Marty Walsh

Boston mayor Marty Walsh sends letter congratulating Blues superfan Laila Anderson on Cup win

Boston mayor Marty Walsh sends letter congratulating Blues superfan Laila Anderson on Cup win

The Boston Bruins weren't able to dispatch the St. Louis Blues in the 2019 Stanley Cup Final. The series went seven games and despite having home-ice advantage, the Bruins fell in Game 7 by a final score of 4-1.

The championship was the Blues' first in franchise history and the 2019 Cup Final was their first appearance in the championship in 49 years. So, needless to say, winning the championship was a big deal for the city. And, it certainly was for superfan Laila Anderson as well.

Anderson, 11, suffers from a life-threatening autoimmune disease and drew the attention of the Blues during their championship run. She was at Game 7 and was also involved in the team's championship parade. And recently, she received a letter congratulating her on the Blues' win. That letter came from Boston mayor Marty Walsh.

Here's a look at the letter, per the NHL on NBC Twitter account.

This is a very decent gesture by Walsh. Anderson was certainly an inspiration for all during the Stanley Cup coverage, and even though the Bruins couldn't win, seeing her celebrate with the Blues certainly was a silver lining for Bruins -- and hockey -- fans everywhere. 

And as Walsh mentioned, Boston has had plenty of success with championships lately. So, while the Bruins' recent loss was a tough one, Boston still has plenty to be proud of and a couple of championship trophies to defend.

Bruins, Blues near the top of Joe Haggerty's NHL Power Rankings>>>

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No prop bet? Kansas City mayor says Marty Walsh is ducking

No prop bet? Kansas City mayor says Marty Walsh is ducking

We've been having some trouble arranging prop bets lately here in Boston.

First, it was Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker firing up the crowd at last fall's World Series victory parade and announcing that California Governor Jerry Brown "never got back to us" about a prop bet, perhaps because "Maybe they knew what was going to happen."

Now, it seems Kansas City Mayor Sly James -- no stranger to the friendly poilitican's prop bet, between the recent championship runs for the Kansas City Royals and Sporting KC -- is having trouble getting a return volley from Boston Mayor Marty Walsh ahead of Sunday's AFC Championship Game between the Patriots and Chiefs at Arrowhead Stadium.

Any sort of BBQ-for-chowder arrangement won't be coming from the Mayor's office, James told reporters at a press conference Thursday, claiming, "Marty doesn't bet on games because every time Marty makes a bet they lose."

"So I tried to talk Marty into making another bet," he continued. "He wouldn't do it."

After assuming office in January 2014, Walsh indeed lost his first two prop bets with other Mayors -- the 2014 AFC Championship won by the Denver Broncos, and a Stanley Cup Playoff series between the bitter rivals Boston Bruins and Monteal Canadiens. He hasn't made one since.

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Beyond the Jones incident, it’s time to confront racism in Boston

Beyond the Jones incident, it’s time to confront racism in Boston

“Boston is a racist city.”

That statement is often met with contempt by natives of “the Hub” and understandably so.

Why would one accept the fact that their home city was synonymous with racism in the Northeast? This would mean they’d also accept their own underlying prejudices rooted not only in their personal upbringing but based on a history that continues to promote the separation of the races and cultures it claims to embrace.

Better yet, maybe they’d have to face their former classmates who were bused miles away from home to “fix” this infamous segregation problem.

We get it.

What’s in the past should stay there, right?

It’s 2017, so racism in any form no longer exists.

Wrong.

For years this uncomfortable topic has been pushed to the back burner, slowly simmering, unattended, until another incident boils over. reminding everyone of the scalding-hot truth.

Monday night was one of those cases. Orioles center fielder Adam Jones told USA Today that he was the subject of racially charged language during a game at Fenway Park.

“A disrespectful fan threw a bag of peanuts at me.” He explained. "I was called the N-word a handful of times tonight. Thanks. Pretty awesome.'' 

Red Sox team president Sam Kennedy issued a public apology Tuesday morning, saying, in part: “No player should have an object thrown at him on the playing field, nor be subjected to any kind of racism at Fenway Park. The Red Sox have zero tolerance for such inexcusable behavior, and our entire organization and our fans are sickened by the conduct of an ignorant few.” 

"This is unacceptable and not who we are as a city." Boston Mayor Marty Walsh told WBUR. "These words and actions have no place in Fenway, Boston or anywhere. We are better than this."

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker tweeted similar sentiments

Somewhere in Boston, when the weather gets nice, and there isn’t must to talk about on Boston sports radio (or a certain basketball team is trying to recruit a certain free agent) the question reemerges. The problem then becomes, of all the media members to speak on the subject, how many of them are actually people of color and have experienced this “said racism”? 

The reality is, one will not recognize, understand, acknowledge or even address racism, or even the everyday microaggressions people of color experience, if you are not willing to accept its existence. What happened to Adam Jones was disgusting but the bigger issue at hand were the fans who observed it happening and sat mute.

Our worldview is based on the people we grew up with and took the time to try and understand. There’s nothing wrong with embracing where you come from, but when David Ortiz, Jackie Bradley Jr. and Mookie Betts are the only black people you “know”, then comes the time to reevaluate the bubble you live in.

To be ‘racist’ in 2017 does not necessarily equate with white pointed hoodies and lynchings.

Conversations on race are fleeting. Everyone holds hands and sings Kumbaya at their local town hall meeting on “race relations” and by next week everyone forgets what happened.

Until the Bostonians are able to take an objective look back and understand the root of their problems, outsiders will continue to proclaim, “Boston is a racist city” and they won’t be far from the truth.