New York Yankees

Johnny Damon explains his emotions during both Game 7 HRs vs. Yankees in 2004

Johnny Damon explains his emotions during both Game 7 HRs vs. Yankees in 2004

Boston Red Sox outfielder Johnny Damon's grand slam against the New York Yankees in Game 7 of the 2004 American League Championship Series at Yankee Stadium was the biggest hit of his MLB career, but he didn't show a ton of emotion rounding the bases or after crossing home plate.

There's a good reason for that, though.

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The Red Sox had a 6-0 lead in the second inning, but Damon was well aware that celebrating too early was a mistake. He was on the Red Sox squad that lost a heartbreaker in Game 7 of the ALCS at Yankee Stadium the previous year. Damon wasn't going to get all excited until the final out was recorded.

"(That) has everything to do with it," Damon said on Barstool Sports' "Section 10" Red Sox podcast. "I mean, 6-0 against the Yankees at Yankee Stadium, it's never safe. And I'm not that big rah-rah guy. I was taught to pretend like you've been there before. Unfortunately, some players don't have that same mentality. They're (excited) about a bloop single. But I respect the game too much. I know if there's winner, that there's a person who lost, so I always respected the game that way."

Damon did admit he "was a little bit happier after the 2-run homer, for sure." He also admitted he felt "a little more relief" rounding the bases following his second homer, which gave Boston an 8-1 lead in the fourth inning.

Check out Damon's demeanor on both home runs in the video below:

The Red Sox eventually won 10-3 to become the first MLB team to win a Best-of-7 series after trailing it 3-0. The Red Sox went on to sweep the St. Louis Cardinals and win their first World Series championship since 1918.

Red Sox fans will enjoy Alex Rodriguez re-living Yankees' 2004 ALCS collapse

Red Sox fans will enjoy Alex Rodriguez re-living Yankees' 2004 ALCS collapse

Re-watching classic major league games can be fun -- unless you're Alex Rodriguez and it's Tuesday night.

With Major League Baseball still on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic, ESPN dug up another gem from the archives Tuesday: Game 4 of the 2004 American League Championship Series between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees.

Red Sox fans hardly need a refresher on that one: Dave Roberts' steal and Bill Mueller's RBI single tied the game in the ninth inning, and David Ortiz's walk-off home run won it in the 12th to keep the Sox alive.

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Rodriguez, the Yankees' third baseman in that game, decided to torture himself by tuning into the rebroadcast. Here's how that went:

"I'm still losing sleep over this," A-Rod laments. "See this gray hair? That's because of the Boston Red Sox."

Add "giving Alex Rodriguez gray hair" to the list of the 2004 Red Sox's accomplishments.

A-Rod wasn't done bemoaning New York's collapse, which unfolded over four days in October 2004 as Boston erased a 3-0 series lead to win in seven games and set up their first World Series title in 86 years.

What made the Yankees' collapse especially painful for Rodriguez was that he easily could have been in the other dugout: The Red Sox had a trade in place to land A-Rod from the Texas Rangers in 2003 that fell through at the last second.

Rodriguez became a hated villain in the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry, though, so Boston fans will have no problem participating in some schadenfreude as A-Rod opens up old wounds.

With Derek Jeter's Hall induction postponed, could he be joined by Curt Schilling in 2021?

With Derek Jeter's Hall induction postponed, could he be joined by Curt Schilling in 2021?

Could Derek Jeter share the stage in Cooperstown next summer with a couple of Red Sox pitching legends?

The Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies for this July for the Class of 2020, including Jeter, Larry Walker and the late Boston Globe writer Nick Cafardo, have been postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Instead, the Hall's ceremony next summer, on July 25, 2021, will feature 2020 and 2021 inductees. Red Sox pitching greats Curt Schilling and Roger Clemens, who's also a former teammate of Jeter's with the Yankees, have been moving closer to election the past few years. Schilling was at 70 percent of the vote from the Baseball Writers Association of America this year (75 percent is needed to make the Hall). It'll be his ninth year on the ballot and next-to-last chance to get in via the BBWAA vote.

The New York Post is already worried about Schilling spoiling the party, hence its headline: "Derek Jeter's Hall of Fame nod could come with painful Red Sox company." 

Clemens, like Schilling, faces his next-to-last chance with BBWAA voters in 2021. He's a longer shot given his ties to performance-enhancing drugs. He did manage to collect 61 percent of the vote this year. Another PED-connected candidate, Barry Bonds, was at 60.7 percent this year.

Schilling's and Clemens' chances could be enhanced by the fact there's no marquee first-time-eligible Hall candidate in 2021. Mark Buehrle, Tim Hudson, Torii Hunter and Jason Giambi are the most notable among that group. 

So, there is an outside chance that Jeter, the legendary Yankees shortstop and five-time champion who was expected to draw a record crowd of 70,000 to Cooperstown, could be joined by Schilling, a member of the Yankees' long-time rivals, next summer, as well as a former teammate and Sox pitcher in Clemens. 

By the way, Jeter hit .346 lifetime (15-for-44) vs. Schilling with one home run and six RBIs, but Schilling got the best of the Yankees and Jeter in the 2001 World Series with the Arizona Diamondbacks and, of course, in the 2004 ALCS.

Think he'd wear his bloody sock to the ceremony?