White Sox

5 Questions with...Chicago Tribune's Phil Hersh

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5 Questions with...Chicago Tribune's Phil Hersh

By Jeff Nuich

CSN Chicago Senior Director of CommunicationsCSNChicago.com Contributor

January 6, 2010

Want to know more about your favorite Chicago media celebrities? CSNChicago.com has your fix as we put the citys most popular personalities on the spot with everyones favorite weekly local celeb feature entitled 5 Questions with...

Every Wednesday exclusively on CSNChicago.com, its our turn to grill the local media and other local VIPs with five random sports and non-sports related questions that will definitely be of interest to old and new fans alike.

This weekone of the most respected international sports writers in the country whose insight and detailed coverage of the Olympic Games is second to nonehell soon be making his trek to Vancouver to cover the Winter Games for the Chicago Tribune and the Tribune family of newspapershere are 5 Questions withPHIL HERSH!

BIO: Philip Hersh grew up in Boston but has lived in Evanston since 1977. He has worked at the Chicago Tribune since 1984 and has focused on international sports and the Olympics since 1987. For the past 10 years, the German sports publication, Sport Intern, has named Hersh among the 100 most influential people in world sports. He was graduated from Yale University with a B.A. in French and a specialization in early 19th Century French literature. Prior to joining the Tribune (prior seems like the early 19th Century), Hersh worked for the Gloucester, Mass., Daily Times, the Baltimore Evening Sun, the Chicago Daily News and the Chicago Sun-Times. His wife, Ann Roberts, is a professor of the History of Art at Lake Forest College. They have one child.

1) CSNChicago.com: Phil, with the 2010 Winter Olympic Games coming up in a few short weeks in Vancouver, what events are you most looking forward to covering and do you see the United States making a big overall statement in final medal count when its all said and done?

Hersh: My primary responsibility will be figure skating, where the men's event shapes up as the most interesting, especially for Chicago readers, since Evan Lysacek of Naperville is the reigning world champion. There is a good possibility there will be 4 men with world titles in the event now that 2006 Olympic champion Evgeni Plushenko has returned to competition after a three-year absence and two-time world champion Stephane Lambiel is back after a one-year absence. Based on strong showings at last year's world championships and World Cup this year, the U.S. team overall could easily better its performance from the 2006 Olympics. Alpine skier Lindsey Vonn is being billed as a winter Michael Phelps, but the vagaries of skiing (changing conditions, risk of in jury) are such that Vonn would do well to win one gold medal, even if she is favored in downhill and Super-G. (There are no five foot waves hitting one swimmer, but 30-mile-per-hour wind gusts could hit just one skier).

2) CSNChicago.com: Chicago-born speedskater Shani Davis will no doubt receive a boat load of media coverage at the Winter Games and millions of fans will be glued to the set to watch this brilliant athlete make his mark in Vancouver. Will anything short of at least two Davis gold medals be a disappointment for the U.S. and, a quick follow-up question, do you think Davis was out of line for calling comedian Stephen Colbert a jerk for the Comedy Central hosts tongue-in-cheek criticism of Canadians, even though Colbert helped raise over 250K for the U.S. Speedskating team?

Hersh: If this event were in Salt Lake City or Calgary, where the ice is fastest because of both altitude and superior ice-making, you could bet the farm on Davis winning the 1,000 and 1,500. But the sea-level rink in Vancouver is a bit of an equalizer, making results less predictable. Look for Shani to win at least one gold and one other individual medal; and this time, there should be no controversy about his decision not to skate team pursuit, as U.S. Speedskating officials have made it public well in advance rather than leaving him to twist in the wind, as was the case at the 2006 Winter Games.

As far as the Colbert issue, nothing Shani does surprises me. He generally goes his own way. And, as I noted in a Blog last month, I think the "jerk'' remark had more to do with a Colbert skit during the 2006 Olympics than anything recent.

3) CSNChicago.com: What are your thoughts on allowing NBA and NHL professional athletes to participate in the Olympics?

