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5 Questions with...Rowdy Gaines

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5 Questions with...Rowdy Gaines

CSN Chicago Senior Director of Communications
CSNChicago.com Contributor

Want to know more about your favorite Chicago media celebrities? CSNChicago.com has your fix as we put the city's most popular personalities on the spot with everyone's favorite local celeb feature entitled 5 Questions with...

On Wednesdays, exclusively on CSNChicago.com, its our turn to grill the local media and other local VIPs with five random sports and non-sports related questions that will definitely be of interest to old and new fans alike.

This weeks special guest ... one of the greatest U.S. Olympians ever, whose athletic skills and dedication to winning propelled him to set multiple swimming world records in the 1980sviewers will be seeing plenty of him during the upcoming Summer Olympic Games in London, as he is the primary swimming and open water analyst for NBC Sports over 5,500 hours of total Olympics coverage via its television and digital outlets ... a great athlete (with Chicago ties no less!), but an even better person for everything he does in the charitable community, here are 5 Questions with ... ROWDY GAINES!

BIO: One of the worlds fastest swimmers in the 1980s, Ambrose Rowdy Gaines IV now ranks as the most experienced television analyst in the sport. At the 2012 Olympic Summer Games in London, Gaines will serve as an analyst for swimming and open water. He has been NBCs Olympic swimming analyst since the 1996 Atlanta Games.

Gaines set world records in the 100-meter freestyle in 1981, the 200-meter freestyle in 1982 and capped off his phenomenal career by winning three gold medals for the United States at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. After entering the 1984 Olympic trials as a past his prime long-shot to make the team, he set an Olympic record in the 100-meter freestyle, and helped establish a world record by anchoring the 4100-meter freestyle relay team. He completed the gold-medal triple by swimming the freestyle anchor of the 4100-meter medley, again setting Olympic and world records. Gaines also was a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic Team, which did not compete in Moscow because of the U.S. boycott.

After retiring, Gaines turned to broadcasting, and will be calling his sixth Olympic Games as the expert analyst of swimming for NBC's broadcast of the Olympic Games in London this year.

Named the World Swimmer of the Year in 1981, Gaines was an eight-time NCAA champion at Auburn University and was honored as the Southeastern Conferences Athlete of the Year in 1981. He is a member of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame and later served as the Hall's Executive Director. Gaines also served as the Chief Fundraising and Alumni Officer at USA Swimming, the national governing body for the sport in the U.S.

In addition to parenting and broadcasting, Gaines volunteers for the United Cerebral Palsy Foundation. He also is on the Board of Directors of Swim Across America, an organization designed to raise funds for cancer research.

Gaines is the Executive Director of Rowdy's Kidz, a wellness initiative developed and supported by The Limu Company that reaches out to children across the country.

Gaines and his wife, Judy, reside in Lake Mary, Fla., with their four daughters.

1) CSNChicago.com: Rowdy, it's a great honor having you in the spotlight for this special edition of CSNChicago.coms 5 Questions with ... As one of the greatest Olympic athletes in U.S. history, along with being the lead analyst for NBC Sports 2012 London Summer Games swimming and open-water coverage, let's start off with this one: In your opinion, how has your sport changed in terms of athlete preparation/training over the years since your record-setting performances during in the 1980s?

Gaines: Thank you Comcast SportsNet Chicago! I have a lot of roots in Chi-Town! My father lived there for 25 years and sister is still there, so it's my second home.

Swimming has changed dramatically since I retired in 1984. Diet is a big one of course, but also the training now is much more specific to the event and stroke you swim. There is a lot more testing done to help the athletes monitor their training routine, but the biggest change of all has been money. The athlete can now make a living swimming where in 1984 you couldn't. In fact, when I won in 1984, I became the fourth-oldest swimmer in history to win a gold medal at 25 ... and now the average age for the men's team going into London is 26!

