Cassidy Thornburg

Pat McAfee thinks Cam Newton is the move the Bears should be making this offseason

Pat McAfee thinks Cam Newton is the move the Bears should be making this offseason

Recently on the always-light-hearted, analytical-bending Pat McAfee Show, the former Indianapolis Colts player turned radio host weighed in on the Bears’ decision to keep Mitch Trubisky under center for the upcoming season. McAfee believes it’s time the Bears climb back into relevancy by replacing Trubisky with former-MVP Cam Newton:

If I was the Chicago Bears, I would be trying to get Cam Newton. What's the worst that could happen? He stinks? You guys stink anyways. 

With a “what do you have to lose?” mantra, McAfee believes that the Bears should swap out Trubisky for the Panthers' star. Newton is not a free agent, however; it's possible his time with the Panthers could be up,  as it's been heavily-rumored that they'll trade him away this offseason. Newton was sidelined most of the 2019 season with back-to-back injuries, first in his shoulder, then his ankle. If they trade away Newton, the Panthers could allot the money to rebuilding their team around one of the league’s best running backs, Christian McCaffery. 

Bulls host 17th annual Thanksgiving Dinner

Bulls host 17th annual Thanksgiving Dinner

The Bulls hosted their 17th annual Thanksgiving Dinner on Sunday at the Pacific Garden Mission. Several members of the organization, coaching staff, and players wearing red “Bulls” aprons and clear plastic gloves, scattered throughout the large cafeteria space to serve the community a warm Thanksgiving meal.

Coach Jim Boylen helped carve one of the four turkeys in the ceremonial turkey carving, while Will Perdue looked like he was vying for his fifth NBA Championship as he balanced almost 10 plates on two trays. Perdue then joyfully shuffled through the room with his wife, assisting his game by handing off plates to the seated guests. And Thad Young brought his two sons, Thad Jr. and Taylor, to help him hand out food. 

Aside from Young, among the eight or so players serving at the event was the recently healthy Chandler Hutchison, who was impressed by the Bulls’ commitment to the community through the annual event, and grateful to be a part of it.   

“The fact that they’ve (The Bulls) done it for 17 years speaks so much to the dedication that they have,” Hutchison said. “I mean, just seeing the look on their face when you’re handing them out food and they're like, ‘Those are actually the people you know that are playing and they're sitting here, helping us out, taking time out of their day.' It makes me feel good inside to be able to do that.” 

Hutchison saw the event as a small way that he was able to show love to others.

“It just takes an hour, maybe two hours out of our day, but to them it could mean a lot," he said.  

Also present at the event, was Tomáš Satoranský, who is new to the idea of celebrating Thanksgiving. 

“First of all, I come from Europe, so I don’t celebrate Thanksgiving that much,” Satoranský said. “But it was amazing to see how much good stuff they’re making and how much work is behind it, to serve such great food like that.”  

Satoranský is in for a surprise when the Bulls celebrate Thanksgiving on the road in Portland. The Bulls haven’t given him much insight into what it will entail, other than that “the Chicago Bulls always celebrate it big time." A team that makes sure his first Thanksgiving celebration is one to remember, among other things, gives Satoranský a lot to be grateful for this season. 

“I’m thankful for being here, being with the team and my new teammates, belonging in a new family, as well as I have a new baby born who's nine months old — that’s what comes to my mind now," he said. 

Hutchison shared several reasons he is thankful to the Bulls’ organization this Thanksgiving, starting with the fact that they drafted him 22nd overall in 2018. 

“I mean really, they drafted me,“ he said. “So, let’s start there. I’m thankful to be in this situation and playing with and meeting people throughout the organization and on my team, who care about me, people that I am going to be spending a lot of time with — just a good all-around situation."

Hutchison was asked what he brings to the Thanksgiving “table,” so to speak, or Bulls organization.

“I just try to be someone that’s light-hearted and always kind of in a good mood, bringing energy," he said. "Someone who’s just going to show up, work hard, and not just do what’s required, but do extra. For me, that’s something that I feel like I bring to the table.”

Pacific Garden Mission is the oldest, continuously-operating rescue mission in the country, and has been a refuge for the Chicago community since 1877.

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Lawrence Cherono outkicks second and third to win 2019 Chicago Marathon

Lawrence Cherono outkicks second and third to win 2019 Chicago Marathon

After 26.2 miles of winding through the packed streets of Chicago on a quintessential day to run, with unbeatable forty-degree fall temperatures, the men’s 2019 Chicago Marathon came down to one second.

Kenyan runner Lawrence Cherono outkicked Ethiopian runners Debela Dejene and Asefa Mengstu in the final 400 meters to win the men’s elite race. After running 26 miles and some change, the top three band of runners looked like they were coming down the home stretch of an 800-meter track race rather than the final minute of their endurance run.

Long-winded, yet determined to fight for first, Cherono, Dejene, and Mengstu finished within three seconds of each other – the closest podium finish in Chicago Marathon history. It was such a close margin that the entourage of people gathering around the finish and crowding Michigan Ave. had to crane their necks to see Cherono cross first. 

Some may have been surprised that British distance runner Mo Farah, last year’s champion, wasn’t in the mix. Farah competed again this year but finished more than four minutes off his winning time last year of 2:05:11.

Leading the men’s elite field this October, Cherono ran a 2:05:45, topping his winning time from April's Boston Marathon (2:07:57). He is the first man since 2006 to win both titles in the same year – the latter, secured in a second.