Source: Tom Brady would 'never do anything to disparage' Robert Kraft

Source: Tom Brady would 'never do anything to disparage' Robert Kraft

FOXBORO – Since Tom Brady’s eye-opening cameo in Paul Rudd’s “Living With Yourself” appeared Friday night, speculation flew that Brady being shown exiting a “Top Happy Spa” may have been a dig at Patriots owner Robert Kraft’s ongoing legal travails.

A source close to Brady on Saturday morning said that was absolutely not the aim.

The “relationship with [Robert Kraft] has been, is and will always be great,” the source maintained, adding that Brady “would never do anything to disparage him. EVER.”

Brady and Kraft “have spent 20 incredible years together,” the source continued. “The cameo was done as a favor, was agreed to a year ago, was written four years ago, was a parody on cloning genes in a laboratory and was filmed on a green screen.”

A source also told Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk that Brady “didn’t realize that the scene would be a direct or indirect reference to the ongoing legal entanglements of Patriots owner Robert Kraft.” 

The show’s creator, Timothy Greenberg, said at a press junket that filming of Brady’s scene came after the season and Kraft’s being charged for soliciting in Florida. Greenberg was concerned that would cause Brady to pull out of the project.

Greenberg obviously expected the public to make the link it has. Otherwise, he wouldn’t have had trepidation that Brady might bail.

He didn’t and that’s great news for him, Rudd and the people at Netflix who are all enjoying the bump Brady’s presence can bring to a project.

Brady, though, might be wondering if the bump was worth the headache.

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Goodell: No NFL discipline of Kraft until court case resolved

Goodell: No NFL discipline of Kraft until court case resolved

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell told reporters at the league's spring meetings on Wednesday that the NFL will take no disciplinary action against Robert Kraft until the Patriots owner's solicitation of prostitution case is resolved.

Also Wednesday, Judge Leonard Hanser indefinitely postponed Kraft's trial until the appeal by prosecutors of Hanser's decision to suppress the use of video evidence obtained at the Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida. Police say those videos show Kraft paying for sex when he the spa twice in a 24-hour period in January.

Kraft issued a public apology after the arrest and has pleaded not guilty to two misdemeanor counts of solicitation.

The appeal over the videos won't be heard until at least Sept. 4. The Patriots open their season Sept. 8 against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Gillette Stadium, meaning Kraft will likely still be waiting for the resolution of his court case and any discipline from the NFL when the team's sixth Super Bowl championship banner is raised in a ceremony before that "Sunday Night Football" opener.

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Florida prosecutors to appeal suppression of Kraft video

Florida prosecutors to appeal suppression of Kraft video

Florida prosecutors haven't given up their fight to allow video evidence to be used in Patriots Robert Kraft's solicitation of prostitution case. 

As expected, The Palm Beach County State Attorney filed an appeal Friday of a judge's ruling earlier this week suppressing the video evidence because police did not properly monitor the video at the Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida.

The appeal was first reported by T.J. Quinn of ESPN.

If the appeal is denied, it would effectively end the state's case against Kraft, who is accused of visiting the spa to receive sex for money twice in a two-day period in January.

Prosecutors opened themselves up for civil suits from Kraft and 24 other defendants in the solicitation sting if they failed to appeal. 
 
In his ruling, Judge Leonard Hanser agreed with Kraft's attorneys who argued that police failed to properly minimize the video surveillance of the spa - i.e., that they didn't avoid recording legal activity inside Orchids of Asia, and that clients, including Kraft, have a right to privacy inside the spa.

Kraft attorney Burck told Quinn: "[Palm Beach County State Attorney David] Aronberg is acknowledging he has no case without the illegal video recordings that four Florida judges have now found to be unconstitutional. No evidence means no trial. So the State had only two options -- drop the case or appeal. They chose to appeal, but we are confident the appellate court will agree with Judge Hanser and the other judges who threw out their illegally obtained evidence."

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