Hersh: The addition of pro basketball players to the Olympics has done more to improve the game worldwide than anything else in the sport's history. The 1992 Dream Team not only gave the world a chance to watch many of the game's greatest players in history pound the opposition, but gave players around the globe a level of excellence to aspire to. The result: U.S. pros did not win the Athens Olympics and have earned no better than bronze in the past three world championships. As for the NHL: ask most NHL players, and they will be gung-ho to play in the Olympics. The only thing that disappoints me about the upcoming Olympic tournament is that, for the first time since the NHL has taken part, it will take place on an NHL-sized rink rather than the longer, wider Olympic-sized rink. The beauty of the recent tournaments was seeing the speed and passing skills pros could display when clutch-and-grab tactics weren't as easy to execute. Hopefully, the emphasis in the NHL on having a more flowing, freewheeling game will carry over to the Olympics.
4) CSNChicago.com: Name the top three Olympic moments youve personally covered that you will fondly remember years from now?

Hersh: Number One is what I did during the Opening Ceremony of the 1984 Winter Games in Sarajevo -- particularly because of the horror that would befall that city a few years later.

In 1984 -- before cell phones, before Internet -- Sarajevo was a very exotic, remote place. It will be remembered as the last Olympics held in a place there was a true sense of uniqueness in a world becoming more and more homogenized.

In my mind's eye, I try to see the Sarajevo of Feb. 8, 1984, when a light snow was falling in the ancient marketplace downtown, a place where cultures and centuries blended into a harmonious flow. The opening ceremonies were underway across town, and I chose to spend those hours wandering the snowy stillness of the souk.

The snowflakes flickered in the streetlights, and TV sets flickered through the windows of every shop in the market. Time blurred, centuries running together in what seemed a harmonious flow. Sarajevo, then known only as the unfortunate locale where an Archduke's assassination touched off World War I, was suddenly the cynosure of the world's eyes for much happier reasons.

The transcendent image was of a city at peace with itself and the world that had come to visit for the next 15 days. Each of us would leave with a story or several about the kindness of a new Sarajevan friend-the person going in an opposite direction who turned to pick up someone waiting for a bus that was very late, the woman in the pizza parlor who joked that the picture of ice cream on her shop window was "communist propaganda," the stranger who hugged you during the awards ceremony for alpine skier Jure Franko, Yugoslavia's lone Olympic medalist in 1984.

Number Two occurred during the track competition at the Barcelona Olympics. This is how I described it in my Tribune story:

In the Olympic preoccupation with winners and losers, in the mania for counting medals, it is easy to forget what really constitutes triumph.

Derek Redmond of Great Britain showed what it was Monday night, in an exhibition that was both excruciating and exhilarating to watch.

He limped and hobbled around the final half of the Olympic Stadium track. Redmond's face was contorted with pain and tears, but he was determined to finish a semifinal heat of the 400 meters even though his chances for a medal had disappeared with the pop in his right hamstring that left him sprawled on the track.

The sight of his son's distress was too much for Jim Redmond, who had been sitting near the top row of a stadium packed with 65,000 people. He rushed down flights and flights of stairs and blew past security people who challenged his lack of the appropriate credential to be on the track.

"I wasn't interested in what they were saying," Jim Redmond said. "I don't speak any Spanish, and you don't need a credential in emergencies."

Jim Redmond, 49, is a big man who was wearing a T-shirt that read, "Have you hugged your foot today?" He caught up to his son at the top of the final curve, some 120 meters from the finish. He put one arm around Derek's waist, another around his left wrist.

"At first I didn't realize it was him," Derek said. "Then he shouted my name, and I recognized his voice. It must have been hard for him."

They moved in tandem for a few meters until Derek Redmond stopped and threw his arms around his father's shoulders and sobbed. Then they started again, doing a three-legged wobble toward the finish.

Jim Redmond let his son go for the last few steps so he could cross the finish alone. Then he threw his arms around Derek again.

Number Three was watching Muhammad Ali light the cauldron at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta:

He appeared out of the night, out of the past he shared with both the event and the region. When the light caught his dark face, caught it full, the reflection was brighter than the flame Janet Evans handed to him. It was a reflection of the possibilities the Olympics promise and rarely deliver, the possibilities for men and women to be judged by who they are and not how they look.