2) CSNChicago.com: It may be a tall order for the U.S. Olympic men's swim team to duplicate the amazing run of medals they garnered during the 2008 Games in Beijing (scoring ten world records no less), but they do have the one guy that all eyes will be watching once again: the one and only Michael Phelps. What's your prediction for this year's team and can Phelps rack up a gold in every event he's in this go-around?

Gaines: USA has a great team with many veterans like Phelps leading the way, but 28 out of the 49 swimming Olympians this year are first-timers, so it's a very young team. Michael will definitely win a lot of golds in London, but that perfect storm of 2008 will be hard to duplicate. Going 8-for-8 will be impossible in one way because he is only swimming seven events, but the world is a much tougher place thanks largely to Michael. Everyone had to ramp it up if they were going to try and compete with him. I think we are set for an epic duel between Phelps and Ryan Lochte, who has been the best swimmer in the world the last three years. They will swim against each other in two events (200 and 400 IM) but will have to swim WITH each other in possibly two relays ... rivals and teammates!

On the women's side, keep an eye out for Missy Franklin. She is a sensational young 17-year-old who is swimming seven events and has a legitimate shot of winning seven medals, something a female swimmer has never done in Olympics history.

3) CSNChicago.com: You've been a part of NBC Sports Olympic coverage since the '96 Games in Atlanta. How much preparation goes into your broadcasts? Walk us through that process.

Gaines: Good lord, do you have a couple of hours?! It takes a lot of studying and a lot of preparation, but i'ts something I enjoy because I love the sport so much. We go to France on July 20 to hang out with Team USA at their training camp for a couple of days and then go to London July 23 for rehearsals, meetings and more studying before it all begins July 28 when I will be at the pool from about 7am until well after 11pm for eight straight days. We will call some of the prelims and then finals at night. We have an amazing team with our producer Tommy Roy, director Drew Escoff, the greatest play-by-play man/wonderful friend Dan Hicks and so many others who make my job so much easier.

4) CSNChicago.com: As you well know, our city of Chicago lost out on their chance of hosting the 2016 Summer Games. Did we ever have a legit shot in your mind?

Gaines: I really did think Chicago was the single best bid city and felt they deserved to host those games. And I thought they were going to be the front runner. It wasn't in the cards I guess with the IOC and, although Rio will do a great job, I still think the powers that be will be sorry that they did not choose Chicago.

5) CSNChicago.com: It has to be acknowledged that you're a great leader in giving back to the community via all your charity endeavors. Were interested in hearing more about Rowdy's Kidz. Explain what that organization is all about.

Gaines: I work for the best company in the world, LIMU! When I started to work for them full time five years ago, our owner and CEO Gary Raser came to me and said he wanted to make difference in young children's lives. So he came up with the idea of Rowdy's Kidz. It is the charitable arm of our company where I am able to go all over the country and do free swim clinics for kids (and sometimes adults!) who wouldn't normally be able to afford having an Olympian come and do something like this.

I not only do the clinic, but I get to go various schools in the community, as well as children's hospitals. I didn't start swimming until I was 17, so my message is it's never too late to achieve your dreams because I'm living proof of that. I talk about living a healthy lifestyle because that is what we are all about as a company. I have loved every minute of it and my family and I are fortunate to be living our dream every day.

Gaines LINKS:

Official Rowdy Gaines website

NBCOlympics.com

Rowdys Kidz organizationinformation

Rowdy Gaines on Facebook

Rowdy Gaines on Twitter

Is Bears “D” in “football shape?” Lacking ability to finish? Fourth-quarter fades raise questions

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USA Today

Is Bears “D” in “football shape?” Lacking ability to finish? Fourth-quarter fades raise questions

During the critical fourth-quarter Oakland Raiders drive for a game-winning touchdown, one former Pro Bowl’er and NFL observer remarked to this writer that he was surprised to see a lot of hands on hips and mouth-breathing by members of the Bears defense – two common signs of being gassed.

Critiquing conditioning – or lack of – is problematic the way judging pain tolerance is. And if the Raiders score were an isolated incident, the question likely doesn’t come up.

