Jeremy Jacobs

Jeremy Jacobs has no plans to step down as NHL chairman: 'I enjoy the business of hockey'

Jeremy Jacobs has no plans to step down as NHL chairman: 'I enjoy the business of hockey'

BRIGHTON, Mass – While news broke this summer that Bruins longtime owner Jeremy Jacobs was handing ownership of the Original Six hockey club over to his six children, both Jacobs and his son Charlie Jacobs assured that there would be no change to the current power structure at the top of the B’s organization.

Jacobs will still remain the powerful Chairman of the NHL Board of Governors and Charlie will still be the principal ownership presence day-to-day in Boston while spending four days a week working at TD Garden. So it’s business as usual.

“I believe he had a vision long ago about trying to keep our family business just that, a family business, and continue with myself and my siblings in professional management roles,” said Charlie Jacobs. “This has been a journey; this has been a long time. I do have two siblings that work out of our corporate headquarters in Buffalo.

“I spend a day a week in Buffalo and have for many years. I work Mondays out of there, and I come and start my work week here on Tuesdays. But as for a decision-making process, most of our decisions are collaborative, unless of course our chairman has a thought. [Then] we do what he tells us to do.”

There may have been some speculation that Jacobs' retirement from the NHL Board of Governors could be forthcoming given that he was signing things over to his kids. But the 79-year-old confirmed to NBC Sports Boston on Tuesday that he plans on continuing in his current role overseeing the league, and that “the business of hockey” is one of the things that provides him with great joy at this point in his life.

“It’s up to them more than me. I enjoy it. I enjoy the business of hockey and I’m happy to be involved where I can contribute,” said Jacobs, following his press conference with Bruins management at B’s media day. “At some point I’m getting to the age where a younger mind might serve them better, but it’s up to them to decide. I don’t see it as a lot of work or difficult for me. I still the interaction around it.

“I enjoy the game itself, of course, but I really enjoy the business of the game. I enjoy the interaction with [NHL] commissioner [Gary Bettman]. When we went through labor unrest it was great working with all of those people together. You’ve got to recognize that it’s a competitive league and you maintain those relationships on a competitive basis. That’s important. I like that about hockey and I like about the labor agreement that we’re all working with the same dollars.”

Long after he does retire, of course, Jacobs will be remembered as one of the hard-line owners that got the salary cap instituted following the loss of the 2004-05 NHL season, a move that has in part allowed for the overall health and well-being of the National Hockey League at this point. But there’s no reason to write those retirement stories quiet yet for Jacobs as it doesn’t sound he’s going anywhere else anytime soon.

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Report: Jeremy Jacobs hands over Bruins franchise to his six children

Report: Jeremy Jacobs hands over Bruins franchise to his six children

There really hasn’t been a change in Boston Bruins ownership in 44 years since Jeremy Jacobs purchased the Original Six team.

But that’s about to change, though it’s not a seismic ownership change to be sure. The 79-year-old Jacobs is passing on the ownership of his NHL franchise to his six children, according to a report from the Boston Globe. The transaction already took place earlier this season and the B’s franchise is running as business as usual in the aftermath.

Jacobs has three sons (Jerry Jr, Lou and Charlie) and three daughters (Lisann, Lynn and Katie) that are expected to keep the Jacobs family name as the ownership of the Bruins for the long haul. Charlie Jacobs has essentially been the day-to-day ownership presence for Delaware North for some time now in Boston, and that is likely to continue with younger Jacobs now as the representative on the NHL’s Board of Governors.

“I have given it to my kids,” said Jacobs to the Boston Globe. “They are paying me some of the proceeds that come out of this. It happened this year. This was done on the basis that the longevity is going to continue in the hands of the Jacobs children, and the next generation will have it. Hopefully it will continue to be a successful franchise.”

In the last decade plus, Jacobs has taken a fairly hands-off approach to the Bruins franchise, with Bruins president Cam Neely given ample room to operate both the business and hockey sides of the Black and Gold. That’s expected to continue even with the franchise handed off to Jacobs’ progeny and the Bruins in excellent shape hockey-wise coming off a Stanley Cup Final appearance and three straight playoff seasons.

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Jeremy Jacobs credits Bruins on 'outstanding' season: 'I'm very proud of them'

Jeremy Jacobs credits Bruins on 'outstanding' season: 'I'm very proud of them'

BOSTON – The Bruins clearly didn’t reach their ultimate goal of lifting the Stanley Cup when the NHL postseason concluded last week. The Game 7 loss is one that’s going to sting for Bruins fans for a long time to come, and it will certainly stick with the members of the team and organization as well.

Interestingly enough, Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs was able to push through the heartbreak and the lament, and saw the positives of a season where the B’s made the playoffs for the third straight year and made it all the way to the final possible game of the Stanley Cup Playoffs.

“I thought we were more evolving, and we showed more maturity and development than I thought we had gotten to. It may have been circumstances and conditions that got us there [to the Stanley Cup Final], but it was an outstanding season,” said Jacobs. “I think it says a lot about our men, and about our coaching. It was an impressive [season]. There wasn’t a person around the league that didn’t say to me that they admired the way this team was built. I’m very proud of them.”

To get those kinds of complimentary words from a Bruins owner that’s notorious for not pulling punches when they are warranted? That is a worthy accomplishment of a Black and Gold group that excelled all year.  

There’s no doubting that the Bruins deserve plenty of credit for getting to the Stanley Cup Final regardless of their path to getting there, and the invaluable experience gained by their young players suiting up for 24 postseason games during an epic run of ups and downs throughout the postseason.

Certainly it was a rousing success from a Bruins ownership perspective with every single regular-season game sold out, 13 home playoff games played on the TD Garden ice through Boston’s playoff run and even 16,000-plus showing up for an evening scrimmage during an 11-day layoff prior to the Stanley Cup Final.

But it just doesn’t feel quite “outstanding” when the season ended with the St. Louis Blues celebrating on the TD Garden ice a week ago, just as it didn’t feel quite so outstanding when the Blackhawks celebrated on the Garden ice six years ago as well.

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