Muhammad Ali, the final torch bearer at the Opening Ceremony, up there on what seemed a mountaintop, the celestial mountaintop of equality that Atlanta native Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had preached about climbing. The boxer who had won Olympic gold in 1960, then threw his medal in the Ohio River after being refused service in an all-white restaurant. The man who represented the racial and social polarization of the 1960s and early 1970s when he took a Muslim name and said he didn't have anything against "them Viet Cong."

Ali, the world's best-known sports figure of the last 50 years. Ali, showing 3 billion telespectators worldwide that his nation, his native South, can rise above itself in the heat of a steamy Georgia summer night. Ali, 54, his face smooth and young and his arm wobbling from a disease of age, summing up the Olympic Century. It was the greatest.

5) CSNChicago.com: With your years of traveling the globe covering the Olympics and numerous other international sporting events for the Tribune, how many total frequent flyer miles do you think youve racked up so far?

Hersh: I've flown 1.5 million miles on United since joining Mileage Plus in 1983, plus another 300,000 or so on other airlines. Baseball writers probably more miles, but they haven't been to the places I have. Check out my most memorable trips in this Blog entry: http:newsblogs.chicagotribune.comsports_globetrotting200912my-favorite-p...

BONUS QUESTIONCSNChicago.com: Anything you want to promote Phil? Tell us, CSNChicago.com readers want to hear about it

Hersh: Follow me on my Blog, Globetrotting: http:newsblogs.chicagotribune.comsports_globetrotting and on Twitter: twitter.comolyphil

Hersh LINKS:

Chicago TribunePhil Hershs Globetrotting blog

Chicago TribunePhil Hersh International Sports columns

Phil Hersh on Facebook

Phil Hersh on Twitter

Eloy Jimenez returns to White Sox a little more than three weeks after spraining ankle

Eloy Jimenez returns to White Sox a little more than three weeks after spraining ankle

Things looked grim when Eloy Jimenez, the White Sox top-ranked prospect and a centerpiece of the South Side rebuilding plans, was down in pain on the warning track.

But a little more than three weeks later, Jimenez is back in the lineup, returned from his stay on the injured list for the start of a four-game series against the Houston Astros.

Jimenez made a leaping attempt to catch a home-run ball in the April 26 game against the Detroit Tigers. In the process, his foot got stuck in the padding of the left-field wall, and the 22-year-old suffered a high ankle sprain. He limped off the field and needed help getting into the dugout and clubhouse. Thoughts of "here we go again" flashed through a fan base that's watched top prospects suffer one significant injury after another in recent seasons.

The White Sox said Jimenez would be reevaluated in a couple weeks, while cursory Google searches revealed recovery times of more than a month for this type of injury.

But Jimenez seems to have healed quickly. He went on a minor league rehab assignment last week, playing in five games with Triple-A Charlotte before being deemed ready to return Monday.

This is phenomenal news for the White Sox and their fans, of course, who in the time Jimenez has been sidelined have seen another key piece go down with Carlos Rodon's Tommy John surgery. Jimenez hasn't got off to the rip-roaring start some predicted — he's slashed .241/.294/.380 with a trio of home runs in his first 21 major league games — but all playing time for the youngster is good playing time as he continues his development in his first big league season. Throw in Jimenez's four-game stay on the bereavement list prior to that game against Detroit, and he's had just one at-bat since April 21.

So maybe expect some rust, and manager Rick Renteria said Jimenez could perhaps be eased back with a game at DH here and there as he continues to work on improving his defense in left field.

Jimenez did go 7-for-22 (a .318 batting average) with a homer and a double in his rehab stint in Charlotte. Now he's back in the major league outfield, a good thing for everyone following along with this rebuild.

Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the White Sox easily on your device.

NBC Sports Chicago launches Outside the Ivy, interactive Cubs show by fans

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NBC Sports Chicago

NBC Sports Chicago launches Outside the Ivy, interactive Cubs show by fans

Chicago, IL (May 20, 2019) – Following the launch of its first fan-hosted/fan-interactive postgame program, “Bulls Outsiders,” NBC Sports Chicago – THE Home of the #AuthenticFan – has announced it will debut Outside the Ivy presented by Supercuts, a brand new, half-hour, live, multi-platform, viewer-interactive Cubs postgame show that will provide viewers with the hottest takes and spirited commentary from the fans' perspective. 

