White Sox

Adekoya attracts attention at Andrew

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Adekoya attracts attention at Andrew

Andrew has won state championships in baseball, bowling and badminton.
In basketball, however, the Tinley Park school has won only one regional title in 35 years. And the Thunderbolts have never won a conference title.

Jubril Adekoya and Alex Zappavigna hope to change all of that.

"When I leave, I want to feel as though I helped to build a tradition," Adekoya said. "I want to continue to keep my head on my shoulders, stay humble and leave a legacy behind. I hope I can be remembered as a kid who stayed at his community school and helped them make a run Downstate, a humble kid who put his community on his back and helped it to get attention and notoriety."

Adekoya, a 6-foot-6 junior, is making a name for himself -- and his school, which will carry a 6-0 record into the 62nd annual Kankakee Holiday Tournament Dec. 28-30 in Kankakee. He already has scholarship offers from Loyola, Akron, Toledo and Valparaiso and is averaging 16 points and 12 rebounds per game.

"He is the third Division I player in 35 years at Andrew," said coach Mike O'Halloran. "The assistant coach at Valparaiso, (former Illinois star) Roger Powell, said he reminds him of himself. He is very intelligent, knowledgeable and has great leadership skills. And as good a player as he is, he is even better off the court."

Adekoya, who had 16 points and 12 rebounds in last Friday's 55-30 rout of Bradley, is supported by his older brother, 6-foot-1 senior Jawad Adekoya (12.8 ppg), 6-foot senior point guard Mike Bobek (7.6 ppg, 3.6 assists), 6-foot-1 junior Glorind Lisha (6.2 ppg) and Zappavigna, a 6-foot-3 senior (5.6 ppg). Lisha had 14 points and three steals against Bradley. Tyler Hook, a 6-foot-5 senior (8.5 ppg), is the sixth man.

Like Adekoya, Zappavigna recalls when it wasn't fun to play basketball at Andrew. "I remember going to the last football game when Andrew made the state playoff. The stands were packed. Then a few months later, we played basketball and got blown out and not many people showed up," he said.

"I always read about baseball and football at Andrew. Basketball was an afterthought. We came in as freshmen and knew we had a good group. If we all stuck with it, we felt we could be successful. We felt that we could do things that this school has never done before.

"It's fun so far. It's cool to see people more excited about coming to basketball games for once. The student cheering section, T-Bolt Storm, is really into it. For once, people are talking about basketball instead of baseball or football."

It didn't happen overnight. But it happened by design. O'Halloran, in his 25th year of coaching, the last eight as Andrew's head coach, describes himself as a student of the game. He returned the top six players from last year's 16-11 team that lost to Lockport in the regional final and recognized there was a lot of basketball ability to work with.

"I knew we had good quality kids, lunch bucket kids who would work hard," said O'Halloran, a 1980 graduate of Homewood-Flossmoor. "They had a great summer. They played four nights a week. They played 40 games in two leagues. They have good chemistry. They'll intelligent and coachable.

"The community is taking notice. All of our kids are from here, freshmen through seniors. The people are getting excited about the team. The students are turning out. The kids see their peers coming out to see them. Everybody likes a winner."

Coming out of eighth grade, Jubril Adekoya had an option to go to a private school such as Marist but he chose to enroll at Andrew because his two brothers went there. He wanted to play basketball but he rationalized that education and ABCs were his priority, not basketball and X's and O's.

"It was the right decision for me and my family," he said. "Coming in as a freshman, I didn't know what to expect. After one year, I knew for a fact that we had some good players to make some noise around the area. Halfway through my sophomore year, when Lisha and I played together on the varsity, I realized how good we could be."

O'Halloran saw it, too. Last summer, Andrew defeated Morgan Park and Bloom and lost a close decision to St. Joseph. "If we could play against that caliber of team, we had something to look forward to this season," he said.

"We've had a summer camp for eight years but this group bought into it more and was more dedicated and more committed to it than any other. A lot of them are basketball players and not playing other sports. They aren't pulled in different directions. They made time to make a commitment. They juggled their schedules and balanced their time."

Jubril Adekoya saw the difference, too. "I've been on a lot of teams where one bad apple can ruin the whole bunch. I was excited to come back this year. I'm not surprised to be 6-0 now. I'm blessed to be with the guys I am with. We're not satisfied with anything we've done. As well as we're playing, our ceiling is much higher," he said.

Adekoya has received a lot of interest from mid-major colleges. But he isn't hung up on recruiting. He plans to patiently bide his time while the process runs its course. "I want to prove I can play at a higher level and get their attention so they will offer me," he said.

