Chris Paul

WATCH: Chris Paul calls out 'privileged' fan at Celtics-Thunder game

WATCH: Chris Paul calls out 'privileged' fan at Celtics-Thunder game

A memo to NBA fans: If you heckle Chris Paul, be prepared for the consequences.

According to NBC Sports Boston's Abby Chin, the Oklahoma City Thunder guard didn't like something a fan sitting courtside at TD Garden said to him early in Sunday's game against the Boston Celtics.

So, Paul called the fan out.

After calling the young fan "privileged," Paul went back to shake the teenager's hand and give him a little piece of his mind.

LIVE stream the Celtics all season and get the latest news and analysis on all of your teams from NBC Sports Boston by downloading the My Teams App.

Here's video of that exchange, as aired on NBC Sports Boston:

 

All things considered, Paul handled this pretty well by shaking the kid's hand and calmly making his point rather than escalating the situation.

As for the "privileged" kid: He got to shake Chris Paul's hand (even if his friend wasn't so lucky) and might think twice about heckling opposing players in the future.

The Thunder also left the Garden with a 105-104 win thanks in large part to Paul, who helped force a Kemba Walker turnover that led to Dennis Schroder's go-ahead layup and then locked up Jayson Tatum on Boston's final possession.

Sounds like he got his message across.

Don't miss NBC Sports Boston's coverage of Pacers-Celtics, which begins Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. with Celtics Pregame Live, followed by tip-off at 7 p.m. You can also stream on the MyTeams App.

Celtics' Jayson Tatum hopes to add lessons learned from All-Star vets to his game

Celtics' Jayson Tatum hopes to add lessons learned from All-Star vets to his game

CHICAGO — Talent alone has not gotten Jayson Tatum to where he’s at now in the NBA.

At every stage of his development, there have been lessons learned from sage veterans who have in some way contributed to his steady progress.

So it’s no surprise that one of the biggest takeaways for Tatum during All-Star Weekend was taking away as much knowledge as he could from more seasoned All-Stars. 

Among them was Chris Paul, a 10-time All-Star who plays for the Oklahoma City Thunder and was instrumental in Team LeBron’s 157-155 win over Team Giannis in Sunday’s All-Star Game. 

LIVE stream the Celtics all season and get the latest news and analysis on all of your teams from NBC Sports Boston by downloading the My Teams App.

During the practice session prior to Sunday’s game, the two had an animated conversation that eventually included Paul walking Tatum through how he at 6-foot, was able to defend Tatum — eight inches taller — when the Thunder and Celtics met prior to the All-Star break. 

NBA.com/stats shows that Tatum was 2-for-4 shooting when defended by Paul, with six points coming on a pair of 3's. 

But what doesn't show up in the numbers was how Paul was able to prevent Tatum from posting up, something Tatum talked to Paul about during their All-Star practice session. 

It was the kind of exchange that speaks to Tatum's willingness to learn from those around him, and only adds to the narrative about Paul this season as a player who not only continues to play at a high level but is open to helping the next generation of NBA greats to improve their overall games as well. 

For Tatum, all of the veteran All-Stars were more than open to providing a few tips about their game. 

“It’s real cool, especially coming from Chris,” Tatum, who had six points for Team LeBron, told NBC Sports Boston. “He’s been a really good player for a really long time; I’m trying to be like that, too.”

Tatum said he has known Paul dating back to when he was in high school, which is when one of Tatum’s best friends and former Duke teammate Harry Giles played for Paul’s AAU team. 

But as cool as Paul was in discussing how he defended Tatum, there are still parts of Paul’s game Tatum already knows he won’t divulge. 

“He didn’t show me everything,” Tatum said, grinning. “But he showed me a couple things. I’m gonna try and use that next time we play.”

This Friday is Jayson Tatum Day here at NBC Sports Boston. Be sure to check out our exclusive content around Tatum throughout the day, both online and on the broadcast of Celtics-Timberwolves.

Jayson Tatum, NBA All-Stars honor Kobe Bryant with well-played All-Star game

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USA Today Sports Images

Jayson Tatum, NBA All-Stars honor Kobe Bryant with well-played All-Star game

CHICAGO -- The untimely death of Kobe Bryant was the theme leading up to Sunday night’s All-Star game which was won by Team LeBron, 157-155.

The night began with a series of tributes to Bryant which included a stirring speech given by Los Angeles Lakers legend Magic Johnson.

Throughout Johnson’s speech, there was the occasional “Ko-be, Ko-be, Ko-be!” chant from the stands.

And the actual game itself was one of the better-played All-Star games in recent memory courtesy of a new format that seemed to go over well with all involved. 

LIVE stream the Celtics all season and get the latest news and analysis on all of your teams from NBC Sports Boston by downloading the My Teams App.

The game came down to big shots and big stops by both teams, a fitting end to the night considering how all involved wanted to honor Kobe Bryant and did just that with a brand of basketball that in many ways was part of the Kobe narrative of elite play at both ends of the floor. 

Chris Paul acknowledged the challenge of playing the game at a high level and not think about Bryant who was a major influence for many of today’s All-Star players. 

“It was tough early, especially early,” Paul said. “For a lot of us, it's still surreal. It's not real until you start showing pictures and talking about it. But I think the best way we could honor Kobe, Gigi, and everyone involved was to play like we played, you know what I Mean? Me and Russ (Russell Westbrook) kept talking about it, that's one thing about Kobe, whenever he was on our team in the All-Star Game, there wasn't none of that cool stuff. There wasn't none of that. It was like, as long as they throw the ball up, let's get to it.”

LeBron James added, “You could definitely feel his presence just from the start. From every moment from the fans chanting his name till you seen the numbers. Every time you saw Giannis' team run on the floor, you saw the 2-4. So he was definitely here.”

Former NBA All-Star Richard “Rip” Hamilton was among those in attendance at the game. 

He and Bryant were both prep stars who grew up competing with and against each other in Pennsylvania and were at times roommates during all-star competitions.

Hamilton acknowledged he still hasn’t fully come to grips with what happened to Bryant and the others. 

“It hurt me, man, it hurt me to my core,” Hamiton told NBC Sports Boston. “And I still haven’t fully recovered from it. Him and I go back way before the NBA and the glitz and glamor and everything else. It’s a thing that … it still impacts me to this day.”

And once the current crop of All-Star players stepped on the floor, Team Giannis wore jersey number 24 (Kobe Bryant’s number) while Team LeBron wore jersey number 2 (the number of GiGi Bryant, Kobe’s daughter). 

Boston’s Jayson Tatum is among the many players on the floor whose game was heavily influenced by Bryant who along with his daughter Gigi, was killed along with seven others in a helicopter crash on Jan. 26. 

The relationship between Tatum and Bryant had grown into a friendship strengthened by Bryant’s interest in mentoring Tatum who has never shied away from acknowledging how influential Bryant has been in his life, both on the court as well as off the court since coming into the NBA. 

“He was the reason I started playing basketball,” Tatum said recently. “To have him reach out and try and help me, wanna work with me was something I would never forget.”