Hosted by three, die-hard Cubs enthusiasts – Michael Cerami (@Michael_Cerami), Danny Rockett (@SonRanto), and Luis Medina (@lcm1986), Outside the Ivy will make its network debut following NBC Sports Chicago’s telecast of the Cubs vs. Philadelphia Phillies game on Wednesday, May 22 (approx. 10:30 PM CT).  The show will air immediately following Cubs Postgame Live presented by BlueCross BlueShield of Illinois on NBC Sports Chicago, via live stream to authenticated NBC Sports Chicago subscribers at NBCSportsChicago.com/WatchLive, through social media on Facebook Live (Facebook.com/NBCSChicago), and via the new “MyTeams by NBC Sports” app (Fans located anywhere in the U.S. can download MyTeams for free on iOS and Android devices in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store). 

Throughout the season, NBC Sports Chicago’s cross-platform presentation of Outside the Ivy will air immediately following Cubs Postgame Live on nights the network carries a 7:00 PM start time Cubs telecast (approx. 10:30 PM), along with a few select 6:00 PM game time starts, plus – fans can also look forward to additional special editions of Outside the Ivy for the Cubs-White Sox “Crosstown” series, All-Star break, MLB trade deadline, and a season-end recap among others.  

In addition to the lively post-game discussion with the show’s hosts, Outside the Ivy will also emphasize heavy viewer interaction via fan engagement on a number of the network’s social media platforms including Twitter (@NBCSCubs; fans urged to utilize the Twitter hashtag #OutsidetheIvy in their posts) and Facebook Live (Facebook.com/NBCSChicago), which will enable Cubs fans to directly interact with the show’s hosts (and each other) with comments and questions pertaining to that particular evening’s game, the key topics of the night, or anything else they want to discuss from a league-wide MLB perspective. 

In preparation for the hiring of the program’s three primary hosts, NBC Sports Chicago reached out to numerous notable local (and vocal) die-hard Cubs fans who stood out among the vast Cubs social media community. Candidates who responded back with interest were simply asked to shoot a 90-second video on their phone and offer up their take on a recent Cubs topic of interest.  From there, over 30 top candidates were narrowed down to nine, who were then all brought in for in-studio auditions. Following the lengthy on-camera process, Director of Studio Content John Schippman and Multi-Platform Director Michael Allardyce finalized their decision and welcomed Cerami, Rockett, and Medina to the NBC Sports Chicago family.  

Please note the following Outside the Ivy host bios:

Michael Cerami Chicago Cubs blogger for “Bleacher Nation”

Age: 27
Hometown: Schaumburg, IL
Favorite Cubs player of all time: Starlin Castro
Favorite current Cub: Anthony Rizzo 
Favorite Cubs moment: “When Javier Báez stole home in the 2016 NLCS!”

Danny RockettHost of the Son Ranto Podcast, Front man for ‘The Bleacher Bum Band,’ and blogger for SB Nation’s ‘Bleed Cubbie Blue’

Age: 44
Hometown: Arlington Heights, IL                            
Favorite Cubs player of all-time: Andre Dawson
Favorite current Cub: “Javy Báez, but Willson Contreras is a real close second. I love catchers.”
Favorite Cubs moment: “It has to be World Series Game 7, right? I went to that game in Cleveland, just an amazing night on so many levels.”

Luis MedinaCubs blogger for “Bleacher Nation”

Age: 31
Hometown: Chicago, IL                            
Favorite Cubs player of all-time: Sammy Sosa
Favorite current Cub: Javy Báez
Favorite Cubs moment: “World Series Game 5. I was at the game and got to see the Cubs win a World Series game at Wrigley Field.”

PROGRAMING NOTE:  NBC Sports Chicago’s next Cubs telecast takes place TONIGHT as the northsiders host Bryce Harper and the Philadelphia Phillies, featuring the highly-anticipated starting pitching showdown between the Cubs YU DARVISH against former Cubs standout/2015 NL Cy Young award winner JAKE ARRIETA.  Live coverage gets underway with Baseball Night in Chicago at 6:30 PM with game coverage starting at 7:00 PM.  This game will also stream live on NBCSportsChicago.com and on the “MyTeams by NBC Sports” app. 

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Click here to download the new MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream Cubs games easily on your device.