Zappavigna believes Andrew will command more attention if it wins the Kankakee tournament. "In order to prove we are for real officially, we have to win at Kankakee," he said.

"The difference with this team is we work well together. Each person knows his place. We don't care who scores points. We won at Thornton and Jubril had only five points. We overcome our lack of size with hustle, by crashing the boards as a team and by getting second-chance points. Yes, it's cool to see people excited to come to our basketball games."

Opening-round pairings of the Kankakee Holiday Tournament will pit Momence vs. Manteno, Deer Creek-Mackinaw vs. Illiana Christian, Watseka vs. Bishop McNamara and St. Anne vs. Herscher in Class AAA and Newport Harbor (Calif.) vs Milwaukee South, Bremen vs. Bradley, Andrew vs. Carver and Kanakee vs. Peotone in Class 3A4A.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Manny Machado Mania

Manny Machado to the White Sox?? It's been the dream for many White Sox fans for months.

With Machado in town to the play the White Sox, Chuck Garfien and Vinnie Duber discuss the White Sox chances of signing the soon-to-be-free agent.

Garfien also talks with Nicky Delmonico who played with Machado and fellow free agent to be Bryce Harper on the U.S.A. 18-under national team.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

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USA TODAY

Rick Renteria issues another benching after Welington Castillo doesn't hustle on popup

One thing you better do if you play for Rick Renteria is run to first base.

Yet again, Renteria benched one of his players Monday for the sin of not hustling down the line.

Welington Castillo, a veteran, not a developing player in need of ample “learning experiences,” popped up to first base with two runners on and nobody out in the sixth inning of Monday’s eventual 3-2 loss to the visiting Baltimore Orioles. He did not run down to first, instead staying at home plate.

So when the inning ended and the White Sox took the field, Castillo stayed in the dugout.

Ricky’s boys don’t quit, or so the slogan goes. But what happens when a player doesn’t live up to that mantra? What happens when they don’t play their absolute hardest for all 27 outs, as the T-shirts preach? This is what happens. A benching.

“It was towering fly ball in the infield at first, probably had 15, 20 seconds of hangtime,” Renteria explained after the game. “I assumed the dropped ball. It has occurred. He could, at minimum, at least start moving that way.

“That’s uncharacteristic of him, to be honest, it truly is. Maybe he was just frustrated in that he had the fly ball and just stayed at the plate, but there was no movement toward first at all. And you guys have heard me talk to all the guys about at least giving an opportunity to move in that particular direction.

“Everybody says, ‘Well, 99 out of (100) times he’s going to catch that ball.’ And then that one time that he doesn’t, what would I do if the ball had been dropped? Would it have made it easier to pull him? Well, it was just as easy because you expect not the best, but the worst.

“That is uncharacteristic of that young man. I had a quick conversation with him on the bench, and he knew and that was it.”

It might seem a little overdramatic, a little nutty, even, to sit down a veteran catcher brought in this offseason to provide some offense and to do it in a one-run game. But this rebuild is about more than just waiting around for the minor league talent to make its way to the South Side. It’s about developing an organizational culture, too. And Renteria feels that if he lets this kind of thing slide at the big league level, that won’t send the right message to those precious prospects who will one day fill out this lineup.

“There’s one way to do it, you get your action, you start moving toward that direction in which you’ve got to go,” Renteria said. “What would’ve happened if everybody’s watching it — and I’m setting the tone for not only here, our club, (but also for) everybody in the minor leagues — and they’re saying, ‘Well, at the top, they said they’re going to do this and then they don’t do it.’

“It’s really simple. And people might like it, not like it. I’ve got to do this, do that so everybody understands what we’re trying to do here. We’re not done with what we’re trying to do.”

This isn’t the first time this has happened in 2018. Avisail Garcia was taken out of a game during spring training for not giving maximum effort. Leury Garcia was removed from a game earlier this month for not busting it down the first-base line on a weak grounder that went right to the first baseman.

It’s become a somewhat common tactic for Renteria, and while it might strike some as taking things a little too seriously, what good is this developmental season if a culture goes undeveloped? The White Sox have placed their bright future, in part, in Renteria’s hands, and they’ve talked glowingly about how the players have bought into his style and how the team played last season under his leadership.

If Renteria truly is the right man for the rebuild, things like this are how he’s going to establish his culture. And it will, he hopes, impact how all those prospects play when they’re no longer prospects and the White Sox are contending for championships.