georges-Hunt’s versatility is indeed one of his strengths, but the 22-year-old will be hard-pressed to showcase that in camp with a Celtics team that’s extremely deep on the perimeter as well as at the wing position. 
 
The Floor for Georges-Hunt: D-League or overseas
 
Georges-Hunt was the last player signed by Boston and in all likelihood he’ll be the first cut. The greatest benefit for him is that being around the Celtics coaching staff and learning their system will benefit him greatly if he’s waived and then decides to sign with the Maine Red Claws. 
 
That in all likelihood will be the route taken by Georges-Hunt, an All-ACC performer last season.

Celtics' Ceiling-to-Floor profiles: An award-winning summer for Rozier?

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Celtics' Ceiling-to-Floor profiles: An award-winning summer for Rozier?

Every weekday until Sept. 7, we'll take a look at each player at the Celtics roster: Their strengths and their weaknesses, their ceiling and their floor. We continue today with Terry Rozier. For a look at the other profiles, click here.

BOSTON -- Terry Rozier has every reason to feel good about himself after this year's Summer League, where he was clearly the Boston Celtics’ best player. 
 
But what does Summer League success really mean in the grand scheme of things?
 
This isn’t the Olympics, where a good couple of weeks in the summer can lead to sudden endorsement opportunities. And a bad summer, on or off the court, won’t necessarily result in your personal stock taking a Ryan Lochte-like dip, either.
 
For Rozier, the summer has been a continuation of his emergence during the playoffs last season against the Atlanta Hawks, when his numbers were significantly better across the board in comparison to what he did during the regular season.
 
And while his role at this point remains uncertain, there’s a growing sense that what we saw in the summer was more than just Rozier making the most of his opportunity to play. 
 
It was the 6-foot-2 guard playing with the kind of confidence and overall swagger that Boston hopes to see more of in this upcoming season.  
  
The Ceiling for Rozier: Most Improved Player, Sixth Man candidate
 
Rozier never wanted to see teammate Avery Bradley suffer a hamstring injury in Game 1 of Boston’s first-round series with Atlanta last season. But he knows if not for that injury, he wouldn't have played as much as he did, nor would he be viewed as someone who could seriously compete for minutes this season. 
 
That injury afforded Rozier playing time he had not seen in the 39 regular-season games he appeared in, when he averaged 8.0 minutes per contest.
 
In the playoffs, Rozier saw his playing time increase to 19.8 minutes per game, which naturally led to a rise in all of his statistics. 
 
It did more than help the Celtics compete with the Hawks. It provided a huge confidence boost for Rozier this past summer and will do the same going into training camp, where he believes he will be better-equipped to compete for playing time. 
 
Rozier already plays above-average defense for the Celtics. The big question mark for him has been whether he can knock down shots consistently. It certainly didn’t look that way during the regular season, when he shot 22.2 percent on 3s and just 27.4 percent from the field. 
 
Although the sample size is much smaller, he was able to shoot 39.1 percent from the field and 36.4 percent on 3s in the five playoff games he appeared in this past spring. 
 
So both Rozier and the Celtics feel good about the fact that his game in key areas such as shooting and assists are trending in the right direction. 
 
And if that continues he'll solidify a spot high atop the second unit, which could translate into him having a shot at garnering some Most Improved Player recognition.
 
The Floor for Rozier: Active roster
 
While his minutes may not improve significantly from a year ago, Rozier will likely enter training camp with a spot in Boston’s regular playing rotation.
 
On most nights the Celtics are likely to play at least four guards: Isaiah Thomas, Avery Bradley, Marcus Smart and Rozier. 
 
Look for him to get most of the minutes left behind by Evan Turner, who was signed by Portland to a four-year, $70 million deal this summer. 
 
Of course, Rozier’s minutes will be impacted in some way by how those ahead of him perform. But Rozier can’t consume himself with such thoughts. 
 
He has to force the Celtics’ coaches to keep him on the floor, And the only way to do that is to play well and contribute to the team’s success in a meaningful way. 
 
While his shooting has improved, Rozier is at his best when he lets his defense dictate his play offensively. 
 
In the playoffs last season, Rozier averaged 1.2 fast-break points per game, which was fifth on the team. 
 
Just to put that in perspective, Rozier averaged 19.8 minutes in the postseason. The four players ahead of him (Bradley, Thomas, Turner and Smart) each averaged more than 32 minutes of court time per night.
 