But something is amiss. While the Bears defense remains among the NFL’s best, at least statistically, a shadow of concern is falling over the defense and its ability to close out games that it has within its reach.

The Bears held fourth-quarter leads over Denver and Oakland and allowed go-ahead touchdowns. They were rescued by Eddy Piñeiro’s 53-yard field goal in the final second. No such rescue in London.

Fully half of the eight touchdowns scored by Bears opponents in 2019 have come in fourth quarters. (The Bears themselves have not scored a single TD in any fourth quarter this season, but that’s a separate discussion.) By contrast, last season the defense did not allow a fourth-quarter touchdown in any of the final five regular-season games.

The temptation is to look only at the numbers, which are in fact positive. Even with the 24 points the Raiders scored against them in London, the Bears ranked second only to New England in scoring stinginess (13.8 ppg.) and fifth in yardage allowed (312 ypg.).

But the Bears have 17 sacks as a team; only three of those have come in fourth quarters.

Opposing quarterbacks have passed at an 81.3 rating in first halves; they are throwing at a 91.4 clip in second halves.

The defense has allowed 16 first downs in first quarters; 21 in seconds; 20 in thirds.

In 2019 fourth quarters, 34 first downs allowed.

Pulling the camera back for a wider view, extending back to include the disturbing 2018 playoff loss:

Vs. Philadelphia
Eagles drive 60 yards in 12 plays and nearly 4 minutes to score game-winning TD with :56 remaining. Cody Parkey’s double-doink overshadows fact that Bears defense forces Eagles into only two third downs and allows winning score on a fourth down.

Vs. Green Bay
With the Chicago offense sputtering all game and in need of a short field, Packers go on a 10-play, 73-yard drive that consumed 6:33 to set up a field goal to go up 10-3 deep in the fourth quarter.

At Denver
Inept Broncos offense scores 11 points in the fourth quarter to overcome a 13-3 Bears lead, driving 62 yards in 12 plays, converting two fourth downs and a two-point conversion. Denver’s second-half drives: 41 yards, 56 yards, 84 yards, 62 yards.

Vs. Washington
Bears build 28-0 lead before one of NFL’s worst offenses scores a pair of largely meaningless second-half TD’s.

Vs. Minnesota Vikings
Drive 92 yards in 13 plays for TD before Bears stiffen to stop two-point PAT and next Minnesota possession.

Vs. Oakland (London)
Raiders win game with 92-yard drive that includes fourth-down conversion on punt fake run despite Bears leaving No. 1 defensive unit in, anticipating fake.

The long-awaited debut of the Bulls starting lineup, rusty Wendell Carter Jr. and all

The long-awaited debut of the Bulls starting lineup, rusty Wendell Carter Jr. and all

After getting a look at each point guard in the starting lineup this preseason, Jim Boylen finally got a look at what appears to be his starting lineup for Opening Night. 

Tomas Satoransky started as the point next to Zach LaVine, Otto Porter Jr., Lauri Markkanen, and Wendell Carter Jr. That group was down 10-7 when Carter subbed out at the 8:36 mark but looked better in later stints in the game. 

Carter was noticeably slow on his first step on his defense, specifically on plays where Raptors center Chris Boucher was able to use his speed and length advantage to finish at the rim. But he was solid on the glass, even chipping in on the offensive rebounding side of things, grabbing 3 offensive boards in the first half alone. 

Carter was clearly re-adjusting to the speed of NBA basketball and as play-by-play broadcaster Stacey King noted during the game, he "just doesn't have his legs underneath him." He was 1-6 from the floor, struggling to get lift as he went up for putback layups around the basket. 

That being said, he was decent, more so on the defensive side of the floor where he became more active as the game wore on.

In his 16-minutes stint, Carter posted 10 points, 7 rebounds, an assist and a block, while picking up 3 personal fouls. 

Outside of Carter's return stint, the Bulls new-look starting group looked solid and offers hope as we approach the start of the NBA regular season.