While it’s too soon to tell where Rozier fits into the rotation this season, his play this summer and overall body of work dating back to the playoffs last season makes it difficult to envision him not being on the active roster for most, if not all, of this season.

Ceiling-to-Floor profile: Smart's defense gives him a shot at stardom

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Ceiling-to-Floor profile: Smart's defense gives him a shot at stardom

Every weekday until Sept. 7, we'll take a look at each player at the Celtics roster: Their strengths and their weaknesses, their ceiling and their floor. We continue today with Marcus Smart. For a look at the other profiles, click here.

BOSTON --  As a member of the USA Select Team this summer, Marcus Smart had a chance to play with and against some of the NBA's best. 
 
Not surprisingly, Smart played physical defense.
 
He made a few shots, too. 

Smart delivered the kind of all-around performance in Las Vegas that left an indelible impression as to the potential he has to become one of the better guards in the NBA someday. 

But will that day be this season?
 
After all, Isaiah Thomas is an All-Star point guard and his backcourt mate Avery Bradley is a first-team All-NBA defender. Their presence has certainly limited some of the opportunities Smart has had to display his skills.
 
But that won’t keep him off the floor this season or from logging significant minutes as the Celtics look to continue their ascension up the Eastern Conference standings.
 
Here’s a look at the ceiling for Smart’s game this season as well as the floor.
 
The ceiling for Smart: Starter, All-NBA defensive selection

 
Smart continues to make his mark on the NBA with his defense, combining some really nifty physical skills with an absolute bad-ass mentality towards locking up whoever he's assigned to defend. 
 
The 6-foot-4 Smart will tackle smaller guards like Matthew Dellavedova, or play a little bump-and-grind on the block with 7-footer Kristaps Porzingis. Stints defending elite scorers like LeBron James, Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook are part of the job defensively for Smart, as well. 
 
Of course, Smart gets a heavy dose of praise for his physical play defensively, but so much of what he does centers around his hustle and overall effort.

In what was a season which Smart’s hustle play was recognized with a few All-NBA Defensive Team votes, one of the more memorable moments came when he was able to out-hustle San Antonio’s Tony Parker for a loose ball, leadin g to a Boston lay-up. 

But any tale about Smart’s effort defensively has to also include some mention of flopping, something he's been accused of from time to time. And on more than one occasion he's been guilty of this, without question.  
 
Still, with his aggressiveness and resume full of difference-making, high impact plays in his first two NBA seasons, there’s no reason to doubt Smart will become officially one of the league’s top defenders and occupy a spot on the NBA’s All-Defensive Teams sooner or later, and with that a potential spot as a starter.
 
For that latter point to happen, Smart’s shooting has to improve appreciably. Last season he shot 25.3 percent on 3s, with a career 29.6 percent shooting mark from 3-point range. 
 
With Evan Turner (Portland) no longer with the Celtics, Smart should have a few more opportunities to score now than he had in the past.
 
And while no deal is imminent, Bradley’s name was among those thrown around as possibly being on the move this season. If the Celtics decide to go that route, that, too, would open up an opportunity for Smart to become a starter. 
 
The floor for Smart: Rotation player
 
If Smart doesn’t make the kind of strides he and the Celts are aiming for this season, worst-case scenario is he will remain a player in the Celtics’ regular rotation. 
 
His versatility as a defender is just too valuable to leave at the end of their bench, regardless of how much he may struggle at times offensively.
 
If he continues to struggle, the more he’ll be seen as a one-dimensional (defense) player and with that, see his role -- and potential playing time -- more limited.
 
But coming off the bench, Smart has shown himself capable of holding his own as a defender against some of the backcourt scorers in the NBA. 
 
Lou Williams, the league’s Sixth Man of the Year in 2015, was a 33.3 percent shooter against Smar,t according to nbasavant.com. Other big-time scorers such as Westbrook (4-for-11, 36.4 percent), Kemba Walker (3-for-11, 27.3 percent) and high-scoring guard James Harden (3-for-10, 30 percent) have all had their share of struggles knocking down shots when Smart has been defending them.
 
Both Smart and the Celtics are optimistic that his shooting will only improve with time. But in case he continues to have problems, Boston can take solace in the fact that it has one of the more promising, up-and-coming defenders in Smart, whose play at that end of the floor is good enough to where minutes will continue to come his way regardless of what he contributes offensively.